ALDS Pitching Match-Ups

The importance of pitching in the postseason has been abused to the point that it is now clichéd. The focus of the Red Sox-Indians ALDS pitching will be no different. So much has been made about the starting rotation for both teams that it is tough to find a more crucial factor in this series. Plenty of question marks occupy the starting slots for these two division winners, which is why it’s imperative to take a deeper look at each game.

Game One ALDS Pitching Match-Up

Game One seems like a rare postseason mismatch, at least on paper. Going for the RedALDS Pitching Sox is Cy Young-frontrunner Rick Porcello, toting along his ML-leading 22 wins. Porcello has nary had trouble with the Tribe in his career. The Indians may have home-field advantage, but that shouldn’t faze Porcello either. In the past three seasons, he has two wins there with an ERA of 0.90. On the other hand, Trevor Bauer’s numbers don’t quite stack up. Bauer has had his struggles this year, which includes a stint in the bullpen, culminating in a 12-8 record with a 4.26 ERA. This year, Bauer is 0-1 with an ERA of 9.00 against the Red Sox. Also, the normal Red Sox lineup (with Travis Shaw and Brock Holt) is hitting .455 against Bauer in his career, that per Boston Sports Info on Twitter. Give the advantage to Boston in Game One.

Game Two ALDS Pitching Match-Up

Friday will bring about quite an intriguing match-up in Game Two. The Red Sox turn to their 217 million dollar man, David Price. While Price has picked it up in the second half, his frightening postseason numbers still lurk in the shadows. In eight postseason starts, Price has a 2-7 record and a 5.12 ERA. In 63.1 postseason innings, he’s allowed 12 home runs, 11 walks, and about a hit per inning. For Cleveland, there is plenty of uncertainty surrounding their former Cy Young winner, Corey Kluber. Kluber did win 18 games again this year, but he has had a nagging groin hinder the last month of his season. Kluber has won 10 games at home this year, but also has a 4.38 ERA against Boston in 2016. When Kluber is on, he’s on, no matter the situation. Price’s uncertainties outweighs Kluber’s, advantage Cleveland.

Game Three ALDS Pitching Match-Up

To conclude a massive day in Boston sports sunday, the Red Sox will host Game Three. Clay Buchholz will go to the hill for Boston and Josh Tomlin for the Indians. This is part of the “roll the dice” mantra for the Red Sox after starting Porcello and Price. Buchholz has been sharp in the second half with a 5-1 record and a 3.22 ERA. Tomlin doesn’t offer much deception outside of his fastball and has proved to be hittable this season. He hasn’t started much lately (only three in September), and has a 4.76 ERA at Fenway the past three years. Coming home in a tie series, the upper hand will go the Red Sox here.

Games Four-Five ALDS Pitching

Game Four on Monday brings a dilemma to Terry Francona’s Indians. It appears as if they’ll start their “ace” Trevor Bauer on four days rest. With Eduardo Rodriguez going for the Red Sox, there will be plenty of crooked numbers on the left field scoreboard. They will surely be playing long ball at Fenway in Game Four (if necessary.) With that, give me the league’s best offense in a shootout. Advantage Red Sox.

While I don’t think Game Five will necessarily happen, it’s definitely a toss-up. It is always hard to pick a winner-take-all game like that. If we are to look at the raw statistics though, it looks like no contest. Picking against Rick Porcello at all the past few months would have been foolish. Also, Cleveland still does not know what to expect from a laboring Corey Kluber. If it gets to that, I don’t care where it’s being played, give me the Red Sox.

Obviously, there are plenty of other factors to think about in this series. Bullpens, switch-hitters, and a struggling Mike Napoli are not to be forgotten. But if we’re purely going on starting pitching, this is the Red Sox’s series to lose.

What’s Next For Hobbling Red Sox?

After two dreadful seasons, the Boston Red Sox clinched their first playoff berth since 2013. It came during an eleven-game winning streak. A streak that saw Hanley Ramirez’s bat litter the night sky with spinning white baseballs. A streak where the Red Sox came from behind to beat their nemesis, the New York Yankees. Although they are now playoff contenders, the hobbling Red Sox, who won only one game after September 25th, will now face the Cleveland Indians on Thursday, October 6th. There’s much at stake as the Red Sox travel to Cleveland.

It could be said that the retirement ceremonies played a role in the Red Sox poor season finish. Thehobbling red sox attention David Ortiz received no doubt distracted him. Despite all the praise showered on Ortiz, it also hurt the team’s ability to stay focused. This may have led the team to lose important games in the final week of the season. Of course, it’s not fair to say that the attention Ortiz received broke the team’s winning streak. Other factors include manager John Farrell’s choice to play the B team in to keep the team’s top players healthy for the playoffs. Regardless of that plan, a Red Sox victory on the last day of the season would have capped what has already been a historic year for the team. Instead, a hobbling Red Sox team lost to the Toronto Blue Jays, who are fighting for a playoff spot themselves.

Beating Cleveland Will Be a Challenge for The Hobbling Red Sox

The Cleveland Indians are one of those teams that people often forget about. Since their incorporation in 1901, the Indians have won only two World Series titles, in 1920 and 1948. They’ve come close since then, but they still rank among the top when it comes to World Series droughts. One might say that Boston doesn’t want a World Series title as badly as Cleveland does since they just won one three years ago. That idea, however, is ridiculous. The Red Sox aren’t so arrogant as to “forfeit” a World Series title, especially in Big Papi’s final season, which would be the greatest of sendoffs for any retiring player.

If the Red Sox are going to make it to the World Series, they have to play their A game. The hobbling Red Sox have to snap out of the lethargic play fans saw last week. Yes, they’re tired, but they’ll have to work harder than ever now. The Red Sox won’t only face a hungry team in Cleveland, they’ll also have to play before an enthusiastic crowd.

Whatever the Red Sox do on Thursday, there’s one thing they MUST remember: It’s very bad to drink Jobu’s rum.

Very bad.

Where Will Dombrowski and the Red Sox Strike Next?

The Red Sox got their ace, and they got a solid closer as well. So, the question is now where will Dombrowski and company go from here? On paper, the team looks like a team that should be in the playoffs next year, assuming they can stay relatively healthy.

Dave Dombrowski has said that acquiring David Price will most likely be the last “major Dombrowski Red Soxmove,” but I disagree with that to an extent, and here is why: The Red Sox are not a World Series team yet. They have an ace in Price, but I believe the Red Sox still need either a number 2 starter or another solid reliever. Right now, the greater need is probably bullpen help because 2 of their key guys, Junichi Tazawa and Koji Uehara, have struggled with inconsistencies over the past season and a half or so. And Koji is nearing the end of the line at 40 years old, so I don’t know how much gas he has left in the tank. And no team can win without a good bullpen (see: Kansas City).

True, acquiring Craig Kimbrel was a good start, but I think they still need at least one more 7th or 8th inning guy in front of Kimbrel to really shore up the back end of the pen up and take some of the pressure off Koji Uehara and Junichi Tazawa.

In my opinion, getting another starter behind David Price is less of a need than another bullpen help because if the starters we already have pitch like they can, then the rotation should be set. And getting Price will take the pressure off guys like Clay Buchholz and Rick Porcello, as well as help the young guys we have develop, since they can definitely learn a lot from a great pitcher like David Price. If they go out and get a #2 starter, that would be good, but if it came down to it, I’d like to see the Red Sox go after another bullpen arm instead of resting on what they have now, as good as it is at the moment.

 

Red Sox Sign David Price to Historic Deal

According to multiple reports, the Boston Red Sox have finally captured their ace, with David Price signing a 7-year, $217 million contract to become the most expensive pitcher in baseball history.

Red Sox sign David Price

The Boston Globe broke the news on Tuesday night, heralding a fresh era for New England sports. After years of reticence to pay huge salaries to ageing pitchers, ownership has altered its philosophy, allowing Dave Dombrowski to consummate an historic deal. No Red Sox player has ever earned more than Price will, as his pact eclipses the 8-year, $160 million deal with Manny Ramirez in 2000.

This record-breaking deal includes an opt-out clause after three seasons, which could be beneficial for both sides, while the Red Sox smash through the luxury tax threshold with authority. Incidentally, Boston will now pay $140 million more to Price than what they offered Jon Lester in the run up to his free agency. Undoubtedly, that speaks to Dave Dombrowski’s roster-building aggression and his fresh power on Yawkey Way. This is now his team, and it will be managed in his win-now vision henceforth.

In Price, the Red Sox get the defining free agent of this stacked class. Through seven full seasons, the 30-year old has averaged 16 wins, 227 innings pitched and 216 strikeouts, to compliment a 3.09 ERA and 1.132 WHIP. In every way, he is the ace personified, a horse you can rely on for dominance and leadership. He’s another pivotal building block in Dombrowski’s revolution, joining Craig Kimbrel and the homegrown core of Dustin Pedroia, Mookie Betts, Xander Bogaerts and Blake Swihart.

Accordingly, genuine hope has been rekindled in Red Sox Nation, which can once again smell World Series contention after an inconsistent era. Work is still to be done, and nothing is ever certain in baseball, but with a warrior like David Price spearheading a revamped rotation, Boston’s most obvious weakness can almost be considered a strength, which is a testament to Dombrowski and his swift work.

Red Sox Offseason Preview: Who Stays, Who Goes

The Red Sox are poised to have an interesting offseason, to say the least. Most of Red Sox Nation wouldn’t argue that the Red Sox need to look for pitching help during the offseason, but the question is how do they get said pitching help? There are a couple notable free agents available, namely David Price and Johnny Cueto. There are also a few players that could be available via trade, notably Matt Harvey, who has been mentioned a few times in connection with the Red Sox.Red Sox offseason

If they do look for a trade, which is entirely possible, the question becomes who would the team be willing to trade to get an ace or a strong reliever? It’s a question that the Red Sox will have to answer because I’m sure there will be interest in making a deal for one or more of the Red Sox promising young players. Here’s who will stay and who might go when this Red Sox offseason

Who Stays:

David Ortiz: David is one of the few that won’t be leaving. He’s 39, and at this point, it’s hard to see Ortiz finishing his career anywhere besides Fenway Park.

Dustin Pedroia: He’s the co-face of the Red Sox with David Ortiz at the moment, and he’ll be the sole face of the team when Ortiz retires. Plus, he has 6 years left on the 8-year deal he signed back in 2013 and there will be be few teams willing to take on that deal.

Mookie Betts: One of the Red Sox best young talent’s, it’s very difficult to imagine the team letting him go unless they get a very, very good return.

Xander Bogaerts: Like Betts, a very good young player, and unlikely to be traded.

Who Goes:

Blake Swihart: With Christian Vazquez coming back, Blake Swihart could be on a lot of team’s radars. I’m sure he could get a lot in return if the Red Sox do decide to trade him.

Hanley Ramirez and Pablo Sandoval: After a disappointing first year for both guys, the team could be looking to dump their massive contracts, similar to the deal they pulled of with the LA Dodgers that sent Josh Beckett, Adrian Gonzalez and Carl Crawford to LA.

Allen Craig: After under-performing for a season and a half, the team could be looking to deal him before next season.

Clay Buchholz: Clay has an option for next season, and even if the team picks it up, he could still be dealt. He has had injury problems through the years, and the team has to decide whether or not he is worth the injury troubles he has.

This is how I see the Red Sox offseason playing out. Of course, this is all speculation, and I could be wrong. We’ll have to wait and see, but one thing is for certain—this will be an interesting Red Sox offseason!

Red Sox Fans Now Chicago Cubs Fans

For one month, and one month only,  much of Red Sox Nation has jumped on the Chicago Cubs bandwagon. Why? Because the Cubs have suffered longer than Red Sox fans, going 107 years without a championship. After the Red Sox waited 86 years in between championships, most of Red Sox Nation can empathize with the Cubs, and were quick to jump on their bandwagon.

And when you look at the Chicago Cubs, it’s not hard to find reasons to root for them. For Chicago Cubsstarters, ex-Red Sox pitcher Jon Lester, part of 2 championships, and ex-GM Theo Epstein, who built the team who broke the “Curse of the Bambino,” are both with the Cubs now. Not to mention Manny Ramirez, who won the World Series MVP in 2004, and David Ross, who was one of the leaders of the beard movement in 2013. Second, the Cubs are loaded with young talent, notably Jake Arrieta and Kris Bryant. Those are just a couple of the things the Cubs have going for them.

But the main thing? Empathy. For 86 years, the Red Sox were in the same boat as the Cubs. While our curse involved a questionable trade, being unlucky in the World Series, a missed ground ball, and a few ill-timed home runs by the New York Yankees, we eventually broke it after 86 years. The Cubs are cursed in a different way; theirs involving a goat, a tavern, and an unfortunate case of fan interference back in 2003 in the NLCS against the Florida Marlins. So, the Red Sox and Cubs are similar in that they were both cursed for long periods of time.

Personally, I really hope the Cubs finish the job. They need to break their curse, since they’re the only team left with a “curse”, and they need to win it all. They’ll face the New York Mets in the NLCS. Go Cubs.