Did Dave Dombrowski Make The Right Move?

The trade deadline came and went yesterday. As the clock struck 4pm on July 31st, Red Sox Nation learned that Boston didn’t participate in the trade deadline. While teams like Tampa Bay and Houston were dealing, Boston was silent. The question is, did Dave Dombrowski make the right move?

While the Red Sox were tied to many trade rumors, none of them panned out. As thedombrowski make clock ran down, it was obvious that many top performers were heading to other teams. For example, pitchers like Shane Greene and Mike Leake were traded to contending teams. Some of the players that Boston had on their radar stayed with their current teams. The Mets and Blue Jays held onto closers, Edwin Diaz and Ken Giles yesterday.

Did Dave Dombrowski Make The Right Move at the Deadline?

At 4:01pm, when it was evident that the Red Sox weren’t participating in the trade deadline, President Dave Dombroski held a press conference. “We had an opportunity to make a lot of trades, if we wanted to,” Dombrowski stated to reporters on Wednesday prior to the Red Sox game against the Rays. However, the question of did Dave Dombrowski make the right move by not trading anyone is still something that needs to be answered.

The players that Dombrowski offered weren’t enough, and teams wanted more for their better players. Some of these names included Andrew Benintendi and Michael Chavis. Yet, Boston stayed put.

Did Dave Dombrowski make the right move by not making one at all? It was pretty evident on Wednesday night, when Boston lost their third straight game, moving further down the standings. While Dombrowski made some good points at the press conference, many are still questioning his motives.

The Trade Deadline Around The League

While Dave Dombrowski was silent at the deadline, other teams were wheeling and dealing. The most notable trade was the one made by the Diamondbacks, as they traded All Star Zack Greinke to the Houston Astros. The Astros made a big splash yesterday, not only acquiring Greinke, but also getting Aaron Sanchez from Toronto, and Martin Maldonado from the Cubs.

A few former Red Sox pitchers were traded as well. Drew Pomeranz was traded from the Giants to the Brewers, while Roenis Elias went from the Mariners to the Nationals. Pomeranz was set to possibly pitch against the Red Sox in September. Now, it looks like the reunion will have to wait.

For the past few days, many teams were out trading to stack their rosters. Another notable trade was the three team deal that sent Trevor Bauer to Cincinnati and Yasiel Puig to Cleveland. San Diego was in on the trade as well, acquiring outfield prospect Taylor Trammel.

What Does This Mean For Boston?

After a surge that saw the Red Sox go 3-1 against the Yankees, nothing has gone right for Boston. Right now, they are 0-2 against the Rays, and are 2.5 games out of the wild card. At 10-5, Andrew Cashner looks to win his second straight Red Sox start tonight against Tampa Bay.

There are different ways to look into yesterday’s trade deadline. Only time can tell with this strategy. While there is only one deadline this season, it can turn in Boston’s favor down the road. Other teams, such as the Yankees and Cardinals didn’t make moves either. While the Yankees are in first place in the AL East, the Cardinals are tied for first with the Cubs.

Did Dombrowski and Company make the right move? We’ll see as the rest of the season continues on. While many would have loved to have seen a new arm in the bullpen or rotation, one can only wonder what the off season will look like.

The Red Sox Look To Continue Their Success at Fenway Park

After an eventful road trip that saw the Red Sox go 5-2, the Red Sox look to continue their success at Fenway Park as they welcome Seattle, Colorado and Houston. The Red Sox, who enter the homestead at an even .500, are looking to keep climbing the ladder. The Red Sox look to also dethrone the Tampa Bay Rays.

However, they need to get past three teams. One is seeking revenge following thered sox look American League Championship Series. This homestead is shaping up to be quite interesting, as the Red Sox keep rolling in May.

The Seattle Mariners Come To Boston

The Mariners look to continue their success against the Red Sox. Last time the Red Sox played Seattle they won the series 3-1. Since then, Seattle is 20-20, putting them in second place in the AL West. Prior to making the trip to Boston, they played the Yankees in New York. Seattle went 1-3 in that series.

A familiar face returns to Fenway Park in Roenis Elias. He pitched for Boston in 2016 and 2017. This season, Elias is 2-0, with a 2.41 ERA. He has pitched in 16 games and has 4 saves in as many opportunities.

Another player to keep an eye on is none other than Edwin Encarnacion. He is batting .244 in 127 plate appearances with 12 home runs and 26 RBI’s. Currently, Encarnacion is eight home runs away from reaching the 400 home run mark. He is also seven away from tying Hall of Famer Al Kaline. In his 15 seasons, Encarnacion has played on four teams. He is also a three time All Star, and was a part of the 2013 World Baseball Classic.

The Rockies Look To Keep Rolling At Fenway

Yes, the Rockies are coming to Fenway for the first time since 2016. When they last were at Fenway, the Red Sox won the series 2-1. Of course, many Red Sox fans remember when we played the Rockies in 2007. I believe we won a World Series that time?

Anyways, before the Rockies head to Boston, they will play the San Diego Padres at Coors Field in Denver. The Rockies, who are 17-20, look to climb out of the hole that they are in. Of course, they are a young and talented team that has proven themselves over the past few years.

During the off season, third baseman Nolan Arenado made headlines when he signed an eight year contract extension to stay in Denver. The four-time All-Star is continuing to make a name for himself. He is currently batting .322 with 10 home runs and 30 RBI’s. Since making his MLB debut, he has also won six Gold Gloves, and four Silver Slugger Awards.

Houston, We Have A Problem…

After losing in the AL Championship Series, the Houston Astros have some unfinished business. The last time the Red Sox saw the Astros, it was Game five of the ALCS. The Red Sox won that game, which led them to the World Series. Since then, the Astros have been doing pretty well. They are currently 23-15, and sit in first place in the AL West. They will be playing a series in Detroit before heading to Fenway.

One familiar name on the Houston Astros roster is Wade Miley. Red Sox fans remember Miley from his stint in a Red Sox uniform back in 2015. As a member of the Red Sox, Miley went 11-11 in 32 starts with a 4.46 ERA. So far this season, he is 3-2 with a 3.18 ERA in eight games.

Connecticut Red Sox fans look back at George Springer with warmth. The New Britain native and former UCONN Husky is coming back to Fenway Park to face his former teammate, Matt Barnes and the Boston Red Sox. Springer, who is in his sixth season, is batting .301 with 13 home runs and 33 RBI’s. He also has four stolen bases on the season. The 2017 World Series MVP is looking to continue his success in an Astros uniform.

Can The Red Sox Continue Their Success At Fenway Park?

May has been a great month for the Red Sox. After a slow April, they have gone 6-2 in May. The bats have woken up from their deep sleep. Plus, Chris Sale and the rest of the rotation look like they’re on a mission. Granted, there are injuries to key players such as Nathan Eovaldi and David Price. However, guys like Michael Chavis and Marcus Walden are proving their worth.

Let’s hope this May is the start of a giant leap. One that will hopefully lead to another championship run. Keep the faith Red Sox Nation. The boys are back!!

Believing in Brian Johnson

The old expression is “You gotta believe.” For pitcher Brian Johnson, believing he can assist the Red Sox in the bullpen is something for which he is responsible. Throughout his career, Johnson has gone through a roller coaster ride – from spot starts, to coming out of the bullpen for Boston. Looking for a greater role in 2019 will be interesting for Johnson.

On May 27th, 2017, Red Sox pitcher Brian Johnson did something that hasn’t been done in a Red Sox uniform since Pedro Martinez. Johnson pitched a complete game shut out against the Seattle Mariners. Where was I? Well, I was sitting in the bleachers, a few rows back from the bullpen, watching as Johnson threw strike after strike. The game lasted a little over two hours, which was remarkable.

For the guy who is like the underdog in the Red Sox organization, Johnson has been a constant presence in the Red Sox organization. For manager Alex Cora, relying on the veteran last season was key to the success this team had going into the postseason. Johnson had career highs in game appearances, as well as innings pitched.

From Starter to Reliever Back to Starter

Throughout his career in a Red Sox uniform, Johnson has been a spot starter for the Red Sox. In his 48 MLB appearances, only 19 of them have been starts. Johnson is 7-6 in his career, with a lifetime ERA of 4.69.

Following an injury to Clay Buchholz in 2015, Johnson was called up from Pawtucket, and made his MLB debut on July 21st of that season. He pitched in 4.1 innings in a loss to the Houston Astros. That game was the only one he would play in during the 2015 season, as he was sent back to Pawtucket.

The next time Johnson saw Major League action was in 2017. In that game, he pitched that remarkable shut out against the Seattle Mariners. Following that, he made four more starts for the Red Sox, going 2-0 with a 4.33 ERA.

In 2018, Cora used Brian Johnson quite a bit. He pitched in 38 games, while making 13 starts. Johnson went 4-5 with a 4.17 ERA last season, however, he was not added to the postseason roster.

Johnson, who is currently on the injured list, is part of the 2019 team. So far, he has pitched 4 games out of the bullpen, with all those games being on the road. On Opening Day at Fenway, Johnson was presented with his first championship ring. It was well earned too, due to the work he did during the 2018 season.

Can We Call Brian Johnson The Underdog?

For a guy whose career has been up and down, Johnson has been a consistent presence in the Red Sox organization. I think that he will continue to surprise us all when he runs out of the bullpen. Johnson has the ability to dominate in games. It’s just a matter of trust in his pitches.

Many might disagree when I say that Johnson is the secret weapon in the bullpen. However, when you look at what he has been able to accomplish and overcome in his life, he is truly one of the good guys.

Are Red Sox Regretting Losing Ramirez?

The decision to designate Hanley Ramirez for assignment brought on the skeptics. The argument widely made was by getting rid of Hanley, the Red Sox would save money this year and next, but lose a veteran power presence in the middle of the lineup. Manager Alex Cora discussed the option with David Dombrowski and in order to make room for second baseman Dustin Pedroia, Hanley was ultimately DFA’d. That financial decision may hurt the Sox as they head towards the summer and beyond.

During Cora’s playing days, he was widely known as a great “clubhouse guy” who is willingRamirez to play anywhere that benefits the team. He was a super utility guy, much like Brock Holt. It seems Cora has maintained that same mindset of clubhouse friendly but versatile type players even as a skipper. By letting Ramirez go, it meant versatile guys like Blake Swihart, Eduardo Nunez, and Holt types would get more playing time. That may be great in theory, but now Pedroia, who was the reason for the Hanley roster move, is back on the D.L., Mookie remains sidelined and guys like Sam Travis are playing left field.

In the final game against the Detroit Tigers this week, Cora changed up his lineup. He had Swihart start at catcher, Nunez at second, Vasquez at DH, Travis starting in left field and J.D. Martinez playing the intricate Fenway Park right field. I can’t help but think Hanley could have helped the Red Sox in some sort of way in that game. A game that ended in a loss.

Red Sox May Regret Losing the Depth That Ramirez Created

Depth is huge right now in the game of baseball. Now with starters going less and less deep into games, routinely seen exiting after five or six innings, depth is all more important. Relievers now come in that specialize in getting certain types of hitters out. By having more utility guys on the bench, rather than in the starting nine, managers can counter that specialized approach. Losing Hanley hinders that depth.

With Hanley gone, Moreland, who historically is great as a pinch hitter, is now starting at first every day. Swihart becomes much more needed as a backup outfield plan. Players such as Holt and Nunez have to start more due to other player’s injuries. Playing time is always a preference, but that isn’t normally these players niche. Sometimes those type of players gain value on the bench. Value they gain with the ability to be played in different defensive and offensive situations.

World Champion Houston Astros, exemplified this approach last season with utility depth like Marwin Gonzalez seen playing any position, any game. Charlie Morton also provided depth. He became the new wave “utility-type” bullpen arm if the starter struggles, much like Cleveland Indians Andrew Miller.

It will be interesting to see how this progresses. Maybe I am overthinking it now, but you can’t help but think Ramirez will be missed at some point.

 

Andrew Benintendi Picked A Great Time to Heat Up

As the Boston Red Sox blazed out of the gate to a 17-2 start this season, the bat of Andrew Benintendi was nowhere to be found. But it didn’t matter. The rest of the offense picked up the slack, and then some. Through the month of April, he batted .274 with 23 hits, 15 runs batted in, a .376 on-base percentage, a .440 slugging percentage, and only managed to hit one home run.

His struggles at the plate were largely overshadowed by the rest of the offense. Namely Andrew BenintendiJ.D. Martinez and Mookie Betts, who had much less trouble hitting dingers. The duo captivated Boston. Betts emerged as a surefire MVP candidate and Martinez warmed the hearts of Red Sox Nation as a home run of a free agent signing. Pun intended.

But those struggles were never ignored completely. Between the lines of the Red Sox’ historic start was curiosity as to where the production from Boston’s handsome left fielder had gone. Then the calendar turned to May, and the beautiful swing of Andrew Benintendi started making things happen. And the timing could not have been better.

Andrew Benintendi Back In Form

Hanley Ramirez was designated for assignment on May 25th. Mookie Betts was shut down with a left abdominal strain that same week. Later placed on the 10-day disabled list, Betts is still out of the lineup. And all of a sudden the Red Sox lineup was missing some serious offensive firepower. Benintendi’s missing bat finally started to show up, resulting in a drastically more productive month of May. Improving upon his batting average (.349), on-base percentage (.411), slugging percentage (.633), hit total (38), RBI total (23), and HR total (6), he finally returned to the form we know and love.

And it gets better. Benintendi’s month of June is off to an even better start. Against the reigning champion Houston Astros on June 2nd, Benintendi launched a ball into the Milky Way to put the Sox ahead for good and secure the team’s 40th victory. He then put another one into orbit the following night en route to a 9-3 win. His power surged helped the Sox salvage a series split against one of the best teams in the nation. Thanks in large part to him, the Boston Red Sox were the first team in the league to win 40 games.

At 41-19, the Boston Red Sox have the best record in Major League Baseball. And while Benintendi may not have contributed early on, he is more than making up for it now.

Are We Seeing a New Era of Entitled Baseball Players?

The Houston Astros played the Chicago White Sox last Friday night in Chicago. The Astros’ Justin Verlander, arguably a future Hall of Famer, took a no-hitter into the fifth inning. The White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson had other plans though. Anderson broke up the no-no in the bottom of the fifth with a single, but that’s not what angered Verlander. With a 3-0 count on the next batter, Anderson attempted to steal second base, but the next batter walked so the steal didn’t count. It was Anderson’s apparent celebration of the walk that upset Verlander. Was Anderson wrong to showboat on the field? Or is Verlander a part of a new era of entitled baseball players?

“I wasn’t upset with him being excited about getting a hit,” Verlander was quoted asentitled baseball players saying in a Yahoo! Sports article. “But he celebrated [trying to steal on a 3-0 in a 5-0 game], though.” When told about Verlander’s annoyance at him, Anderson replied, “I’m out just playing and having fun. If he took it to heart, so what?”

There’s no doubt that players get frustrated, especially pitchers. But does Verlander have a point about the unwritten rules of baseball that apparently say it’s not cool to try and steal on a 3-0 count? Or is Verlander just being a crybaby? After all, Verlander got the win and the White Sox never scored on him. So what’s he complaining about?

Baseball players have always been cocky. Reggie Jackson once said, “After Jackie Robinson, the most important black in baseball history is Reggie Jackson, I really mean that.” Rickey Henderson used to talk about himself in the third person, calling himself the greatest of all time. Bob Gibson refused to talk to members of the opposing team. So what’s the difference between Verlander and these Hall of Famers? First of all, these HoFers were very competitive. That’s not to say that Verlander isn’t. But fans didn’t usually hear the kind of petty complaining from these guys. That’s not to say they never complained. But the difference is that Verlander is throwing a fit over a game that he and the Astros won 10-0. How much is enough for him? And if the White Sox were down that much, why WOULDN’T they try to steal bases to try and get ahead? Who is Verlander to say what they can and can’t do?

Entitled Baseball Players Ruin the Fun

On April 1st, the Orioles’ catcher Chance Sisco dropped a bunt against the Minnesota Twins’ pitcher Jose Berrios and reached first safely. While Berrios won the game 7-0, the Twins were mad at Sisco for bunting. According to Mike Berardino of the St. Paul Pioneer Press, Twins second baseman Brian Dozier wasn’t happy about the bunt. “Obviously, we’re not a fan of it. He’s a young kid. I could’ve said something at second base but they have tremendous veteran leadership over there. I’m sure they’ll address that. It’s all about learning. You learn up here.”

Again, what’s the problem here? The Astros and Twins won both games by hefty margins, but they didn’t like the opposing team’s attempts to exploit their weakness. It’s like hearing a mugger complain to the police because someone squirted pepper spray in his eyes as he tried to steal a purse. What did you think the other party was going to do? Just roll over and give up because you’re overpowering them?

Verlander and Berrios need to remember what the great Orioles manager Earl Weaver once said, “You can’t sit on a lead and run a few plays into the line and just kill the clock. You’ve got to throw the ball over the damn plate and give the other man his chance. That’s why baseball is the greatest game of them all.” The White Sox and Orioles, respectively, got another chance and did what they could to overcome the deficit. That’s the whole point of the game of baseball, if not most other sports. Verlander and Berrios should focus less on being entitled baseball players and focus more on being a good sport.

Players refusing to question these “unwritten rules” not only puts their team at risk of losing but emboldens the arrogance seen in these entitled baseball players.