The Travis Shaw Situation

The buzz around Yoan Moncada reached a fever pitch this week as he was called up to the Red Sox on Thursday. Moncada was the #1 prospect in all of baseball and, like Andrew Benintendi, skipped AAA. Moncada signed as a second baseman, but has had to change to third base to fill the Red Sox needs. So where does that leave Travis Shaw?

Shaw was one of the hottest stories for the Red Sox coming into the season, replacing ShawPablo Sandoval in the starting lineup. Shaw was exactly what Sox fans were looking for. Sandoval showed up way out of shape and after a tough 2015 season, fans were certainly writing him off. Shaw, on the other hand, was never a top prospect and took the job away from Sandoval with an impressive spring training.

Shaw’s 2016 Season

To begin the 2016 season, Shaw raised a lot of eyebrows around New England and the baseball world. In April, he was scorching the ball, hitting .314 with 27 hits and 15 RBI. The formidable numbers did not cease there as he hit five homers in May and brought his RBI total to 35. His power surge even earned him the nickname “The Mayor of Ding Dong City.” Shaw was anything but an easy out in the bottom half of the order, and was also sure-handed at the hot corner.

After that, the numbers have steadily dwindled. He hit just .214 in June and brought his average all the way down to .269 before the All-Star break. August was the low point for Shaw, as he hit an abysmal .167 with 12 hits and six RBI all month. In fact, since the All-Star break, shaw has hit just .205 with six homers and 18 RBI.

Moncada’s season has been quite the opposite of Shaw’s. In two different minor leagues this season, Moncada has done nothing but produce. He hit .294 with 15 homers and 52 extra-base hits. The 21-year old Cuban also stole 45 bases with a .918 OPS and 207 total bases. Moncada has even drawn comparisons to Mike Trout and Bo Jackson for his athleticism and instincts.

Now that we’ve actually seen Moncada play in real games, it is easy to see he was a better investment than fellow Cuban Rusney Castillo. It seems everything Moncada has done, he’s done it well. With that, the reign of “The Mayor” may soon end in Boston.

Red Sox Not Likely To Sign Tim Tebow

I’m not a big football fan. The Penn State sex abuse scandals and the neurological issue highlighted by the film Concussion turned me off to the game. But I find it interesting when an athlete jumps from one sport to another. So I found it intriguing when I heard the rumor that the Red Sox might sign Tim Tebow.

It’s rare to see athletes jump from one sport to another, but it’s not rare. The mostsign Tim Tebow famous two-sport athlete, Bo Jackson, showed the world that he was more than proficient in both baseball and football. During his career, Jackson was an All-Star, All-Star MVP, 1993 AL Comeback Player of the Year, and had four 20+ home run seasons. In his rookie football season, on 81 carries, Jackson rushed for a total of 554 yards, averaging 6.8 yards per carry (I assume that’s good). Other athletes who played two sports include Deion Sanders. Sanders played baseball for the Cincinnati Reds and New York Yankees, while also playing football. Then there’s Michael Jordan, who in 1994 retired from basketball to play baseball.  He hit a paltry .202 playing Double-A ball in the Southern League.

Now we have Tim Tebow.

I remember years ago when people gave him a hard time for Tebowing. I thought it was stupid that people got so worked up about it. Many football fans shrugged off the Penn State abuse scandal. Those same fans didn’t seem to care about players who beat their wives either. But a lot of them flipped when Tebow spoke out about his religious views. So what? Personally, I thought it was cool. He believes in something important to him and wasn’t afraid to show it. But it’s going to take more than his faith in God to get to the Major Leagues.

Would A Team Sign Tim Tebow To Boost Tickets Sales?

Tebow might be an amazing athlete, but it takes a lot more than muscle and speed to play the game of baseball. Tebow last played competitive baseball at Nease High in Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida in 2005. High school baseball eleven years ago? Yes, that’s the extent of his experience. And while he can run the dash faster than the average baseball player at 6.8 seconds, there’s hitting, throwing, and quick-decision making that will truly test Tebow if he’s signed to a contract.

Are the Red Sox one of the teams seriously pursuing Tebow? Not really. In a NESN interview, Red Sox President of Baseball Operations Dave Dombrowski stated, “We did our due diligence. I don’t want to say anything negative because other teams are looking at [Tebow], but I don’t think we’ll be rushing out to make a signing.”

Not exactly a sign of confidence.

Not only would Tebow have to get in line behind the hundreds of other minor leaguers trying to make it to the show, but he doesn’t have much to add defensively. Professional baseball is stocked plenty with outfielders, especially the Red Sox, and that’s the only position Tebow can really play. Additionally, Tebow will face a lot of resentment from those in baseball who know he used his status as a football hero to bypass the system.

It’s a good thing that Dombrowski doesn’t want to sign Tim Tebow right away. He might help ticket sales, but I doubt the Red Sox are lacking in that department anyway. If anything, he’d be a distraction, and that’s the last thing the Red Sox need right now.