Red Sox Offense Continues to Flourish

You can wave goodbye to the narrative that the Red Sox’ unheralded start to theRed Sox Offense season is a result of poor competition. After opening the season with nine games against the Rays and Marlins, they took two of three from the Yankees. Then they swept the Orioles. Then they took their high-powered offense across the country and swept the Los Angeles Angels. The Red Sox offense picked up right where they left off against their counterpart atop the American League standings, outscoring the Halos 27-3 in the series. Boston has won 7 straight and their 16-2 record is the MLB’s best start since 1987.

The brilliance of Boston’s offense has been no secret this season. They entered the series on a 4-game win streak with a top-two offense in Major League Baseball. The Angels boasted the league’s top offense as of Monday. Just days later, the Red Sox now own the best offense, and best record, in the nation.

Red Sox Offense: The Ohtani Test

In the series opener, the Red Sox got their first look at rookie phenom Shohei Ohtani. Ohtani has taken the MLB by storm with his dynamic two-way talent and jumped out to a 2-0 start with only four hits allowed. Boston’s juggernaut of an offense had other plans.

The Red Sox matched Ohtani’s hit total for the season in just two innings. The first came a mere seven pitches into the game when Mookie Betts sent one of his praised fastballs 411 feet over the center field wall. Ohtani’s night ended after just two innings, but Boston’s offense was just getting started. Betts added two more solo shots, tying Ted Williams’ franchise record for most career games with three home runs (3). Rafael Devers, Brock Holt, and Jackie Bradley Jr. all went deep as well. The Sox, totaling 15 hits in this offensive showcase, cruised to a 10-1 victory in the series opener.

Consistent Offense

In game two, the best offense in the MLB picked up right where they left off. Home runs from J.D. Martinez and Mitch Moreland, and a grand slam from Rafael Devers paced the Red Sox in their 9-0 win. In game three, Mookie Betts hit his second leadoff home run of the series, only needing three pitches this time. Andrew Benintendi, who sat out game two, added a home run and 3 RBI to the team’s 8-2 win.

With their latest sweep, the Red Sox extend their win streak to seven games as their offense looks more dangerous by the day. In 18 games, Boston has scored 6 or more runs in 11 of them, and average a league-best 6.35 runs per game. They lead the MLB in hits (190), batting average (.292), on-base percentage (.362), slugging percentage (.496), runs (116), and extra-base hits (82). After not hitting a single grand slam in 2017, they already have four this year. Able to produce with contact or power, this dynamic offense is the real deal, and here to stay.

It Gets Better

Let us not forget about Xander Bogaerts and Dustin Pedroia, both sidelined due to injury. Bogaerts was proving to be a valuable cog in this offense, batting .368 before hurting his ankle. Pedroia hasn’t seen the field yet, but his value to this lineup is undeniable.

Bogaerts took batting practice on Tuesday and is expected to return sometime next week. Pedroia is still a couple weeks away from returning, nursing his knee after receiving surgery over the summer.

Clearly, these absences have not impacted Boston’s bats in the slightest. But with two important starters set to return over the next few weeks, Red Sox Nation has every reason to be excited about this commanding offense.

Pedro Martinez Hosts Charity Event

Former Boston Red Sox ace and World Series champion Pedro Martinez headlined thePedro Martinez “Rally for 45 fundraisers”, speaking about he and wife, Carolina’s, charity the ‘Pedro Martinez Foundation’. The fundraiser was held at ‘Hurricanes’ bar in Boston, on Sunday, April 15th. All proceeds raised during the event will go towards Pedro’s charity.

The charity benefits children in the Dominican Republic, Pedro’s native country, by providing them with food, getting an education, job training and more. Pedro came to Boston, his “second home”, to speak to the media about his charity, before the Boston Marathon. A tradition Martinez and Carolina hold near to their heart.

“Well, you know, Boston to me is my second home,” said Martinez. “I’m trying to raise money with everything Boston does. The marathon is no exception. I was a runner myself when I was a player. I was a big fan of running. The Boston Marathon is part of the tradition and the culture in Boston.

‘Hurricanes’ had memorabilia at the event that was auctioned off. Notable memorabilia consisted of a signed Lionel Messi jersey, a framed autographed portrait of both Magic Johnson and Larry Bird, a “Boston’s Best” autographed photo of both Tom Brady and David Ortiz and much more.

Pedro Martinez Talks Charity and Baseball

Martinez spoke adamantly of how much Carolina has helped with the charity.

“The biggest reason why we have these kids do well in society, is because of her,” Martinez said. “She is the heart and soul with what we have done. She’s the one that’s always in the middle of it. Its like when you go into a fight in baseball, she’s the catcher. The one who has your back. the one that holds the guy low, so that he doesn’t hit you. That’s my wife.

Pedro spoke on what it’s like working with the kids involved in his charity.

“That’s our reward (on charity work)”, said Pedro. “To see these kids develop into better human beings, better men, better women in society, this is really why you make the effort to go the extra mile. You see them develop and become professionals.”

Martinez Thoughts on Red Sox

“I was glad to see the little fire between the two teams (Red Sox and Yankees), said Martinez. “It brings back memories of my time when I was playing in Boston. It was good to see us stand up in front of the Yankees and actually compete with them the same time.

Pedro seems encouraged with how the Red Sox have done under new manager Alex Cora.

“I’m extremely excited about the team has started. Between working early on in spring training, with all those guys. And to keep them healthy. That has been the biggest reason why we are off to a good start. I think the team has all the tools to compete with any team in the big leagues. And we are confident, if we stay healthy, we are going to be in it with everybody.

To find more information regarding the charity and how to get involved, visit www.pedromartinezcharity.com

Quotes credited to Pedro Martinez foundation “Rally for 45” charity fundraiser

Mookie Betts Is Looking Every Bit Like the AL MVP

Since his first appearance on the MVP ballot three years ago, the question has notMookie Betts been if, but when Mookie Betts will take home one of the most coveted honors in Major League Baseball. Betts’ sophomore campaign in 2015 yielded a .291 batting average, 18 home runs, 77 runs batted in, and lots of optimism for this promising young outfielder.

In the following season, Mookie started turning heads and looked as deserving of the MVP as any. He drastically improved his numbers and played his way into his first All-Star Game as a starting outfielder. He also took home a Gold Glove, a Silver Slugger, and finished as the runner-up for American League MVP, falling just 45 points short of Mike Trout. His numbers regressed slightly in 2017 after batting a career-best .318 in 2016, but still returned to the All-Star Game and finished 6th in MVP voting. His play to begin the 2018 campaign has Mookie Betts emerging as a favorite to take home MVP honors at last.

Mookie Betts 2018 MVP?

Over the first eight games of the season, the Boston Red Sox were working on the best start in the history of the franchise. Mookie Betts’ bat, however, was nowhere to be found. After recording only one RBI on a lone solo home run in that eight-game span, Betts has since flipped the script entirely. In 31 games, the 25-year-old right fielder has swung his way into the league-lead for home runs (13), batting average (.360), runs (36), and slugging percentage (.825). This power surge has fueled Boston’s offense and helped the Red Sox maintain their top-two 25-10 record. It has also landed Mookie Betts in the history books.

On May 2nd, Betts returned to the starting lineup after hamstring tightness held him out for two games. Boston’s red-hot leadoff hitter picked up right where he left off. Betts hit three home runs for the second time this season, this time on a trio of solo dingers. The Red Sox’ 5-4 win against the Kansas City Royals was Betts’ fourth 3-HR game in his career, passing Ted Williams (3) for the most in franchise history.

No Signs of Mookie Monster Slowing Down

Just days after rejoining the lineup, Betts exited Sunday’s game when a throw from first base struck his right shoulder as he was heading to second base. This latest setback did not slow him down either, as he reprised his leadoff role in Boston’s next game on Tuesday. And he didn’t just return, he notched two hits against Yankee ace Luis Severino, including a clutch RBI triple that tied the game before the Yankees went back up for good.

Mookie Betts is on pace to hit over 60 home runs and drive in over 130 runs, out of the leadoff spot no less. He also leads the league in extra-base hits (26) and total bases (94). And with a spotless fielding percentage to top off his exceptional start to the season, he continues to prove himself as one of the most complete 5-tool players in Major League Baseball, and the early leader in the clubhouse for the American League MVP.

It’s Time to Trade Jackie Bradley Jr.

As much as I love the man, it’s time the Red Sox trade Jackie Bradley Jr. away. For years, I’ve been saying that Bradley Jr. only needed a few more years to develop his swing and improve his batting average. But he’s only hitting .173 as of May 8th. He’s also not hitting the home runs he used to hit. With over 500 games played and 1800 at-bats, his career average is only .235. While he’ll always have one of the best gloves in the American League, it’s clear Bradley Jr. is becoming a detriment rather than an asset to the Red Sox.

Last night’s game against the Yankees only solidified this notion. He went 0-3 against thetrade jackie bradley Yankees in a crucial 3-2 loss. In the month of May alone, Bradley Jr. has only two hits in twenty-three at-bats. According to ESPN, “Bradley’s .173 batting average and .528 OPS are better than only three qualified hitters in baseball.” So when does Dave Dombrowski say enough’s enough?

It’s not like the Red Sox need him anyway. J.D. Martinez could easily take his place, and he has one of the hottest bats in the American League right now. Bradley Jr.’s current WAR is -0.3 whereas Martinez’s is 1.6. Bradley Jr. has a .173 batting average vs. Martinez’s .346 as of May 9th. Martinez has eight home runs compared to Bradley Jr.’s two. If the math doesn’t make it clear who’s more valuable, that what can?

Trade Jackie Bradley Jr. for the Benefit of the Team

Trading Bradley Jr. would allow for stronger players to get more playing time and solidify the Red Sox’s lead in the AL East. Alex Cora could replace Bradley Jr. with J.D. Martinez in the outfield. Hanley Ramirez could become the designated hitter again, a role he thrived in. Cora could then replace Ramirez at first base with Gold Glove-winner Mitch Moreland.

Cora and Dombrowski can no longer keep giving Bradley Jr. more chances to improve his hitting. After so many seasons, it’s clear he’s never going to be a .300 hitter. If anything, his lack of offense is now a liability. If the Red Sox were to trade Jackie Bradley Jr., stronger players like Hanley Ramirez and Mitch Moreland would get more playing time, and they have great offensive numbers.

I love Jackie Bradley Jr., especially his glove, but if Dombrowski wants to win a third straight AL East title and go to the World Series, it’ll have to be without him.

The Big 50: The Men and Moments that Made the Boston Red Sox

Have you ever been at Fenway Park watching a game, and begin to wonder about the Red Sox’s team history? It’s not difficult to do. Signs, monuments, and vintage artifacts are seen throughout Fenway. Those relics of the past and present can (and do) catch people’s interest. With so many Red Sox history books out there though, which would you pick? Evan Drellich’s The Big 50: The Men and Moments that the Boston Red Sox, is a great book that gives brief but excellent details about the fifty biggest moments in Red Sox history.

With a forward written by former Red Sox player Kevin Youkilis, Drellich divides the book into fifty sections. EachThe Big 50 section spends about five or six pages detailing a famous event or player from the Boston Red Sox. What makes The Big 50 such a great book is that Drellich doesn’t just talk about Ted Williams, David Ortiz, and Manny Ramirez. Drellich discusses major events in the nation’s history, and how those events affected the Red Sox. For example, there’s an entire chapter about Ortiz’s famous words: “This is our F’ing city,” that details Ortiz’s message to Boston in the wake of the marathon bombing in 2013. Drellich also mentions Bucky “F–kin” Dent’s home run (still a sore subject in Beantown). While I think Drellich should have ranked Ted Williams #1 instead of #3, I still think his short bio of “The Splendid Splinter” is amazing.

The Big 50 is a Great Companion Book for Any Fan Going to Fenway

The book magnificently balances older history with more recent events in Red Sox history. Drellich spends time discussing Tony C, and 1986. He mentions more modern era players like Dustin Pedroia and Curt Schilling, too. I particularly like how Drellich includes quotes from interviews with players like Jim Rice, Jim Lonborg, and Theo Epstein. This book is one of the more thorough and detailed books about the Red Sox to come out in recent years. That’s not to discount other books about the team. But if fans are looking for something concise about Red Sox history without wanting to read a 500+ page book, the The Big 50 is perfect.

The Big 50 is an excellent book that no Red Sox fan should go without. It’s small enough to fit in a bag and take with you to Fenway Park. So whether you’re a die-hard fan like me, or just a casual fan, you’ll appreciate this book!

Yawkey Way Is No More – Who is Next?

Who is next?  When the PC Police, embodied as John Henry, asked the Boston Public Improvement Commission to change a street name because he has been “uncomfortable” with the Yawkey Way street sign outside his office window, then who isYawkey Way next?  When we start applying the morals (and I used that term loosely) of today to our own history then no one is in the clear.  Not Tom Yawkey, not George Washington, not Peter Faneuil, not Arthur Fiedler, not John Singleton Copley of Copley Square fame and I would bet every soybean dollar of John Henry’s family farms not his own family either.  Who wants that magnifying glass on their father, grandfather or even their own soul?  John Henry, do you?

Yawkey Way and John Henry’s Fallen Bostonian Park

So Henry is “uncomfortable” with Yawkey Way being Yawkey Way because Tom Yawkey was a racist?  Was he?  I don’t know because I did not know Tom Yawkey.  Then again, neither did John Henry.  I do know he was the owner who integrated last in the major leagues and had few non-white employees.  Let’s just assume that a man born in 1903 probably did have certain opinions about people of any color.  Why?  Because that was pretty much the norm of the day when Tom Yawkey lived.  Segregation was the norm.  Not mixing of the races was the norm.  Not wanting to mix the races was the norm.  Court ordered forced busing in Boston, to deal with the city’s continued segregation in its public schools, did not happen until 1974. Tom Yawkey died in 1976.  Tom Yawkey was loved in this city not because he may have held opinions that today we find “uncomfortable” but because we would not have the Boston Red Sox as a team if Tom Yawkey was not the owner.  He devoted himself and his finances to the Red Sox – in an era when no one wanted the team.  As a bequest in his will, he also established the Yawkey Foundation whose philanthropy goes beyond words.  They did not just give money to “white people” causes, by the way.  Ever think that maybe, just maybe, Tom Yawkey did what we hope all of us do in life?  Maybe just maybe he grew as a person.  Maybe the man of 1956 was not the man of 1976.  Maybe that is why he was mourned by this city.  But before John Henry’s PC Police minions start jumping up and down, I ask, what makes Tom Yawkey so special to John Henry’s PC Police?  Let us take a look at a few other Boston iconic names and places and see how they stand up.

If you walk from Park Street to Fenway, you probably walk through the Public Garden and pass the statue of George Washington, father of our Country.  Well in 2018 you can walk in the Public Garden, the first public botanical garden, but it was fenced for a reason, to keep the commoners out – they were over in the Boston Common, not the pristine Public Garden.  Anyway, even if we are somehow okay with that sectionalism, there is the George Washington statue, our first President riding a horse, as a great welcoming to Boston.  It was unveiled in 1869. A little irony there since the Civil War had ended four years earlier and well, George Washington was a major slave owner in Virginia.  He and his wife Martha owned hundreds of slaves.  Hundreds.  So as father of our country, do we hold him to the standards of today too, and tear down the statue like the hundreds of Lenin statues in Russia?  There is a fallen monument park in Moscow where the statues of hundreds of felled Soviet statues and busts now reside. Maybe John Henry can ask Boston to set aside a piece of the Common, or even better maybe Henry can donate a portion of his own land in Brookline, where we can place all of the felled Bostonian monuments?  We can call it John Henry’s Fallen Bostonian Park.

From Yawkey Way to Copley Square

Speaking of slave-owners, let’s talk about Peter Faneuil.  He both owned and traded slaves.  The money he made as a successful merchant, including of human cargo, paid for Faneuil Hall which he donated to the city of Boston.  As the National Park Service website states, ‘there is some irony to be found in its nickname however, because a portion of the money used to fund ‘The Cradle of Liberty’ came directly from the profits of the slave trade.”  So again, do we now refer to Faneuil Hall as, say, Old Boston Towne Market, because we need to suppress any history that makes us “uncomfortable”.  John Henry, are you on the Old Boston Towne Market name change bandwagon too?

Now Arthur Fiedler is synonymous with the 4th of July.  He brought music to the people, literally, which is why the footbridge and statue near the Hatch Shell is named after him.  He was like all of our grandfathers wrapped into one – a loving man who loved the people.  Fiedler gave us the Pops with its popular, traditional and classical music.  Yet his daughter wrote that he was a terrible father, who drank too much and who caused “wreckage” in their family.  Do we believe her every word?  Do we now see Fiedler as less of a Bostonian because his personal life was not as successful as his professional life?  Do we expect him to be perfect in order for him to be remembered fondly?  If so then we have another statue for John Henry’s Fallen Bostonian Park.

Closer on any walk to Fenway, will bring you to Copley Square.  The square is named for John Singleton Copley, renowned artist.  His square is next to the John Hancock building, which is also a bit ironic since Copley hated Hancock.  You see Copley was a Loyalist, who abhorred the Thirteen Colonies push for independence, also known as the American Revolution — so much so, that Copley sailed from Boston to England in 1774 and never returned.  Copley considered himself British.  Would have loved to have heard Sam Adams sitting in a pub in Colonial Boston verbally brandishing Copley as a traitor to the cause.  So do we now change the name of Copley Square back to the original name of Art Square because Copley never wanted America to be its own independent nation?  Do we ignore his talents as a premier artist, especially his portrait paintings of our Founding Fathers? John Henry, do we remove Copley’s name too to the Fallen Bostonian Park?

How This For Uncomfortable, John Henry?

This all began because John Henry was “uncomfortable” seeing the Yawkey Way street sign out his office window.  I wonder how Henry would fare if the microscope was placed on his life and business interests where every comment and decision is scrutinized ad nauseam.  We could begin by examining Henry’s great grandfather who emigrated from Londonderry, Northern Ireland and farmed in the slave state of Arkansas in the mid-1800s.  In addition, we could look at Henry’s grandfather and father’s soybean business in Arkansas and Illinois and see exactly how many people of color were employed.  We could even evaluate John Henry’s tenure with the Marlins and Red Sox and count the number of African-American, Hispanic, women and LGBTQ workers he had in high paying positions as Chairman and Owner.  No one wants that kind of spotlight, where the complete picture of someone’s life can so easily be lost.

The Yawkey Way sign being removed does not change racism or bring comfort to Boston or anywhere else.  History is not about comfort.  And our history as a city is not easy.  Yet we cannot learn from the past by whitewashing it away from public view like George Orwell in 1984, or because people are “uncomfortable”.  Errors and transgressions are part of our processes, it is how we learn and get better as people.  No human being would pass the perfection test, especially if we start placing the moral compass of today on times gone by.  If that is how we look at our city’s history, then each and every one of us would be relegated to John Henry’s Fallen Bostonian Park. Imagine how “uncomfortable” John Henry would be then.

This article was written by Maura Porter, Editor in Chief, Yawkey Way Report