Retired Red Sox Who Should Be in Cooperstown

Baseball fans from all walks of life love to debate which of their favorite non-Hall of Fame players should be enshrined in Cooperstown. Dodger fans want to see Gil Hodges and Maury Wills inducted. Mets fans want to see Davey Johnson in the Hall of Fame. Fans of the Negro Leagues want Buck O’Neil inducted for his contributions to baseball. But which  retired Red Sox players should be inducted in the Hall of Fame who haven’t made it in yet? Let’s take a look at the top three who the BBWAA voters have slighted over the years.

Retired Red Sox Star Pitcher Luis Tiant

There’s probably no one more deserving to be in the Hall of Fame than Luis Tiant. He wonretired red sox 229 games throughout his career. In his 1964 Major League debut against the New York Yankees, Tiant allowed only four hits (all singles). He also struck out eleven in the 3-0 debut shutout. Overall, he was a three-time All-Star and two-time ERA leader with 49 career shutouts. But his masterful performance in the 1975 World Series is what Red Sox fans remember him best for going 2-0, one of which was a shutout against the Reds. His numbers are better than many Hall of Fame pitchers and for that he should be a Hall of Famer.

Red Red Sox Star Outfielder Dwight Evans

His omission from Cooperstown is one of the more glaring mistakes the BBWAA has made in the last thirty years. Evans was a three-time All-Star, an eight-time Gold Glove winner, and a two-time Silver Slugger Award winner during his twenty-year career. He also accumulated over 2400 hits and slugged 385 home runs. His defense alone should have gotten serious consideration. The fact that was an offensive powerhouse too is why fans feel his absence in Cooperstown.

Retired Red Sox Star Infielder Johnny Pesky

I’ll admit that arguing that Pesky should be inducted is a little tougher than Tiant and Evans’ calls for induction. Pesky only played between 1942-1954. Pesky served three of those years in the military during World War II. He barely had any power either; he only hit 17 home runs in his career. But he accumulated 620 hits in his first three seasons in the Majors with 205, 208, and 207 hits, respectively. He coached some of the greatest Red Sox players in history, including Carl Yastrzemski, Jim Rice, Fred Lynn, and Johnny Damon. His hitting, coaching abilities, and legendary status in Boston, while not the strongest case for induction, make it hard to ignore him.

Red Sox Outfielder Fred Lynn

Lynn didn’t play for the Red Sox for his entire career. He did, however, achieve some of his best numbers while in Boston. Lynn won both the MVP, Rookie of the Year Awards in 1975, while also collecting a Gold Glove and making an All-Star appearance. Overall, he was a nine-time All-Star who hit 306 home runs during his seventeen-year career. While his numbers don’t quite rival those in the Hall of Fame, his rookie year accomplishments alone should have gotten him more consideration.

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