Steve Selsky Rejoins Reds After Released By Red Sox

The Boston Red Sox have released outfielder Steve Selsky before the start of the season. Now the outfielder has returned to the Cincinnati Reds organization on a minor league contract.

Selsky made the Red Sox’s Opening Day roster last season, mainly to fill a space left open due to injuries. He went 1-for-9 with a double and five strikeouts in eight games during the first month of the season.

He was optioned to Triple-A Pawtucket on April 28, 2017, where he spent the rest of the season. The 28-year-old hit .215/.270/.360 with 11 home runs in 322 plate appearances.

A Look Back At Steve Selsky’s Career

The Colorado Rockies were the first team to draft him in 2010. He chose to remain in college. The Cincinnati Reds drafted him out of the University of Arizona in the 33rd round in 2011 after an injury-plagued season with the Wildcats.

Selsky moved up the ladder of the Reds organization and reached Triple-A Louisville in his fourth pro season. 2015 was looking to be the year he was supposed to make his MLB debut, but an injury ended his season early.

Selsky got the big league call-up to Cincinnati on May 20, 2016, in a season where he batted .284 with nine home runs and 37 RBI in 85 games for the Louisville Bats. He batted .314 over 24 games (16-for-51) with the Reds.

The Reds designated Selsky for assignment after the 2016 season to make room on the 40-man roster. The Red Sox claimed him on waivers soon after.

Selsky was known as someone who can hit for average. His highest minor league batting average was .348 over 69 games with the Bakersfield Blaze in 2014. We can all agree that was a nice season.

Unfortunately for Selsky, he wasn’t able to hit for average in Pawtucket. He elected for free agency after the 2017 season but opted to return. There’s a good chance another organization will bring him in. He can certainly help out a Triple-A team.

 

Will Hunter Greene Be The Number One Draft Pick?

I would like to look ahead into the future of baseball with the 2017 MLB Draft fast Hunter Greene Draft Pickapproaching. With the first overall pick, the Minnesota Twins are expected to rather select HS RHP/SS Hunter Greene, 1B/LHP Brendan McKay (Louisville), or RHP Kyle Wright (Vanderbilt). The Twins’ selection will be followed by picks from the Reds’ and Padres’ organizations. Each of these organizations will be looking to select a franchise player. Since he seems to be the center of attention, we are going to take a look at the Notre Dame High School attending phenom, Hunter Greene.

Hunter Greene Is Not A Risky Draft Pick

Though there has never been a right-handed pitcher taken as the number-one overall selection before, Greene is a player that would thrive in doing so. The kid is just 17 years old, but is already on track to be baseball’s next superstar. Greene maxes his fastball out at a supposed 102 MPH, and hit a whopping .324 with 6 homers and 28 RBI. Greene posted a solid .75 ERA in 28 IP while striking out 43 before being shut down on the mound. The two-way sensation is committed to attend UCLA, but that won’t be a factor when he is drafted next week. This kid is a class act; he has been acknowledged for his community service efforts as well as his grades in school. Greene is a local role model for the young baseball players of his area.

Should the Twins Select Hunter Greene?

How many times have we seen it happen before as sports fans? The high-school phenom that was supposed to change the world of sports gets injured or burns out before their prime. Hunter is said to participate in yoga classes, and have a very good connection to his body, as well as his arm. The Twins are in a serious rebuilding stage, and they certainly do not want to mess this pick up. Some believe that the team should play it safe and select a player with college experience, while some think Greene is the right choice for the Twins moving forward. Personally, I think Hunter Greene has all the talent and potential that he needs to be selected number one. He also looks to have the demeanor and willingness to compete for a World Series title in the future. You hear that, Dave?