Is Benintendi the Next Yastrzemski?

Only those who saw Carl Yastrzemski play in the 1960s and 70s can really say whether anyone on the current roster can field and hit as well as the legendary Red Sox left fielder. Yaz’s status in Boston is only second to Ted Williams (and I would argue is well above David Ortiz). While Mookie Betts and Chris Sale certainly take the cake when it comes to the team’s top stars, this writer would argue that Benintendi is just starting what could become one of the greatest careers in Boston. Does that mean Benintendi is the next Yastrzemski?

Benintendi and Yastrzemski Side by Side

It’s hard NOT to compare the two. They both play in left field. Both came along shortlynext yastrzemski after the departure of legendary Red Sox hitters (Williams and Ortiz). They are both roughly the same size (5’11, 175 and 5’10, 170, respectively). They both posted solid numbers in their first full season in the majors with Benintendi hitting .271 with 20 HRs, and 90 RBIs while Yaz hit .266 with 11 HRs, and 80 RBIs. Statistically speaking, their first few years in the big leagues are not too different from one another. Does that mean Benintendi is the next Yastrzemski though? Hardly.

First of all, it wasn’t just the numbers that Yaz posted in his career that made him so legendary. He all but single-handedly carried the Red Sox to the World Series on his bat in the last two weeks of the 1967 season by hitting .491 (27/55) with five homers and 18 RBIs in the last fifteen games of the season. In his career, Yastrzemski won the 1967 Triple Crown and MVP, was an 18x All-Star, and a 7x Gold Glove Winner. Playing his entire career in Boston from 1961 to 1983 only cemented his status in Boston as one of the all-time greats. Benintendi, however, is only entering his third full season in the majors, but he’s already made strong impressions.

Benintendi’s Making Marks of His Own

Anyone who was watching Game 2 of the 2018 World Series will never forget the amazing catch Benintendi made to snuff out the Dodgers’ Brian Dozer’s hopes of getting a base hit. This catch came days after Benintendi made a game-saving robbery of a hit from the Astros’ Alex Bregman in the ALCS. Both catches factored significantly in Red Sox victories in those series. They also boosted Benintendi’s status as a strong left fielder. His abilities leave no doubt that Benintendi has the chance to be the next Yastrzemski of Boston.

So Is Benintendi the Next Yastrzemski?

It’s too early to tell right now. It’s rare for players to stay with one team for their entire careers anymore. If Benintendi stays in Boston though, it will surprise no one if twenty years from now we see his jersey number 16 retired alongside Yaz’s.

Congrats and Thank You From the Yawkey Way Report

The staff of the Yawkey Way Report would like to congratulate the Boston Red Sox for winning the 2018 World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers!

The staff of the Yawkey Way Report would also like to thank Red Sox Nation for its support during the 2018 season. Without you we wouldn’t have had the success we had this season.

We look forward to seeing what good fortune 2019 brings us and seeing the great fans of Red Sox Nation back in the spring!

And again, congratulations to the Boston Red Sox for defeating the Los Angeles Dodgers in the World Series!

Rick Porcello Almost Threw a Perfect Game

Rick Porcello almost threw a perfect game against the New York Yankees on August 3rd. For some reason though no one seemed to notice. I know that “almost” doesn’t translate into “he did.” But people do not realize how rare it is to see a perfect game. Look at it this way. Baseball as we know it has been around since the 1880s. According to Sean Forman of baseball-reference.com, there have been over 210,000 major league games played over the last 140 years. Guess how many of them were perfect games? Only 23. The fact that Porcello came within striking distance of a perfect game is in itself no small feat and one that should be recognized.

A perfect game by today’s standards is when a pitcher retires all twenty-seven batters in arick porcello almost row. Nine innings multiplied by three outs an inning equals twenty-seven. It’s a feat so rare that baseball didn’t see one between 1923 and 1955. It’s something so difficult to achieve that its very name denotes the standard that a pitcher has to meet in order to join the exclusive club. In fact, baseballism.com has a deal where they’ll take 40% off all their baseball merchandise for 24 hours following a perfect game this season. THAT’S how rare it is to see a perfect game.

Rick Porcello Almost Joined An Exclusive Club

Back to Rick Porcello almost throwing a perfect game. The game itself was Porcello’s most masterful game so far in his career. The fact that he retired 21 Yankee batters in a row is in itself a rarity for anyone. The only thing you read about in the sports section the next day though was how Porcello pitched a one-hitter. It wasn’t a shutout, and it wasn’t a no-hitter. The one hit he gave up was a home run that destroyed Porcello’s chance at a perfect game. If it hadn’t been for that one home run Porcello likely would have become the 24th pitcher EVER to throw a perfect game. Just one hit…

Rick Porcello Almost Cost Jordan Furniture $100,000,000

You read that right. Jordan’s Furniture’s Eliot Tatelman told WBZ TV Boston Sports Director Steve Burton that “Rick Porcello’s one-hitter last night would have been free furniture to 45,000 families, over $100,000,000.00. One pitch made the difference.” That makes you wonder if the CEO of baseballism.com was just as nervous.

Gimmicks aside, most pitchers will tell you that they value a win over personal gain. I think that’s true in Porcello’s case. It was another victory that further secured the Red Sox’s first-place standing. Given how well the Red Sox are playing this season though, Rich Porcello’s almost perfect game won’t be the team’s last chance at achieving greatness this season.

Red Sox Chasing History This Season

Witnessing the Red Sox chasing history this season has become my new favorite thing. They are fifty games above .500 for the first time since 1946. That was the year the Red Sox lost the World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals in seven games. There’s something particularly special about this year’s team though. It’s not just Mookie Betts’ .350 batting average, or J.D. Martinez’s 37 home runs as of August 13th. It’s not even the fact that they are the only team with 80+ wins so far this season. Everyone in Red Sox Nation is talking about how amazing this year’s team is.

Although everyone knew this season would be great with the acquisition of J.D. Martinez, Ired sox chasing think it began to dawn on people that the 2018 Red Sox could become one of the best teams in franchise history when they swept the Yankees. It wasn’t just that they won all four games in the series at the beginning of August. It was what happened during the series that made people’s heads turn and jaws drop.

The first game Thursday night saw the Red Sox overcome a four-run deficit to win 15-7 on the back of Steve Pearce’s three home runs. The second game saw Rick Porcello retire the last twenty-one batters he faced for a one-hitter that could have been a perfect game if he hadn’t surrendered a home run to Miguel Andujar in the third. The third game saw Nathan Eovaldi take a shutout into the eighth inning. The fourth game, which the Yankees almost won, was the final nail in their coffin. Andrew Benintendi’s walk-off blooper through the Yankees’ defense shut down the Bronx Bombers for good.

Red Sox Chasing Destiny and History

The Red Sox are doing so well this season that I’m already thinking about how I’m going to afford World Series tickets. I foresee many weekday mornings where people will arrive at work with bags under their eyes. I foresee players on this year’s Red Sox roster taking home a Cy Young, MVP, Gold Glove, and Silver Slugger Award. Finally, I see myself skipping work to watch the Red Sox World Series parade down Boylston Street.

Does Barry Bonds Deserve Hall of Fame Induction?

The 2018 Baseball Hall of Fame inductions took place over the last weekend in July in Cooperstown, NY. These inductions often spark debate over who continues to be left out. Names like Roger Clemens, and Barry Bonds often come up. Bonds is struggling to get inducted despite being the home run king, as he holds the season and career home run records. Despite his connections to PED usage, and his reputation as a moody guy, does Barry Bonds deserve induction into the Hall of Fame?

This writer says no for reasons that I’ll expand on later in this article. First, though, IBonds deserves recognize the fact that Bonds is the home run king. With or without PEDs, it takes a high level of skill to make contact with a 90+ MPH fastball. As of today, Bonds is only one of three players ever to hit more than 700 home runs in his career. He’s one of two players to ever hit 70 home runs in a season. On top of that, he accumulated multiple MVP awards, batting titles, and Gold Gloves. So no one can say he’s not qualified for the Hall of Fame. That doesn’t mean he belongs there though.

Does Bonds Deserve More Consideration? His Past Says No.

Here’s my beef with Bonds. While it’s quite the feat that he hit 762 home runs in his career, the question I keep asking is “So what?” Were his home runs more significant than Babe Ruth or Hank Aaron’s? Ruth’s home runs brought people back to the ballpark in the wake of the 1919 Black Sox scandal. Aaron showed a tremendous amount of perseverance in the fact of racial adversity while he chased Ruth’s record. What did Bonds’ home run chase do? You can argue that he broke Aaron’s record in the face of mounting criticism of his used of PEDs, but Bonds brought that criticism on himself. In my opinion, numbers aside, the inability to answer that question leaves a gaping hole in the argument to induct Bonds into the Hall of Fame.

The other issue I have with Bonds is his inability to be a team player. According to ESPN, during his time on the baseball team at Arizona State, Bonds was so despised by his teammates that all but two voted to kick him off the team after numerous altercations. Then there’s the arrogance Bonds displayed during his years with the Pittsburg Pirates and San Francisco Giants where fans, media, and even his teammates harbored a strong dislike for him. In my view, it reflects his inability to appreciate all those who contribute to the game. For Bonds, it was all about him.

Does Bonds Deserve To Be In The Hall? No, But Not Because Of PEDs

Bonds’ alleged PED use doesn’t turn me off to Bonds. In fact, last year I wrote an article arguing that Roger Clemens should be inducted into the Hall of Fame. As many know, Clemens allegedly used PEDs. Clemens was a fierce competitor too.

It is the idea that Bonds played in a world separate from one that contributes significance and meaning to the game that makes me argue against his induction. In Bonds’ world, all he cared about was accumulating as many homers as possible. It’s as if he cared about nothing other than personal gain. And for what? It’s clear he didn’t care about being a team player. So what was Bonds trying to accomplish?

For me, Bonds’ numbers aren’t enough to merit induction. To me, it’s not about the numbers, it’s about how the numbers impacted and contributed to the game. In my view, Bonds’ numbers were nothing more than self-serving efforts to quell his inner demons.

Babe Ruth and Hank Aaron are worth their weight in gold. In my view, Bonds is worth his weight in monopoly money. Bonds might have the numbers, but it’s not enough to buy his way into the Hall.

Red Sox Dominated 2018 All-Star Lineup

Five members of the Boston Red Sox played in the 2018 American League All-Star team this week. Mookie Betts, J.D. Martinez, Mitch Moreland, Chris Sale, and Craig Kimbrel represented Boston. As the Red Sox dominated the All-Star lineup this year, they got a taste of what they’ll be up against if and when they reach the World Series this season.

These Red Sox players brought a lot of history to Nationals Park this year. Chrisred sox dominate Sale started the All-Star game marking only the third time in history that a pitcher has started three straight All-Star games. The other two are Robin Roberts, and Lefty Gomez. Mookie Betts was named leadoff hitter for the American League team. Sale and Craig Kimbrel, Boston’s premier closer, now both have seven All-Star appearances. Surprisingly enough, this was only J.D. Martinez’s second All-Star game. He hit 45 home runs last year but didn’t make an All-Star appearance. SO what does all this mean? To Red Sox Nation, it’s a sign of what’s to come this fall. These All-Stars, a few of who are carrying Hall of Fame-worthy numbers, will carry the Red Sox to the post-season this year.

Red Sox Dominated All-Star Line-Up, And Possibly the National League Come October

The All-Star game itself saw its fair share of home runs. Aaron Judge, Mike Trout, Alex Bregman, George Springer, and Jean Segura hit homers for the American League. Wilson Contreras, Christian Yelich, Scooter Gennett, Joey Votto, and Trevor Story hit home runs of their own for the National League. Overall there were ten home runs hit in this year’s All-Star game, breaking the 1971 record by four. This year’s All-Star game also saw 25 strikeouts. The American League went on to win their sixth straight All-Star game 8-6 in 10 innings.

The Red Sox have the best record in baseball right now. They’re 68-30 at the All-Star break. That’s slightly better than the World Series-defending champs Houston Astros. With four of their pitchers (Sale, Price, Rodriguez, and Porcello) projected to win 17 or more games this season, it’s clear the Red Sox have the pitching and the hitting to make it to the Fall Classic.