What To Make Of The Boston-Baltimore Conflict

Chris Sale wrote the latest chapter of the Boston-Baltimore conflict last night after throwing behind Manny Machado. This confrontation is the latest in a string of incidents between the two teams that began last month. The rivalry started in Baltimore on April 21st when Boston-Baltimore ConflictMachado slid into second and spiked Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedrioa. While it didn’t look intentional, it touched off a series of confrontations that have included beanings, throws to the head, and as of Monday, racist epithets, along with peanuts, thrown at Orioles centerfielder Adam Jones.

This Isn’t Your Old Fashioned Rivalry

The Red Sox are no strangers to rivalries. The Red Sox and Yankees have been at war with each other since 1912 when the Sox beat the Yankees, then the Highlanders, 7-6 in the first game at Fenway Park. Since then, the two teams have often battled for a playoff spot. Individual rivalries between catchers Carlton Fisk and Thurmond Munson kept the rivalry interesting. It’s since died down after the Red Sox won the 2004 World Series in 2004. But this newfound rivalry with the Orioles is rooted in misunderstanding and unfounded anger. What started as an intentional spiking unfolded into a national scene of unwanted and distracting attention. It’s not baseball at its best. It’s baseball at its worst.

The Boston-Baltimore Conflict Isn’t An Honest One

The Red Sox v. Yankees rivalry is an honest one because they often involved pitching duels, dramatic home runs, and tough base running altercations. With the exception of the 2004 game, the Red Sox and Yankees duke it out with pitching and hitting. This new rivalry with the Orioles is stupid because it’s based on machoism instead of honest baseball. Players on both sides don’t want to look weak or back down, so they take to beaning and throwing at each other to look tough. That’s not what baseball is all about.

Tuesday’s Game Exemplified What A Good Rivalry Should Look Like

Tuesday’s game was an exceptional one. Sale struck out eleven. Hanley Ramirez hit two home runs, one of which hasn’t landed yet. And in a most bizarre of plays, the Orioles competed their first triple play since 2000. While Sale sent a message to Machaco by throwing behind him, Machado returned the favor by blasting a home run off of him in the seventh. That’s what baseball is all about. With the exception of Sale’s immature throw behind Machado, fans on both sides saw old fashioned baseball. The game even finished under three hours, which is rare nowadays. The highlight of the game, however, is what should turn the Boston-Baltimore conflict towards a respectable one.

Adam Jones, subjected to horrible racist taunts the night before, came to the plate in the first. Fans in Fenway Park gave Jones a standing ovation as their way of showing support. It was also an effort from Red Sox Nation to show the rest of baseball that they’re better than what Jones endured the night before. While some dimwitted fans think that Jones exaggerated, the overwhelming ovation signified a strong show of respect. More importantly, it’s this writer’s hope that it’ll end the immature antics both teams are exhibiting and the rivalry will turn into a more honest form of baseball. Instead of throwing at each other, maybe the Red Sox and Orioles will start fighting each other with home runs and strikeouts.

The Red Sox and Orioles need to stop the macho crap and need to start focusing on real baseball. It’s not about beaning or “sending a message.” It’s about seeing who’s the better team.

Instances of Racism Haunt Fenway

Orioles outfielder Adam Jones claimed that he was the focus of racist taunts during Monday’s game at Fenway Park. A fan threw a bag of peanuts at him while others taunted him with racial slurs. While those fans were ejected, it’s another example of how instances of racism haunt Fenway Park. Not only are these instances ignorant and immature, but Racism Haunt Fenwaythey embarrass the City of Boston.

This isn’t the first instance of racism that Fenway has witnessed. Back in 1945 Jackie Robinson and two other Negro League players were given a try out at Fenway Park. Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey allegedly yelled from the stands “Get that nigger off the field!” when he saw Robinson. Yawkey, never known for his progressive views, was the owner when they became the last team to integrate in 1959 when Pumpsie Green joined the Red Sox. Ted Williams, himself a Mexican American, was one of the few players on the team who took the time to embrace his new teammate by asking him to warm up with him before a game. During his own induction speech, Williams called for the induction of Negro Leaguers in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Is There a Double Standard?

Many are saying that Jones’ claims aren’t valid. Some are even saying he’s lying or exaggerating. They argue that no one ever called David Ortiz those same slurs, so why should they believe Jones? That’s because Boston fans loved Ortiz. Jones, on the other hand, isn’t afraid to speak his mind. He’s known as someone who calls it the way he sees it, and instead of responding to his ideas in a mature way, people focus on his race to discredit him. Those people not only disrespect opposing viewpoints, but they can’t even form coherent responses. For them, it’s easier to shout something racist than it is to think of a logical and insightful opinion. Then again, Fenway’s a ballpark and not a university, so these types of instances shouldn’t be happening to begin with.

The particularly disgusting thing about this incident though is that people paid money to come to the ballpark and act this way. It’s fine if you want to boo him for being an Oriole. But throwing peanuts at him? You not only make yourself look stupid, but you give Boston a bad reputation.

Instances of Immaturity and Racism Haunt Fenway

Last Sunday I sat in the grandstand to watch the final series game between the Red Sox and Cubs. Sitting behind me was a twenty-something who clearly had had too much to drink. The immature, sexist, racist, and derogatory things he said right out loud during the game embarrassed me in front of our Chicago guests. This guy talked about his blatant use of women as objects, his drug habit, and didn’t refrain from using bad language around kids. He was your typical obnoxious fan whose beliefs and opinions reflect a low I.Q.

It’s bad enough that I have to deal with fans like this. But it’s worse when they become national news. If you’re going to be so stupid as to think your race is better than someone else’s, then stay home. Bostonians don’t want to hear what you have to say. As instances of racism haunt Fenway, instead of being a jerk, be that fan who screams with joy when Hanley Ramirez hits another homer over the Green Monster. And if you hear someone shouting something racist, tell them to shut up, or call security and let them handle it.