The Red Sox are Finally Halfway Through the Season

The All Star game and Home Run Derby are finally done. Now the Red Sox are halfway through the season with one goal in mind. That goal – Make it to the postseason. It sounds like a long shot, but hopefully with some motivation, it can be done.

Over the past few days, the Red Sox have been involved in trade talks, especially when ithalfway through comes to pitching. One thing to note is that they are in the process of moving postseason hero, Nathan Eovaldi to the bullpen. At 49-41, the Red Sox are two games out of the Wild Card. The question now is, can they do what it takes to see October?

A lot of Questions Halfway Through the Season

Right now, the Red Sox are in third place in the American League East. The two teams in front of them, the New York Yankees and Tampa Bay Rays, have been on a ht streak for some time now. As we saw in London, the Yankees aren’t slowing down anytime soon. As for the Rays, they are 4-3 in July, and finished the half with the fourth best record in team history.

One thing that these two teams have that the Red Sox are lacking is solid pitching. For Tampa Bay, two of their pitchers are in the top ten in ERA, with Charlie Morton in the number one spot. The Yankees, who have one of the better bullpens in the Majors, have a successful closer in Aroldis Chapman. Right now, he is leading the league with twenty four saves.

The big question for the Red Sox is the bullpen. One bright spot in the bullpen for Boston is Brandon Workman. Right now, he is 8-1 with a 1.79 ERA. In 2019, Workman has pitched in 43 games, logging 40.1 innings and striking out fifty five batters. This is all well and good, however, the rest of the bullpen needs a wake up call.

At the halfway point, the bullpen has blown eighteen saves, and are behind the New York Mets who have blown twenty one. Last season, the Red Sox only had twenty blown saves. At this rate, they’re looking at not only passing last season’s blown saves, but possibly doubling the eighteen they have now.

Another question mark is the rotation. With both Chris Sale and Rick Porcello having off years, it’s tough not to think about adding another arm to the mix. Right now, one of the rumors is that the Red Sox might be trading for another starter. This will help big time, especially later in the season. We saw how that worked out last season with the trade for Nathan Eovaldi.

Is The Magic Gone?

No, really, is it? Think about it. Last season, the Red Sox were 68-30 at the halfway point. This season, they’re 49-41. In the offseason, the only major impacts were that Joe Kelly and Craig Kimbrel left. Other than that, the team is practically the same. Granted, no team has won back to back championships since the Yankees did it in 1999 and 2000. Actually, they won three times in a row, but that’s another story.

Mookie Betts and the rest of the line up are slowly waking up, and getting the ball in play. The call up of Michael Chavis and the emergence of Rafael Devers in his second full season has definitely helped the Red Sox. As for the pitching part, time can only tell what will happen next. In a few short weeks, the trade deadline will be here. Will the Red Sox be buyers, or sellers? Will Dave Dombrowski do what needs to be done to get this team back to the postseason? Red Sox Nation only hopes that he will.

A Home Run Derby in Baltimore

After winning the last two games at home, the Red Sox went to Baltimore looking to add onto the win streak. That’s just what they did. The line up in the first game went to work early, and dished out a 13-2 victory. Brock Holt’s two run home run sparked a mini home run derby for Boston. In total, the Red Sox hit six home runs.

Between strong pitching, and heavy hitting, Boston swept Baltimore at Camden Yards.home run derby The line up added onto the home run total, hitting a total of nine home runs. JD Martinez hit three home runs, and overtook the team lead with 16 altogether. With the sweep, the Red Sox have now won five games in a row! They now move onto Target Field and the Twins.

Game One’s Home Run Derby Leads Boston to Victory

After splitting the series against Texas at Fenway, the Red Sox looked to do some damage in Baltimore. After being down 1-0, Brock Holt responded with a two run home run in the second inning. This sparked a great rally by Boston bats. A total of six home runs, and a strong start by Eduardo Rodriguez led Boston to a wild win.

Christian Vazquez hit a solo home run in the fourth inning, while Martinez hit a two run home run shortly after. Jackie Bradley Jr. joined in on the fun in the fifth, with a two run home run. The AL Rookie of the Year hopeful Michael Chavis also hit a two run shot in the same inning. JD Martinez, being JD, hit another home run as well.

Eduardo Rodriguez, looking for his seventh win, went seven innings, allowing six hits and one earned run. He also struck out four. The bullpen did their part as well, with solid innings by Travis Lakins and Josh Smith.

A Pitcher’s Duel in Game Two

Chris Sale got the start for Boston as they were looking to continue their hot streak. After a silent five innings, Boston punched a hole in the runs column, scoring three in the sixth inning. Xander Bogaerts run scoring double put the Sox up 1-0. From there, Brock Holt scored Bogaerts with a single, and a costly error by Baltimore scored Holt. JD Martinez also contributed with his team leading 16th home run in the seventh inning to solidify the home run derby.

With Sale dominating on the mound, Boston’s lead was pretty safe. Sale pitched six innings, allowing two runs while striking out ten. Four more runs by Boston will allow them to win 7-2, and Sale to pick up win number three. Marcus Walden, Matt Barnes and Brandon Workman did great out of the bullpen. The three men pitched the remainder of the game, allowing two hits, and striking out five to seal the deal.

The Sunday Finale vs The Orioles

This win was a little tougher to get, as Boston edged out Baltimore 8-6. The game did go into the tenth, but late inning home runs by Marco Hernandez and Rafael Devers led Boston to victory.

Brian Johnson got the start for the Red Sox on Sunday. He pitched three innings, allowing one run and striking out two. This was his first start off the injured list, so Cora and company didn’t want to push him too much. The bullpen took over from there, with Brandon Workman getting the win, his fifth of the season.

Probably the most impressive part of the game was the five run tenth inning. After Hernandez tied it in the ninth with his first home run of the season, Boston scored five in the tenth. This was led by Devers’ mammoth home run-a 458 foot shot-to lead it off.

Boston Looks to Continue the Streak in Minnesota

Rick Porcello has the ball in game one against the Minnesota Twins at Target Field. The Twins, who are 47-23, took two out of three against the Kansas City Royals at home. Also this past weekend the Twins retired long time catcher Joe Mauer’s number 7. Mauer, who retired after last season, was a home grown Twin. He spent fifteen seasons in the Twin City, winning the AL MVP Award in 2009. Near the end of his career, Mauer played first base and DH’ed.

MLB Must Fix the All-Star Game Voting

I love the All-Star Game. It’s a timeless and magic event that showcases the very best of baseball. I always remember the excitement of watching the Midsummer Classic as a kid, and being amazed that all my favorite players assembled each July for a contest ripped straight from hardball fantasy. Yet this year, the prospect of watching eight Kansas City Royals start in Cincinnati, as the voting presently dictates, simply doesn’t appeal. In fact, it threatens to make a mockery of the entire process, and consign the All-Star Game to sad irrelevance.

My opposition to the Royals’ domination of voting is multifaceted. Firstly, we must All-Star Gameremember that the All-Star Game determines which league has home-field advantage for the World Series. This came into play last year, when the Giants and Royals met in Game 7 at Kauffman Stadium. Therefore, if the game counts, the best player at each position must be selected. For instance, Omar Infante, possessing the lowest OPS of any qualified hitter in Major League Baseball, should not start the game while Jose Altuve, Jason Kipnis, or even Dustin Pedroia sits on the bench. That nightmare scenario is on the verge of becoming reality. Similarly, Eric Hosmer is currently slated to start ahead of Miguel Cabrera, and, judging by the last vote count, Mike Moustakas is on pace to play third, ahead of Josh Donaldson and his 17 home runs.

Such fundamentally flawed selections not only affect the American League’s chances of victory, but, in a wider sense, they also insult the history and tradition of the All-Star Game, which has always been a sacred opportunity for the greatest stars to assemble on one stage. Some Royals, such as Alex Gordon and Salvador Perez, are undoubtedly worthy of All-Star honors, but others, such as Infante and Alcides Escobar, simply aren’t worthy of the accolade. By voting for such clearly undeserving players, the currency of All-Star Game selection is devalued immensely, and the contest itself becomes cheap and meaningless.

This fiasco comes at a time when MLB is trying to appeal to a younger audience. Baseball, usually slow and ponderous, isn’t hugely compatible with our modern world, typically frantic and hyperactive. These days, kids generally prefer the fast-paced drama of basketball, or the instantaneous excitement of football, over the meandering poetry of baseball. Yet, the All-Star Game, by design, is a prime opportunity for MLB to showcase a different face; a prime opportunity to exhibit the young stars of our game in a more relaxed and vibrant setting. For instance, the Home Run Derby is a great way of engaging young kids. Accordingly, baseball’s brightest stars, such as Cabrera, Mike Trout, Bryce Harper and Giancarlo Stanton, should play a starring role. They certainly shouldn’t sit on the sidelines watching Kendrys Morales or Lorenzo Cain.

Ultimately, MLB must fix this broken system. Right now, the All-Star Game is a brilliant reminder of baseball’s past, full of tradition and prestige, but also a potentially great vehicle for future progress, full of intrigue and entertainment. Yet, in allowing so many unsuitable players to be part of the festivities, baseball will destroy a once-beloved event, and miss another huge opportunity to develop a global fanbase. Rob Manfred must intervene, to save the players from embarrassment, the All-Star Game from shame, and baseball from slipping further into the shadows of general indifference.