Dustin Pedroia Could Win the Batting Title

Dustin Pedroia is still the beating heart of this Red Sox team. Sure, Mookie Betts is now the defining star, and David Ortiz will always be the ultimate hero. But nobody embodies the spirit and fight of Boston baseball quite like the scrappy second baseman. And with just under three weeks remaining, Pedey has a legitimate shot at becoming the American League batting champion, a fitting tribute to his remarkable resurgence.

Dustin Pedroia

Nowadays, batting average is sneered at. Led by statisticians, many people consider it an inferior metric for gauging performance. It’s too one-dimensional, they say. It only takes into account one skill, rather than four or five. In this age of Statcast, where every aspect of baseball is calculated and scrutinized, I understand the concern. Yet batting average remains one of the most instantly recognizable measurements of talent, if not the most accurate.

We’re all supposed to worship at the altar of Wins Above Replacement, but few casual fans even know how it’s calculated. WAR offers no concise moment of greatness, such as when a hitter slugs his 500th career home run or notches his 3,000th hit. So, to me, batting average and other traditional numbers still have a pretty special place in the game, even if their utility has been surpassed by newer, sexier metrics.

The Resurgence of Dustin Pedroia

Therefore, what Dustin Pedroia is doing fascinates me. At 33, the ultimate grinder is having one of his best ever seasons. Pedroia has a .332/.391/.465 slash line with 13 home runs, 34 doubles and 66 RBI. Judging by OPS, a catch-all stat for offensive performance, this is his best campaign since 2011. In terms of WAR, it’s already his best since 2013, with eighteen games remaining. When all is said and done, Dustin Pedroia may not receive MVP consideration, but his importance to the Red Sox cannot be overstated.

Numbers simply don’t do the guy justice. However, one number, that .332 batting average, is particularly intriguing. Right now, only Jose Altuve, the Houston Astros’ hitting machine, has a higher average in the American League. Altuve presently sits at .340, making for a tight race and interesting subplot in the final weeks of an enthralling season.

In Pursuit of History

Bill Mueller was the last Red Sox player to win a batting title. The third baseman did so with a .326 mark in 2003. It may be difficult for Dustin Pedroia to haul back an eight-point disadvantage this late in the season and follow in Mueller’s footsteps, but stranger things have happened. All it takes is for one hot streak to coincide with a rare skid for Altuve, and one of the greatest players in Red Sox history would add another historic achievement to his resume.

While the batting title may have lost some of its prestige, there’s still a certain charm to its history. It’s one of the oldest awards in the game, one that Ty Cobb lusted after so violently in a different age. For that reason, that sense of tradition, we should root for Dustin Pedroia to win the batting crown. I can hardly think of a more deserving recipient.

Red Sox Lose Seventh Straight Game

The Red Sox continued their losing ways last night, dropping their seventh consecutive game with a 4-2 loss to the Houston Astros. It marked their eighth loss in the last ten games, and further cemented their position in the cellar of the American League.

Since the All-Star break, the Sox have been outscored 34-9, and they have a batting Red Sox Astros July 2015average of an anemic .192. They have one home run in this period, while giving up thirteen. The Sox were shut out in the first two games of this trip, and haven’t even scored in consecutive innings yet. Their four total runs in the series against the Angels were their fewest in a series of four or more games since 1965.  Yes, that’s 50 years.

Mookie Betts and Dustin Pedroia, who are supposed to be table-setters, can’t even get a seat at the table.  They are a combined 2 for 42.  Betts is 1 for 20, and didn’t even play last night, while Pedroia finally snapped an 0 for 20 drought in the most recent loss.

Also in the throes of repair at the plate is the $19,750,000 per year outfielder Hanley Ramirez. He is 2 for 21 in the last six, with a team-high seven strikeouts.

How about the starting pitching staff?  They haven’t reminded anybody of Cy Young. Since the break, they are 0-5 with an ERA of 7.31. One upside from the pitchers is that Wade Miley had a solid outing last time out, not giving up a hit through six innings. He’ll try to snap this season-high team losing streak tonight.

Miley actually had a perfect game going through 5 1/3 innings against the Angels and ended up allowing just two hits and one walk in seven innings…but still took a no decision.

Where things go from here is anybody’s guess.  We haven’t mentioned Clay Buchholz getting a platelet-rich-plasma injection into his right elbow. Who knows when he’ll be back, but don’t look for him for at least a few weeks, and if by late August the Sox are 20 games out, or 25, is it even worth it to bring him back?

Red Sox Rotation for Angels Series

The Red Sox, after a four day layoff, head to the west coast to faces the Angels this weekend for a four game series that carries over to Monday. As the Red Sox prepare for this series, John Farrell set his rotation for the first three games out in the City of Angels.

Wade Miley, who closed out the first half, will open the second half—pitching on regular rest. Rick Porcello will get the start Saturday night while Eduardo Rodriguez will take the mound on Sunday. Red Sox RotationNo starter has been announced for Monday as of yet, but likely Brian Johnson will be making his major league debut or Justin Masterson will take the ball again.

The time is now for the Red Sox to make a statement. After a series with the Angels the Sox will travel to Houston for three games before returning home. The Sox took 2 of 3 from Houston just last weekend. The Sox sit at 42-47; not exactly where they should be after the off-season they had. Being 5 games under .500 does have them in last place, but they are only 6.5 games behind the first place Yankees.

The trade deadline is only two weeks away and label of buyer or seller is something the Red Sox have embraced. Clay Buchholz’ injury hurts the Red Sox in the present and the future—he could help them keep winning or help them get some good pieces back at the trade deadline. The extent of his injury is unknown as is how long he will be out for, but the Red Sox rotation likely will not stack up without Buchholz entering it again sometime soon.

Rick Porcello needs to continue to keep the ball down. Ryan Hanigan will likely catch Porcello for the rest of the season as they try to replicate his most recent start where he gave up two runs and lowered his ERA to a still high 5.90. The time is now for Porcello to make a statement that he can be the pitcher the Red Sox acquired to help anchor the top of the rotation.

Red Sox Continue to Tease Us

The Red Sox took 2 of 3 from the current best team in the AL after Hanley Ramirez hit a game-winning 2-run home run Sunday to lift the Sox over the Houston Astros. That home run gave the Red Sox their 11th win in 17 games, as they continue to tease us. The worst part—this team looks like a completely different team than the one that we have been watching for the past 3 months.

Minus a few exceptions, notably Rick Porcello (who got slammed in his last start against Red SoxToronto), everyone has been performing better in the past couple of weeks. Hanley Ramirez has hit 5 home runs in his last 10 games, and catcher Ryan Hanigan recorded his first 3 hit game in over a year against the Astros. Let’s not forget to mention the stability Hanigan brings behind the plate (the Sox are 12-8 in games that he starts this season).

And then there’s Koji Uehara who is riding a 7 inning scoreless streak and holding opposing hitters to 1-23 during that span. Like I said, the Red Sox are getting more consistent performances from more of the players.

The Red Sox are making me be optimistic again, and while I really want to believe they can get hot, I’ve heard this story before. Specifically, last year. The Red Sox went 9-1 right before the All Star Break last year, and fell apart after the Red Sox front office dealt away 4 of their 5 starters at the trade deadline. Everything went to pieces after that. Now, I don’t know what their plans for this trade deadline are, but I’m a little worried about that happening again.

I hope my worst fears don’t come true and the front office doesn’t decide to be sellers again. It seems, at least right now, like they’re poised to make a run if they are buyers at the deadline. I think they’re a good #1 starter and some bullpen help away from making a late season push in a weak AL East division if they hold on to their core guys, and add the parts I just suggested. I hope they can pull it off, but I could be wrong. I hope I’m not though. I’ve said before that I hate losing.

Vocal Texas Fans Likely Members of Red Sox Nation Governors

Red Sox Nation Governors

Courtesy of frankgalasso.com

Watching the Houston series was pretty wild. There were wins and losses. The comebacks were monumental, and the initial loss devastating, but all the while, sitting in the Astros’ stands were the Fenway faithful.  Yes, in Houston the crowd could be heard yelling. “Let’s go Red Sox! Let’s go Red Sox!”

New Englanders know that fans of this team are all over the country. We see this when we travel to other cities and spy Red Sox hats and t-shirts.  We see them in the stands when we sit home at night watching the games. Never, though, have I heard the cheers for the Red Sox quite like those expressed in Texas. This begs the question: why the concentration of such devoted fans in Texas a place best known for ten-gallon hats and barbeque, not scully caps and chowdah?!? It was then that I took to the Internet in search for an answer to my question.

I quickly found a meetup group filled with 286 active members located in Houston, TX. They get together to watch, or attend, games. This must have been the group making all that noise during the games. Could they have gone to all of the games in Houston? I suppose so. Anything seems possible after winning 70 games, 1 more game than we won during the entire 2012 season.

Finally, I found that there are 41 Red Sox Nation groups in 33 states with just over 9000 members nationwide.  There is a whole organization called the Governors of Red Sox Nation that live all over the United States (and Canada). Most of the states do not have baseball teams, and are not members of the American League. For those states that the Red Sox do travel to, it is up to these groups to start whooping it up like their fellow fans in Houston.

The bar has been set, Red Sox Nation, let’s get to those games and make your voices heard!