Jackie Bradley Jr.’s 457 Foot Home Run

Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a home run last Friday against Detroit that I thought would break Ted Williams’ distance record. Bradley Jr.’s homer off Alex Wilson in the 8th put the Sox ahead for good. But few seem to notice that the ball traveled over 457 feet. That’s 45 feet short of Ted Williams’ 502 foot record. A 457 foot home run is nothing to ignore. It’s Bradley Jr.’s longest homer of the season. While the distance of the homer doesn’t really matter in the grand scheme of things, it reflects the sheer strength and speed of Bradley Jr.’s swing.

The ball may have traveled even farther than that. Last April in Baltimore, Bradley Jr. hit a457 foot home run homer off of the Orioles’ Jayson Aquino that, according to ESPN Home Run Tracker, measured 407 feet (against the wind). After the game I walked around the area in Camden Yards where the ball landed and another fan pointed to where it landed. Not two feet away was a mini-plaque marking the place where another home run landed in 2008. On July 1, 2008 the Royals’ Alex Gordon’s home run landed approximately in the same spot and measured at 425 feet. Most home runs barely make it over the wall, which is about 370 feet or so (give or take 20 feet). Each park is different. But Bradley Jr.’s home runs could clear the wall in any park.

Bradley Jr.’s 457 Foot Home Run Should Get More Recognition

Ted Williams hit that 502 foot homer in 1946 but that was before so many tall buildings went up around Fenway Park. These buildings cut down on the wind that often carries a ball out of the park. Some say that officials exaggerated Williams’ home run record. David Ortiz used to joke about the red seat marking the spot where it landed. “They moved it back a little more,” he’d allegedly say about the seat at the start of each new season. But it’s still an official record on the books.

Bradley Jr. hasn’t hit the longest home run of the season (yet). That honor goes to the Yankess’ Aaron Judge after he hit a 496 blast on June 11th at Yankee Stadium. But the thing is that Bradley Jr. is consistently hitting long homers. Bradley Jr.’s home run on June 9th marked the fifth time since April 22nd that one of his long balls traveled over 400 feet.

It won’t surprise me if Bradley Jr. comes within a few feet of Williams before the season is over. So while we should celebrate his homers, we should also pay attention where they’re landing.

Scouting Report: Danny Mars

In June 2014, a 20-year old junior college outfielder named Danny Mars was drafted by the Boston Red Sox.

Mars was nothing short of spectacular while playing at Chipola College. During his 2014 season, he hit .380 with 35 RBI in 48 games. Upon being drafted in the 6th round, Danny Mars played the rest of the year in Lowell. He batted .311 while with Lowell.

danny mars

By 2015, Mars became a mainstay in Greenville, where he hit .283 in 41 games. Last season, he hit .293 with High-A Salem with 54 RBI in 108 games. In the fall, he joined the Surprise Saguaros of the Arizona Fall League in order to get more at-bats.

It paid off, as Mars was promoted to Double-A Portland for 2017, where he normally bats in the lead-off position. As of May 23, Mars was slashing .314/.364/.449 with an OPS of .813 in 31 games.

If he continues to produce, Mars could see Pawtucket by year’s end. But because the system is crowded with talented outfielders, this remains to be seen.

Danny Mars in the Future

Overall, Mars has an athletic, average sized frame with room for added strength. His speed is one of his best tools and he has the ability to be a threat on the bases. His injury in early 2015 stunted some of his development, but he has since eased into a career .287 hitter.

According to SoxProspects.com, Mars has the potential to be a solid outfielder.

Saying: “Versatile and athletic enough to play all three outfield spots, but other tools profile best in center field. Takes good routes and gets good reads on balls.”

It’s hard to know for sure how he will develop and when he could end up in the big leagues. Especially considering the minor depth chart has the likes of Rusney Castillo and Aneury Tavarez on it. Let alone the Killer B’s up in Boston.

But one thing is for certain, Danny Mars can play. And if the Portland Sea Dogs love having him hot lead off, I don’t blame them.

Top Ten Current Red Sox Players: Part 1

After winning the AL East in 2017, Boston looks to continue their success this season. This series will look at the top ten Red Sox players on the roster in all positions. The rankings are based mainly on performances from 2016 and early 2017.

Top Ten Current Red Sox Players

  1. Jackie Bradley Jr.

Known mostly for his superb defense, Bradley has the ability to kill rallies by gunning out bradley red sox playersrunners trying to advance. Likewise, he can take hits away by making incredible catches. Additionally, the center fielder can knock in runs hitting in the middle of the lineup—87 in 2016 to be exact.

  1. Hanley Ramirez

After a rough transition back to the Red Sox and the American League, Han-Ram became a force in the lineup during the 2016 season. He batted .236 with 30 homers and 11 RBI. Now that David Ortiz is gone, Hanley must continue to drive in runs and fill his shoes at DH if the lineup is to be as successful.

  1. David Price

Even though he is currently on the disabled list, Price deserves the respect because of his consistent major league success. In 2016, he led the American League in innings pitched and was fourth in wins. This was during a so called “down year.” Maybe when he returns from injury, he’ll be back to the dominant form. And if not for playoff struggles, he’d be higher on this list.

  1. Rick Porcello

When you win the American League Cy Young Award and lead the league in wins the previous year, you deserve to find yourself near the top of any list. However so far in 2017, Porcello hasn’t had as much success, going 1-2 with a 5.32 ERA in four starts. Granted it is a small sample size, though.

  1. Dustin Pedroia

            Following Ortiz’s retirement, Pedroia is now the undisputed leader and captain of the Red Sox. And to no surprise, he is still producing despite his age. In 2016, Pedey was tied with Betts for second in the AL with a .318 average. So far this season, he is averaging a hit per game. Furthermore, his defense is as strong as ever.

Red Sox Have To Adjust Their Home Run Swings

It’s hard to hit a home run in Fenway, especially if you’re a visiting player. The Green Monster has robbed hundreds, if not thousands of home runs, from hitters. Right field isn’t much better with its deep unique corners. Red Sox hitters learn how to adjust their home run swings for the contours of Fenway. But they find it difficult to adjust in other ballparks.

I noticed this when I was in Baltimore last weekend for their series against the Orioles.home run swings Pablo Sandoval hit a bomb to left field that would have cleared the Green Monster. But it’s between 333-364 feet to left/left center in Camden Yards. That’s another few dozen feet that a ball has to travel for a home run. Sandoval has already hit a few homers over the Green Monster this season. However, the can of corn he hit in Baltimore shows he needs to hit for a tad more power. If Sox players like Sandoval want to hit home runs, they have to remember that most outfields are deeper than Fenway’s.

Jackie Bradley Jr. hit a home run in the second series game that traveled over 450 feet. The ball itself almost hit the B&O Warehouse that overshadows Camden Yards. Ken Griffey Jr. is the only MLB player who has hit the warehouse in Camden Yards’ twenty-five year history. But Bradley Jr. is a lefty and it’s 380 to right center field in Fenway. Bradley hits for power, hence the distance on the home run.

The way the Red Sox hit during the Baltimore series clearly showed that they’re used to playing in Fenway.

Red Sox Have to Adjust Their Home Run Swings When They’re On the Road

The Red Sox can hit for power. Mookie Betts and Jackie Bradley Jr. are becoming home run hitters. Xander Bogaerts isn’t there yet but he will be. Andrew Benintendi still has a ways to go before he’s a power hitter. But players like Sandoval can’t hit to left thinking it’ll clear the wall when they’re in a different ballpark. The Wall, despite its height, its much closer to home than most left fields.

If these hitters want to add more runs to the board they need to look at each ballpark they play in and adjust their home run swings accordingly.

Where Did it All Go Wrong for the Red Sox?

The irony was painful. After a summer of blowout wins and offensive fireworks, the Red Sox succumbed weakly in the fall, unable to locate the big hit when it mattered most. A vaunted lineup, unrivaled in the Majors this season, was stifled by a resilient Cleveland Indians team, as old friend Terry Francona masterminded a Division Series sweep of Boston.

Red Sox

Before the series, few people took the Indians seriously. Three of their best players – Michael Brantley, Carlos Carrasco and Danny Salazar – were missing due to injury. Another star, Corey Kluber, saw his start pushed back due to another ailment. By most measures, the Red Sox were far superior. Most fans predicted a swift sweep. That’s exactly what they got, but of an entirely different flavor.

A Shock for Red Sox Nation

The way it happened was stunning. Boston didn’t play great to close the regular season, but a refreshed approach was expected once the playoffs began. Instead, Red Sox Nation was left waiting, and waiting, and waiting some more, for a team that never showed up. Almost from the first pitch in Cleveland, there was a sense of brewing melodrama. There was a sense that this team had run its course, quite incredibly. The Indians finished the job with shocking rapidity.

Perhaps plain old complacency is to blame. Did the Red Sox simply believe their own hype? That’s difficult to confirm, but it would at least explain the way Boston was caught like a deer in the headlights. When the games really mattered, when the wheat was separated from the chaff, this team wasn’t good enough. It just never got going. And now we’re left to contemplate through the bitter months ahead.

As people digest this loss around the hot stoves of New England, one topic will inspire more debate that any other: the choking offense. So powerful during the regular season, the Red Sox lineup froze on the biggest stage of all.

How Did the Red Sox Get Swept?

While it’s unfair to pinpoint any one guy for criticism, it is worth noting the performance of these praised hitters to paint a collective picture. Dustin Pedroia managed two hits in twelve ALDS at-bats. Mookie Betts, by all consensus an MVP candidate, collected just two in ten. That was better than Jackie Bradley, who produced just one hit, while Xander Bogaerts and Hanley Ramirez combined to go 6-for-24. It just wasn’t good enough.

Even David Ortiz, the master of October baseball, found little magic left in his wand. Papi added just one more hit to his postseason ledger before riding off into the cold night. For once, he couldn’t muster the big blow, and neither could his teammates. The Red Sox left 41 runners on base during this three-game series. They scored just seven runs. In the end, after all the worrying, that ridiculed rotation kept Boston in these games for the most part. The offense just couldn’t deliver.

And so, what now? The Red Sox will seek a replacement for Ortiz, as weird as that sounds. Perhaps John Farrell will see his position as manager reviewed. Maybe Dave Dombrowski will try to address some weaknesses throughout the offseason.

This young core will return to the postseason on plenty of occasions moving forward. But, right now, this was just a step too far for Mookie, Xander, Jackie and the rest. They should learn from the experience, and come back stronger for it. That may not help Red Sox fans deal with the present shock, but it should assist these players in preparing for future assaults on a World Series championship.

Red Sox Winning Streak Sets Them Apart

As of September 22nd, the Boston Red Sox have won seven games in a row. This accomplishment is noteworthy for a team that struggled through the summer. After sweeping the Yankees, the Red Sox traveled to Baltimore where they could very well sweep the Orioles. The Red Sox winning streak is not only good for the team, but it shows other teams that they are a team worthy of a World Series appearance.

Before the season started, many in the Red Sox Nation questioned how strong the team would beRed Sox Winning Streak. Last place finishes two years in a row gave fans little hope this year would be different. But players like Jackie Bradley Jr. and Mookie Betts solidified their hitting and fielding skills. Now, Bradley Jr. might finally clinch the Gold Glove Award that eluded him in 2014. Meanwhile, Betts is in the running for an MVP award.

Two unlikely heroes in the pitching rotation also emerged this season. Steven Wright and Rick Porcello came out of nowhere to prove their worth. Porcello became the MLB’s first 20-game winner this season. As for Wright, while on the disabled list, he may return to the team within days, giving opposing teams more to groan about when they face the Sox. These two pitchers, combined with David Price and the rest of the staff, are showing more potential than ever, especially with Clay Buchholz and Eduardo Rodriguez finally solidifying their game.

Red Sox Winning Streak Signifies World Series Potential

It’s all but certain that the Red Sox are going to the playoffs. Yes, perhaps that’s bit of a bold statement to make at this point, but there’s reason to believe it. Throughout the entire season, other baseball writers and me have commented on the Red Sox inconsistency. Hitting dominated, but pitching didn’t produce. Then pitching dominated for a while, but hitting couldn’t provide enough run support. Fans held their breath going into August as fans and writers alike speculated where the Red Sox would land in the standings. Now that they are playing better than ever, it is becoming safer to assume that Boston will see the Red Sox in the playoffs.

The winning streak won’t last forever, but it doesn’t have to. All the Red Sox have to do now is win the last game of the season, and top it off with another parade through downtown Boston.