Red Sox Walkoff In Back to Back Games Over Phillies

The Sox are coming off of a two-game stretch against the Philadelphia Phillies in which the Red Sox Walkoffteam took home back to back walkoff wins. Fenway Park was buzzing on Monday and Tuesday night when Boston came away victorious in a couple of extra-inning affairs. The hero on Monday night was Dustin Pedroia, while the clutch hitter of the night on Tuesday was Andrew Benintendi. These wins are more than just a W in the column. Walkoffs not only raise confidence, but also team chemistry and usually performance catches a boost as well. The Red Sox walkoff wins should do just that.

Red Sox Walkoff Against Phillies Monday Night

On Monday night, the Red Sox trailed 4-0 after the first inning. Rick Porcello has unfortunately continued to struggle in finding a rhythm this season. The Sox did manage to battle back though, as Mookie Betts went for 3 doubles on the night and Benintendi had 3 hits. In the eleventh inning, the stage was set as Dustin Pedroia lined a ball past the second baseman Howie Kendrick. Devin Marrero score the game winning run on a head-first slide, and the celebration ensued.

Red Sox Walkoff Again on Tuesday

Fast forward to Tuesday night where Boston and Philladelphia played very evenly, matching each other with a 3-3 score in the 6th. That score would stay the same until the 12th until Andrew Benintendi came to the plate. The young Red Sox outfielding phenom ripped the ball down the right field line, scoring Xander Bogaerts and walking off for the second night in a row. Xander led the way with three hits while Mitch Moreland hit his ninth home run of the season.

What Do the Red Sox Walkoff Wins Mean?

I’m not sure why this team likes to give the fans so much stress sometimes, but a win is still a win. No matter how good we look on paper, this is still baseball where anyone can win on any day. In a league where the Cubs can lose three out of four to the Rockies, anything can happen. As long as the Sox get the win, that is really all that matters. They just have to make sure they compete against the great teams in our league, as well as the bad.

Red Sox’ Winning Streak Has Fans Excited Again

The hometown heroes have won their last five games (as of May 27th). They have scored a whopping 41 Red Sox' Winning Streakruns in those games while opposing teams have mustered just 15. The Red Sox’ record as of May 27th sits at 26-21, which is the highest amount of games over .500 it has been all year. The recent outburst has been an all-around team effort, from the hitting to the fielding and everything in between. The Red Sox’ winning streak has been a proponent of very good pitching, especially starting pitching.

The Red Sox’ Winning Streak Has Been Led By Pitching

Eduardo Rodriguez has pitched two great games during this 5-game streak. He gave up 3 earned runs over 8 innings in Oakland last Sunday, and beat the Mariners on Friday giving up no runs in 6 innings, (4-1, 2.77 ERA). The Sox were coming off a game that they pitched rather well in too, when they tied the MLB record for strikeouts in a game with a combined 20. Drew Pomeranz pitched a gutty game, striking out 11 en route to the win. Craig Kimbrell struck out 4 in the ninth due to a dropped-third strike, while a combination of Hembree, Barnes, and Scott collected 5 punch-outs. Though Chris Sale was unable to break his own record (in which he shares with Pedro) for the most consecutive starts with 10+ strikeouts, the Sox still won. Sale’s three earned runs over 7.1 got the job done.

What Hitting Has Meant To the Red Sox’ Winning Streak

The Red Sox are finding ways to win. They have proved in the last few years that they can beat any team. They did exactly that against a hot Texas Rangers team. The starting pitching held the Rangers’ bats in check while guys like Andrew Benintendi and Xander Bogaerts collected RBI. Xander left the yard for the first time this season, and is hitting a whopping .335 on the season. This is just the start we needed out of him, and his power stroke may have finally returned. Look for this team to stay hot if they can stay healthy, as the return of David Price will hopefully galvanize the club, as well.

Jalen Beeks Continues Eastern League Dominance

In a farm system notorious for developing young players, southpaw Jalen Beeks now finds himself as one of the organization’s top pitching prospects. At age 23, the 5’11” hurler has done nothing but produce since joining the Double-A Portland Sea Dogs.jalen beeks

Like Andrew Benintendi, Beeks attended Arkansas. While a Razorback, Beeks also excelled, boasting a 1.07 WHIP and a 1.98 ERA in 81.2 IP his senior year. This impressive performance followed an elbow injury his junior year.

He was drafted in the 12th round in 2014. He played two-and-a-half seasons of rookie ball and A-ball. Beeks was called up to Portland in July 2016 and finished the season 5-4 with a 4.68 ERA in 65.1 innings pitched. This was after going 4-4 in 13 starts with a 3.07 ERA for High-A Salem.

But this season, he has been nothing but dominant. In seven starts, Beeks is 5-1 with a 1.60 ERA and 48 strikeouts in 39.1 innings pitched. He’s averaging almost six innings per start and 1.2 strikeouts per inning. And if it wasn’t for one start against Trenton back in April, Beeks would be 5-0 with an ERA of 0.51.

Baseball Mechanics and Jalen Beeks

Scouts look to his mechanics as a way to marginalize hitters. SoxProspects.com’s scouting report says Beeks “throws from the first-base side of the rubber. High three-quarters arm slot and stiff delivery with a lot of moving parts. Utilizes a high leg kick, then trunk twist and pause as he rocks back before coming forward. He also has an arm hook behind and lands stiff on his front side.”

When combined with Trey Ball and Teddy Stankiewicz, Beeks solidifies Portland’s rotation as one of the best in the Eastern League. The three starters have combined for a 2.91 ERA this season, and have led Portland in an already tight division race.

As for Beeks, however, his performance thus far is nothing short of spectacular. And while the Red Sox may call on Triple-A journeyman for rotation help, the young lefty could soon be called up to Pawtucket.

The pride of Prairie Grove, AR will strive to continue his dominance of the Eastern League.

Red Sox Change Starting Lineup To Beat Cubs

To say that the Red Sox are struggling to score this season is an understatement. So it only made sense to see the Red Sox change the starting lineup before playing the Chicago Cubs. The Chicago Cubs’ visit to Fenway this week is only their third since 1918.Red Sox Change In a repeat of the 1918 World Series, the Red Sox beat Chicago 5-4 in the first of a three-game series. Seeing Boston beat the defending World Series champs was delightful. More importantly, it came as a relief to the fans of Red Sox Nation.

Last week the Red Sox dropped two to the Orioles followed by searing losses to the Yankees. In response, the Red Sox made changes to their startling lineup to stop the bleeding. In their first game with a new lineup, Dustin Pedrioa hit 6th for the first time ever. Xander Bogaerts hit leadoff followed by Andrew Benintendi hitting second. Whatever influenced the Red Sox to change to the starting lineup was effective. Despite giving up a home run to Kris Bryant, Drew Pomeranz kept the rest of the Cubs at bay until the Red Sox offense kicked in. He didn’t have to wait long.

In the bottom of the first, Benintendi hit a home run into the Red Sox bullpen to tie the game 1-1. By the end of the first inning, Boston was on top 5-1. Twitter and Facebook lit up with posts exclaiming “Good morning, bats!” It wasn’t just that the Red Sox change to the lineup was effective, it worked against reigning World Series Champs.

Pomeranz’s Domination Another Unexpected Red Sox Change

Drew Pomeranz was less than stellar last season. Despite making the 2016 National League All-Star team, Pomeranz struggled in Boston by going 3-5 with a 4.59 ERA in the second half of the season. But he’s 2-1 in four starts so far this season. While pitchers like Rick Porcello and Chris Sale struggle to get the run support they need, Pomeranz is learning how to hold his own.

Now that the Red Sox know that changes to their lineup can be effective, hopefully their pitching rotation can change too. Pitchers like Porcello and Steven Wright have a lot of adjusting to do, but looking at the way their teammates are adapting to change might give them a few ideas of their own. That might include skipping Wright and Porcello in favor for Eduardo Rodriguez or someone from AAA. That would given Porcello and Wright some time off to rethink their strategies.

Top Ten Current Red Sox Players: Part 2

In part two of this series, I will continue to look at the top ten Red Sox players on the roster in all positions. The rankings are based mainly on performances from 2016 and early 2017.

Top Ten Red Sox Players

  1. Craig Kimbrel.

 He joined the Red Sox as part of a blockbuster trade in November 2015. Since then Craigred sox players Kimbrel has had an immediate impact on the club’s late-game success. Some may be quick to point out the walks or the non-save situations. But he converted 31 out of 33 save opportunities in 2016 and has a career ERA of 1.86. So far in 2017, he has seven saves in the Red Sox total 11 wins.

  1. Xander Bogaerts

            There is no doubt that the Aruban shortstop will be a stud for years. Bogaerts has become a solid defender in recently. This season, Bogaerts is second on the team in average and is set to drive up the RBI total because of where he bats in the lineup. The only question that remains is how likely the Red Sox are to resign him. Bogaerts is a Scott Boras client.    

  1. Andrew Benintendi

            Almost every scout in baseball agreed that Benintendi was the number one prospect entering the year. Maybe it is premature to slate him as the third best player on the Red Sox, but with the maturity and poise he has, it’s deserving. Although he has struggled in some clutch situations, the 22-year-old outfielder is batting .361 on the season with 26 hits in 18 games. Recently against the Orioles, he had a five-hit game.

  1. Chris Sale

            Considering the price spent to acquire Sale and his tremendous track record, Red Sox fans should keep having high hopes for the tall lefty. In four starts, Sale has an ERA under one and 42 strikeouts. That is 19 higher than any other teammate. This is an average of 10.5 K’s per start. If he can get some more run support from the offense and benefit from the return of Price, then we’re looking at another Cy Young Award run in Boston.

  1. Mookie Betts

Personally, I was appalled that Betts did not win the American League MVP in 2016 because he led the league or was ranked in so many categories, including runs, batting average, doubles, and RBI. Not to mention his repeated multi-home run games. So because of his ability to change the game at the plate and his acrobatic defense, Betts is the best player on the Red Sox.

Too Much Pressure for Benintendi?

Andrew Benintendi broke in with the Red Sox late last season and quickly proved his worth. It was inevitable that he’d make it to Boston, but no one thought it would be so quick. The swiftness with which he rose through the minors concerned some whoBenintendi thought it was too fast. Fortunately, Benintendi proved them wrong. In 34 games in 2016 he hit .295 with fourteen extra base hits. He even hit a home run in the ALDS against Cleveland. While he is off to a strong start this season, some are asking the question, “Is Benintendi under too much pressure?”

It’s a valid question. After all, Benintendi is only 22-years old. He couldn’t even legally drink when he started his professional career. Playing everyday is a lot of pressure for anyone, let alone a rookie. Just ask Fred Lynn.

A few weeks ago I sat down with former Red Sox centerfielder Fred Lynn. As many of you remember, Lynn won the 1975 AL Rookie of the Year AND MVP awards, the only player ever to do so in the same year. He also won a Gold Glove and made an All-Star appearance, the first of nine. But he told me that he expected to do even better the following year. While he went on to collect a batting title in 1979, Lynn recalled some challenges that came along. “I was not a big guy and I thought maybe if I put on some weight or get some more muscle…,” Lynn told me. “But…the variable for me always was if I could stay healthy enough to do what I could do…that bar was set pretty high, and I didn’t mind that because I set my own bar pretty high.”

Benintendi set his own bar high too. Otherwise he wouldn’t be where he is today. However, that doesn’t mean that fans and writers alike aren’t setting it even higher.

With Benintendi Under Pressure, How’s He Adjusting?

Benintendi played the first and third games against Baltimore last weekend, but sat out the second. There was a southpaw on the mound in the second game, which didn’t bode well for Benintendi. But I think the other reason why John Farrell benched Benintendi was because Baltimore’s pitchers had figured out how to get him out. Twice Benintendi hit into a double play. While it happens to everyone, if you look at footage of Benintendi’s swing, he has a ways to go towards adjusting his swing to counter the way pitchers are going to throw to him. Pitchers and hitters trying to get the upper hand over each other is a never-ending battle. It’s even harder this day in age with all the access to footage players can review and study.

Seeing Benintendi under pressure is tough, but that’s baseball. If he’s smart, and I’m sure he is, he’ll learn how to adjust. Meanwhile, Farrell is smart to bench him against southpaws and insert someone like Josh Rutledge, who has his own potential.