Steve Selsky Rejoins Reds After Released By Red Sox

The Boston Red Sox have released outfielder Steve Selsky before the start of the season. Now the outfielder has returned to the Cincinnati Reds organization on a minor league contract.

Selsky made the Red Sox’s Opening Day roster last season, mainly to fill a space left open due to injuries. He went 1-for-9 with a double and five strikeouts in eight games during the first month of the season.

He was optioned to Triple-A Pawtucket on April 28, 2017, where he spent the rest of the season. The 28-year-old hit .215/.270/.360 with 11 home runs in 322 plate appearances.

A Look Back At Steve Selsky’s Career

The Colorado Rockies were the first team to draft him in 2010. He chose to remain in college. The Cincinnati Reds drafted him out of the University of Arizona in the 33rd round in 2011 after an injury-plagued season with the Wildcats.

Selsky moved up the ladder of the Reds organization and reached Triple-A Louisville in his fourth pro season. 2015 was looking to be the year he was supposed to make his MLB debut, but an injury ended his season early.

Selsky got the big league call-up to Cincinnati on May 20, 2016, in a season where he batted .284 with nine home runs and 37 RBI in 85 games for the Louisville Bats. He batted .314 over 24 games (16-for-51) with the Reds.

The Reds designated Selsky for assignment after the 2016 season to make room on the 40-man roster. The Red Sox claimed him on waivers soon after.

Selsky was known as someone who can hit for average. His highest minor league batting average was .348 over 69 games with the Bakersfield Blaze in 2014. We can all agree that was a nice season.

Unfortunately for Selsky, he wasn’t able to hit for average in Pawtucket. He elected for free agency after the 2017 season but opted to return. There’s a good chance another organization will bring him in. He can certainly help out a Triple-A team.

 

Red Sox Prospect Preview: Chad De La Guerra

There are 12 baseball players from Grand Canyon University to have made their MLB debuts. The most famous and successful of them all is longtime Los Angeles Angels outfielder Tim Salmon. The next Lope to add his name to the list may just be Chad De La Guerra.

Chad De La GuerraThe infielder is the Boston Red Sox’s No. 25th ranked prospect by hitting a career-high slash line of .283/.361/.437. He was eligible for four straight MLB Drafts from 2011-14; first as a high school senior in California, as a Junior College freshman, then as a sophomore in College of the Canyons (also in Calif.) and finally as a junior in the Phoenix-based GCU, but went unselected each year.

At GCU, De La Guerra won the Western Athletic Conference batting title with a .373 average in 2014. He went on a 24-game hitting streak during his senior season in 2015. He finally got the respect he was looking for and was rewarded by the Red Sox with a $5,000 signing bonus and a 17th round selection.

De La Guerra struggled during his first two seasons in pro ball, hitting only .265 for the Lowell Spinners in 2015 and .250 for the Greenville Drive in 2016. Fracturing his lower leg that season didn’t help much either. After a career year between Single-A Salem and Double-A Portland, there’s hope for more this season.

Is De La Guerra The Next Brock Holt?

De la Guerra spent most of last season at shortstop as a way to expand towards a utility role. He also saw action at third base in the Arizona Fall League. He has demonstrated to be a capable and steady defender with sure hands but an average arm.

De la Guerra is clearly working towards a niche as the next Eduardo Nunez, a utility infielder who can land a starting role if he can hit for high average. If he ever learned to play in the outfield, he could also become the next Brock Holt. Holt was an All-Star in 2015 and could hit for average no matter where he played on the diamond. So that would be a good place to strive for.

De la Guerra will be starting the season in Triple-A Pawtucket, along with Sam Travis and Tzu-Wei Lin.

Red Sox Top Prospect Michael Chavis Suspended 80 Games

MLB has announced that Boston Red Sox top prospect Michael Chavis has suspended for 80 games after testing positive for a prohibited performance-enhancing substance, dehydrochlormethyltestosterone.Michael Chavis

Chavis was coming off a career-high 31 home runs last season split between Single-A Salem and Double-A Portland. Before 2017, his career total for home runs was 25, which spanned over three seasons.

An oblique injury kept Chavis from showcasing his ability against Major League pitching in spring training. He is still on the disabled list. Once he returns from his suspension, he is expected to start in Portland and finish in Pawtucket.

Michael Chavis Was Expected To Become The Next Rafael Devers

Rafael Devers started last season in Portland and finished at the hot corner for the Red Sox in the ALDS. Since then, wondering eyes have shifted towards the Sea Dogs expecting another prospect to emerge as a rookie phenom. Chavis has positioned himself to be the Devers of this year after hitting more home runs than any other Red Sox minor leaguer.

Chavis can generate a lot of bat speed through his natural strength. What makes him special is he doesn’t have to use his full power to launch balls over the fence. He has also been able to hit for average once he stopped trying to pull everything out for a homer.

With third base blocked by Devers, Hanley Ramirez and Mitch Moreland taking up first base and J.D. Martinez locking up the DH spot, the plan this season might be to move Chavis to second base.  At that position, he could develop into a Jedd Gyorko/Dan Uggla type.

It wouldn’t be a new experience for Chavis, who was a shortstop in high school before making the switch to third base at the beginning of his pro career. As a high school senior in Marietta, GA, Chavis paved his path to the first round of the 2014 MLB Draft with power. by winning the home run derby at the 2013 Perfect Game All-American Classic and by batting .580 with 13 homers in 28 games.

Sea Dogs Celebrate 25 Years In Portland

The Portland Sea Dogs began in 1994 as the Double-A affiliate of the Florida Marlins. For the first nine years of their existence, the Sea Dogs housed and groom future members of the Marlins two World Series title teams.

Charles Johnson, Edgar Renteria, Livan Hernandez, Antonio Alfonseca and Luis Castillo went from Portland to helping the Marlins win their first championship in 1997. Josh Becket, Brad Penny, A.J. Burnett, Alex Gonzalez and Mike Redmond followed through with a banner of their own.

While Kevin Millar played for the Sea Dogs during the Marlin era, he joined the Boston Red Sox in 2003. That was also the same year the Red Sox made the Sea Dogs their Double-A affiliate. Miller helped Boston break their title curse in 2004.

While commemorating a quarter century of baseball is certainly a milestone worth celebrating, it took the players by surprise. It wasn’t until he saw the anniversary patch on his brand spanking new cap that outfielder Danny Mars realized this season was going to be special.

“I love Portland,” Mars said. “I’m sure (the Sea Dogs) are going to be around for way more than 25 years.

“Once it warms up,” he said, “the atmosphere gets a little bit nicer. the fans sell out every game and they get loud. It gets rocking. My favorites are the Sunday day games, Sells out every time. It’s always beautiful weather. I don’t think we ever had a Sunday rain out. It’s a great baseball vibe.”

Prospect To Keep An Eye On: Mike Shawaryn

Mike Shawaryn finished his collegiate career as Maryland’s record-holder for single-season and career wins (13 and 30) and strikeouts (138 and 307). He fell out of first round consideration after a down season during his junior year.

Shawaryn got Boston’s attention with a 16-strikeout complete game in the Big Ten Conference tournament. It was his final college start and it was rewarded with a signing bonus worth $637,500. The former fifth round selection ranked ninth among the Red Sox’s top 30 prospects, according to MLB Pipeline. 

Shawaryn ranked ninth in the Minors in strikeouts (169) and 11th in strikeout rate (11.3 per nine innings) in his first professional season.

 

MLB in London? Focus on U.S First!

A few weeks ago, it was reported that Major League Baseball is finalizing an agreement that will bring baseball to London. Yes, you read that correctly— the MLB in London! If agreed upon, the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees would play a two-game series at London’s Olympic Stadium on June 29-30 in 2019. The games would be the first regular season contests that the MLB has played in Europe. Clearly, this is being done in an effort to grow the game on that continent.MLB in London

Personally, I think the MLB needs to think about this for a second. It’s not an awful idea, but I think the priority should be growing the game at home in the United States first. Baseball has been losing popularity in the states for a long time now, especially along the younger generation. I feel like a weirdo when I tell friends that I like to sit down and watch a baseball game. That’s not a good thing.

Forget MLB in London, For Now

Instead of taking care of that problem and finding some way to fix baseball here, Rob Manfred and company want to move on to something they aren’t ready for. They are just following in the NFL’s footsteps by forcing London games down everyone’s throats and that’s barely even working for football, which is insanely popular.

My last issue with this is the fact that they are sending the Red Sox and Yankees. I get that they want to send a good product. You do not want to do what Roger Goodell does to the good people of London by subjecting them to crappy teams. This is not the right two to send, however. Baseball’s popularity is down largely because of pace of play and everyone’s short attention spans. That means we should not introduce the game to London by sending them these two teams. They notoriously play the longest games against each other. If you want to send the Yankees or the Sox, send them against someone else. Otherwise, we’ll be getting shots of the fans there filing out in the sixth inning after three hours.

Sox Pitching Shows Glimpse Of How Good It Can Be

We are just five games into the 2018 season, but right now things look good for the Red Sox. We’ve seen one turn through the starting rotation so far and although it doesn’t mean much, there is reason for optimism. The pitching so far has shown us a glimpse of just how good it could be. In five games, the Red Sox have given up a total of 12 runs. Half of those runs came in thePitching first game alone when Joe Kelly and Carson Smith melted down to ruin Chris Sale’s gem. Out of the 12 runs, only three have been given up by the starters. Making it even more impressive is that the two men at the back end are not the usual guys. Hector Velazquez and Brian Johnson did their jobs to come in and be not just effective, but very good, in spot-starts.

At the front end of the rotation, we saw Chris Sale, David Price and Rick Porcello form a three-headed monster in consecutive starts for the first time since they’ve been together. Again, it’s too early to get excited but things have certainly looked encouraging.

The one thing you can come back and challenge about this is the fact that they are facing anemic lineups. The Rays and Marlins both look like Triple-A clubs, which may have something to do with the lack of offense. If you want to look at it that way, that’s perfectly fine and consistent with being a Boston sports fan. However, all you can ask is for the Sox to take care of business against whomever the opponent is. That is what they have done thus far.

The next go-round for the rotation will be similar as Sale will get the Marlins tomorrow to kick it off. After that it’ll be Price, Porcello and Velazquez going against Tampa Bay in the opening series at Fenway. Finally, Brian Johnson will face a test against the New York Yankees next week. That’s when we’ll start to get a gauge on how things are going to go on the mound.