Fans See a Discombobulated Red Sox Team

I love to bake but I’m not very good at it. That’s my sister Mary’s expertise. It doesn’t mean I don’t keep trying. Mary gives me her recipes and I follow them precisely. Despite my attention to detail, my creations often come out of the oven on fire. Needless to say that’s frustrating. The Red Sox front office and management must feel the same way about the lineup they assembled this season. After all, they have all the ingredients for a

Discombobulated Red Sox

championship team but no matter how careful they are they can’t catch first place. In some cases, like my cookies, they game catches fire, and not in a good way. Their offensive is inconsistent, and so is their pitching. Unlike recent years where the Red Sox were just bad, fans are watching a discombobulated Red Sox struggle on the mound and the plate.

First and foremost I will reiterate that the Red Sox need to break up with John Farrell. He knows how to rally the troops when his job is on the line, but then they become complacent and start losing again. But replacing Farrell isn’t the only thing the Sox need to focus on.

Porcello Can’t Get It Together

Rick Porcello ran away with the Cy Young Award last year after going 22-4 last season. That’s an .846 winning percentage. So it was only natural fans and management alike expected Porcello to do the same, of not better, this year. But as of June 16th Porcello is 3-8 and leading the league in losses. Seven of his eight losses came as a result of a lack of run support. Red Sox hitters didn’t score more than four runs in any of those losses. But it doesn’t help with Porcello gives up a lot of runs either. If Porcello can find a consistently reliable pitch then we’ll start seeing more wins out of him. But for now he’s part of the reason we’re seeing a discombobulated Red Sox team on the field.

Hitters Aren’t In Their Prime Yet

It’s exciting to see Jackie Bradley Jr. blast a home run 450 feet. But don’t forget he’s only hitting .232 so far this season. Everyone loves Andrew Benintendi but he’s just a rookie and has a long ways to go before he reaches his prime. Mookie Betts and Xander Bogaerts are strong hitters but still struggle to maintain consistency throughout the season. It’s going to be another season or two before these hitters are an ever-present threat to opposing pitchers. When they enter their prime though they’ll catch fire. Hopefully David Price stays healthy, Porcello shakes his slump, and Sale becomes better than ever.

Red Sox Should Make Pedroia Player Manager

The Red Sox have a problem. John Farrell claimed to be embarrassed after the 21-2 shelling the Sox took from the Angels. At this point though it’s hard to trust him. He continues to insert Clay Buchholz into the rotation as if he’s going to suddenly pitch better. Personally, I have a better chance of scoring a date with a supermodel before Buchholz wins another game. Farrell’s bad judgment, along with poor playing in general, should be reason enough to fire him. But who should take over?  If the Red Sox made Pedroia player manager, they’d be gaining a veteran player who knows the team inside and out. MorePedrioa player manager importantly, they’ll get someone who can light a fire under the team.

The Red Sox have been more consistent in this season than in the last two, but there’s room for improvement. Firing Farrell is a good start. He doesn’t strike many as being on total control of the team, and his judgment calls are questionable at best. Pedrioa though has been with the Red Sox for his entire career. As a Rookie of the Year in 2007 and Most Valuable Player in 2008, Pedrioa has led the league in runs, hits, and doubles. He can hit with power, he can steal bases, and he can play solid defense. As Pedrioa begins to enter his mid-thirties, he’ll have to think about his life after playing. Given that he can run, throw, and hit, Pedrioa could effectively coach and manager upcoming players.

Argument for Making Pedrioa Player Manager

Making Pedrioa player manager would make the transition smoother, and the team would already know him well. More importantly, he would be able to light a fire under the team’s collective a$$es, which they really need. Whether the team is tired going into the All-Star break, or not communicating well enough, they need more guidance. Pedrioa has no tolerance for poor playing, and doesn’t let records or fame get in his way of playing his hardest.

In a June 27th game against Tampa Bay, Red Sox pitcher Eduardo Rodriguez gave up nine runs and eleven hits in only 2 2/3 innings. Before Farrell pulled him, Pedrioa could be seen giving the young southpaw some heated and intense advice on the mound. What did Pedrioa tell him? “Do you honestly think I’m going to tell you that?” Pedrioa replied when asked. “I was talking to him about baseball. I talk to all my teammates, every day. That’s about it.”

Dustin Pedrioa is smart, works harder than any other player, and can rally the team. He’s already a team leader. So with that said, what better guy could the Red Sox gain to take over than Pedrioa? Making Pedroia player manager would allow him to continue playing while taking over the entire direction of the team. It’s fire, determination, and inspiration that the Red Sox need right now. Making Pedroia player manager would not only inspire the team, it would inspire all of Boston.