Yankee Fan Reacts To JBJ’s Catch With Bigotry

The Boston Red Sox played host to their arch-rival the New York Yankees this past weekend. The rivals split the four-game series 2-2 with the Red Sox still a few gamesYankee fan ahead of the Yankees. The series saw many highs and lows, including a blown save by Craig Kimbrel. The biggest highlight of the series though came during the fourth and final game Sunday night. In the top of the eighth, centerfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. robbed a home run from the Yankees’ Aaron Judge. While both Red Sox and Yankee fans behaved well in general during the series, one Yankee fan took to Instagram to voice his reaction to Bradley Jr.’s amazing catch. He wasn’t exactly subtle in his opinion about Bradley Jr., and it was caught by a Red Sox fan for all on Instagram to see.

Following the game, a Red Sox fan and Instagram user posted a snapshot to his storyline. The snapshot detailed a conversation between two Instagramers, one a Red Sox fan and another a Yankee fan. The Yankee-themed Instagram account has 12,000 followers while Red Sox-themed account has about 2300 followers. While the message in its entirety wasn’t available to read, the Red Sox fan mentioned how Jackie Bradley Jr. robbed Aaron Judge of a home run. In response, the Yankee fan wrote “Lucky catch from that n–ger coon.” The Red Sox fan screenshot the conversation with the tagline, “reeeeeal classy…trash Red Sox fans and then call JBJ that…” and posted it as an Instagram story. I reached out to both users for comment but neither responded. You can see the actual snapshot here.

Many of you who are reading this might wonder why I’m taking issue with this message. Some of you might shrug it off. Others might argue that it’s not worth talking about. Some might even say it’s stupid. But here’s why I think this is an important story to discuss.

Not Everyone Is Like This Yankee Fan, But They Exist Everywhere

Last April, the Baltimore Orioles’ Adam Jones found himself on the receiving end of racial taunts at Fenway Park. While most Red Sox fans reacted with anger and disgust, others carried on as if it was nothing. Some even said Jones needs to get over himself. But it’s that very attitude that enables this kind of behavior to begin with. People complain and say things like “I’m tired of everyone being so sensitive!” Others will say that they’re tired of these kinds of stories, racism will exist no matter what, free speech, etc. But here’s something people forget about. That’s a two way street.

Now, people are entitled to their beliefs, but keep in mind that others are entitled to respond. If someone isn’t ready to defend themselves without using racial slurs, then maybe he or she should just keep to themselves. More importantly, maybe they shouldn’t share their thoughts on social media.

Hey Yankee Fan, What You Post On Social Media Stays There Forever

It’s sad and pathetic that baseball has to suffer these fools who think it’s okay to bring their racist sentiments to the ballpark, or post them on social media. It’s as if they don’t notice the number 42 that hangs in every MLB ballpark. Jackie Robinson is the main reason why baseball could integrate in the first place. The amount of taunting he endured in his career led to his early death at 53. He sacrificed himself so others like him could play the great game. But here we are, seventy years later, and not only do we still have to listen to people throw the “n” word around, but even worse, we have to listen to them complain when someone calls them out on their bigotry. Again, two way street here.

Can’t We All Just Get Along?

Of course, not every Yankee fan shares these bigoted views. All of the Yankee fans I know don’t care what color skin someone is as long as they can play ball. But regardless of how you feel about this topic, I think we can all agree that it’s totally not okay to use racial slurs to describe someone like Jackie Bradley Jr.

This isn’t about being politically correct. This isn’t about being sensitive. And it’s not even about trying to pick a petty fight. It’s about calling fans out on their racism, whether it’s at the ballpark or on social media. Of course, there’s some issues that we can hotly debate all day long, like whether to play “God Bless America” at ballgames. Those are heathy debates where both sides can make valid points. But how do you defend someone who wrote those comments about Jackie Bradley Jr.? You can argue that Bradley Jr. isn’t deserving of a Gold Glove (although that’s hard to argue). You can argue that Bradley should spend more time on his hitting (true). But who in their right mind is going to argue that it’s okay for a Yankee fan to call him a “n–ger coon?” Yes, I could ignore it, but that’s hard to do when it’s posted to Instagram.

It’s About Defending One Of Our Own

I have no doubt that some of my readers are going to slam me for bringing this up. But before they do so, ask yourself a question. Am I angry about this blog post, or am I more angry about what some Yankee fan said about our centerfielder and how he said it? Who are you going to defend? A bigoted Yankee Fan? Or Jackie Bradley Jr.?

I leave you with a quote from a great Boston-themed movie The Boondock Saints, “Now, we must all fear evil men. But, there is another kind of evil which we must fear most … and that is the indifference of good men!”

Don’t be indifferent to this reality.

Is It Too Late For A Red Sox Recovery?

The Red Sox are struggling. Acquiring Chris Sale made many believe the Red Sox finally had the best rotation in the American League. But then David Price went on the DL. Rick Porcello stopped winning games. Another rash of injuries followed the Red Sox into the infield. Sprained legs, sore elbows, vertigo, and the flu wreaked havoc on the Red Sox. So is a Red Sox recovery possible?

We’re going into June and the Red Sox are stubbornly lodged in second place as of MayRed Sox Recovery 30th. While the Red Sox won the division last year, they suffered dismal seasons in 2014 and 2015. What’s even worse is that its not as much fun to watch the team this year. What’s driving this losing season and what needs to happen to stop it?

John Farrell Needs To Go

After he was pulled, Drew Pomeranz and John Farrell had a little blowup in the dugout a few weeks ago. Farrell pulled Pomeranz after only four innings, leading him to question his manager in an exchange caught on camera. Blowups between players and managers aren’t uncommon. But this isn’t the first time a pitcher openly questioned Farrell. Wade Miley and Farrell screamed it out in June of 2015 when Farrell pulled him after giving up five runs in four innings. Any good boss knows open insubordination signals a lack of respect. The fact that his players feel like they can do that is a sign that Farrell may not have as much control over his players as he should. Despite their recent success against Texas and Seattle, fans got to ask how long that insubordination will last.

Motivation (Or a Lack Thereof) is Hurting a Red Sox Recovery

The Boston Marathon bombing motivated the Red Sox to win the 2013 World Series. Since then, we’ve lost a lot of our A-Listers including David Ortiz. Now it seems like the Red Sox are like a ship without a rudder. They don’t have a sense of direction. It’s as if they don’t know what they’re doing or where they want to go.

Let Farrell go. Keeping him at this point is like dating someone you don’t like anymore. All you’re really doing is waiting for something to give. Then designate a new team captain. The team needs someone from within who can motivate the rest of the team.

It’s not too late to take first place and take the division. We’re not even at the All-Star break yet. So while a Red Sox recovery is possible, the team needs to cut the dead wood adrift.

What To Make Of The Boston-Baltimore Conflict

Chris Sale wrote the latest chapter of the Boston-Baltimore conflict last night after throwing behind Manny Machado. This confrontation is the latest in a string of incidents between the two teams that began last month. The rivalry started in Baltimore on April 21st when Boston-Baltimore ConflictMachado slid into second and spiked Red Sox second baseman Dustin Pedrioa. While it didn’t look intentional, it touched off a series of confrontations that have included beanings, throws to the head, and as of Monday, racist epithets, along with peanuts, thrown at Orioles centerfielder Adam Jones.

This Isn’t Your Old Fashioned Rivalry

The Red Sox are no strangers to rivalries. The Red Sox and Yankees have been at war with each other since 1912 when the Sox beat the Yankees, then the Highlanders, 7-6 in the first game at Fenway Park. Since then, the two teams have often battled for a playoff spot. Individual rivalries between catchers Carlton Fisk and Thurmond Munson kept the rivalry interesting. It’s since died down after the Red Sox won the 2004 World Series in 2004. But this newfound rivalry with the Orioles is rooted in misunderstanding and unfounded anger. What started as an intentional spiking unfolded into a national scene of unwanted and distracting attention. It’s not baseball at its best. It’s baseball at its worst.

The Boston-Baltimore Conflict Isn’t An Honest One

The Red Sox v. Yankees rivalry is an honest one because they often involved pitching duels, dramatic home runs, and tough base running altercations. With the exception of the 2004 game, the Red Sox and Yankees duke it out with pitching and hitting. This new rivalry with the Orioles is stupid because it’s based on machoism instead of honest baseball. Players on both sides don’t want to look weak or back down, so they take to beaning and throwing at each other to look tough. That’s not what baseball is all about.

Tuesday’s Game Exemplified What A Good Rivalry Should Look Like

Tuesday’s game was an exceptional one. Sale struck out eleven. Hanley Ramirez hit two home runs, one of which hasn’t landed yet. And in a most bizarre of plays, the Orioles competed their first triple play since 2000. While Sale sent a message to Machaco by throwing behind him, Machado returned the favor by blasting a home run off of him in the seventh. That’s what baseball is all about. With the exception of Sale’s immature throw behind Machado, fans on both sides saw old fashioned baseball. The game even finished under three hours, which is rare nowadays. The highlight of the game, however, is what should turn the Boston-Baltimore conflict towards a respectable one.

Adam Jones, subjected to horrible racist taunts the night before, came to the plate in the first. Fans in Fenway Park gave Jones a standing ovation as their way of showing support. It was also an effort from Red Sox Nation to show the rest of baseball that they’re better than what Jones endured the night before. While some dimwitted fans think that Jones exaggerated, the overwhelming ovation signified a strong show of respect. More importantly, it’s this writer’s hope that it’ll end the immature antics both teams are exhibiting and the rivalry will turn into a more honest form of baseball. Instead of throwing at each other, maybe the Red Sox and Orioles will start fighting each other with home runs and strikeouts.

The Red Sox and Orioles need to stop the macho crap and need to start focusing on real baseball. It’s not about beaning or “sending a message.” It’s about seeing who’s the better team.

Instances of Racism Haunt Fenway

Orioles outfielder Adam Jones claimed that he was the focus of racist taunts during Monday’s game at Fenway Park. A fan threw a bag of peanuts at him while others taunted him with racial slurs. While those fans were ejected, it’s another example of how instances of racism haunt Fenway Park. Not only are these instances ignorant and immature, but Racism Haunt Fenwaythey embarrass the City of Boston.

This isn’t the first instance of racism that Fenway has witnessed. Back in 1945 Jackie Robinson and two other Negro League players were given a try out at Fenway Park. Red Sox owner Tom Yawkey allegedly yelled from the stands “Get that nigger off the field!” when he saw Robinson. Yawkey, never known for his progressive views, was the owner when they became the last team to integrate in 1959 when Pumpsie Green joined the Red Sox. Ted Williams, himself a Mexican American, was one of the few players on the team who took the time to embrace his new teammate by asking him to warm up with him before a game. During his own induction speech, Williams called for the induction of Negro Leaguers in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Is There a Double Standard?

Many are saying that Jones’ claims aren’t valid. Some are even saying he’s lying or exaggerating. They argue that no one ever called David Ortiz those same slurs, so why should they believe Jones? That’s because Boston fans loved Ortiz. Jones, on the other hand, isn’t afraid to speak his mind. He’s known as someone who calls it the way he sees it, and instead of responding to his ideas in a mature way, people focus on his race to discredit him. Those people not only disrespect opposing viewpoints, but they can’t even form coherent responses. For them, it’s easier to shout something racist than it is to think of a logical and insightful opinion. Then again, Fenway’s a ballpark and not a university, so these types of instances shouldn’t be happening to begin with.

The particularly disgusting thing about this incident though is that people paid money to come to the ballpark and act this way. It’s fine if you want to boo him for being an Oriole. But throwing peanuts at him? You not only make yourself look stupid, but you give Boston a bad reputation.

Instances of Immaturity and Racism Haunt Fenway

Last Sunday I sat in the grandstand to watch the final series game between the Red Sox and Cubs. Sitting behind me was a twenty-something who clearly had had too much to drink. The immature, sexist, racist, and derogatory things he said right out loud during the game embarrassed me in front of our Chicago guests. This guy talked about his blatant use of women as objects, his drug habit, and didn’t refrain from using bad language around kids. He was your typical obnoxious fan whose beliefs and opinions reflect a low I.Q.

It’s bad enough that I have to deal with fans like this. But it’s worse when they become national news. If you’re going to be so stupid as to think your race is better than someone else’s, then stay home. Bostonians don’t want to hear what you have to say. As instances of racism haunt Fenway, instead of being a jerk, be that fan who screams with joy when Hanley Ramirez hits another homer over the Green Monster. And if you hear someone shouting something racist, tell them to shut up, or call security and let them handle it.