Scouting Report: Cole Brannen

After the Boston Red Sox drafted Tanner Houck in the first round, they drafted outfielder Cole Brannen 63rd overall.

Cole Brannen

The 6’1” left-handed hitter is known for his speed and athleticism. As a senior in high school at Westfield (GA), Brannen batted .439 (36-for-82). This came with a total of 23 doubles, three triples, and five home runs. He also scored 42 runs and stole 22 bases, drawing 26 walks against only 11 strikeouts. There is definitely some potential for power, but I think the Red Sox will let him develop based on his young age.

In the summer of 2016, he competed in the Under Armour All-America Game at Wrigley Field and in the Nike Perfect Game All-American Classic at Petco Park.

Due to his tremendous exposure, Brannen had originally committed to play ball at Georgia Southern, but told reporters “I made up my mind. I’ve known for a long time that’s what I want to do. I want to play ball. I’ve wanted to play professional baseball since I was three years old. That’s always been my goal. I’ve worked hard. I’ve put in a lot of time and a lot of effort. God’s given me a lot of things that I can do that a lot of people can’t do. I wouldn’t be where I am if it weren’t for him. I’m very thankful and blessed for all the things I’ve gotten to accomplish.”

Breakdown

There is no question that the hit potential is there. But in addition to that, Brannen’s athleticism allows him not only to steal bases and advance but also to play any of the outfield positions.

However, Brannen doesn’t have a ton of experience against high-level pitching, so there will definitely be at least a few periods of adjustment. Additionally, his swing is a tad lofty, so long-term power as he ages is no guarantee. Despite that, I still see him as a potential plus-hit for average tool.

It is unclear what the Red Sox plan to do with Cole Brannen long-term. But short term, he’ll probably play the rest of the season in the Gulf Coast League. Should he still be with the organization next season, he’ll probably split time between Lowell and Greenville based on his performance.

Right now, I feel comfortable comparing him to Danny Mars or Aneury Tavarez, both of which are other outfielders in the farm system. Brannen’s absolute ceiling would be comparable to Jackie Bradley Jr, but perhaps with less defensive ability.

Is Keeping John Farrell The Right Move?

In the wake of the Red Sox season being swept away, questions arose surrounding much of the ‘behind-the-scenes” personnel. The main focus was on manager John Farrell. After a disappointing end to the season, many fans thought their tenure with Farrell was bound to end. On Tuesday, however, President of Baseball Operations Dave Dombrowski told John FarrellFarrell, in a Fenway Park hallway, that he’d be back as manager in 2017.

John Farrell went through a roller-coaster 2016 season, much like his team, with plenty of criticism. Farrell, the pupil, was completely outmatched by Terry Francona, the teacher, in the ALDS. It all seemed like a fitting end for Farrell’s time in Boston. To the disappointment of many, that was not to be.

The main criticism of John Farrell has been his ability to manage during the game. Bullpen moves, pinch-hitters, and pinch-runners have buried Farrell’s reputation in the Boston market seemingly every game. When asked about the issue Tuesday, Dombrowski told the media that in-game managing was not vital to the job. Once you get past that absolutely unbelievable assumption, the decision to keep Farrell just keeps getting worse.

So, if in-game management doesn’t matter, what did John Farrell do well? Over the course of the year, he has received praise for how he’s worked with the younger players. Xander Bogaerts and Jackie Bradley had All-Star seasons, and Mookie Betts is still the front-runner for MVP; their regular season can not be considered a disappointment. The playoffs, however, were a different story. Those three players went a combined 4-32 in the ALDS with 12 strikeouts. Any way you cut it, those guys were not ready for the post-season.

John Farrell’s So-Called “Pitching Prowess”

Farrell was also seen as something of a pitching guru when he was brought back to the Red Sox in 2013. For about four out of the six months of this 2016 season, the starting pitching was catastrophic. In the post-season, they returned to form. His big ticket, David Price, threw up in the post-season and then choked on his own vomit. For all intents and purposes, he was like the prophet Jonah if Jonah was swallowed by the whale. His starters only went just over 11 innings in the series and none were really effective. Now, he’s not the pitching coach and I get that. That being said, it all falls under him and he is a pitching guy…

So yes, John Farrell will probably lose the blame on Red Sox pitching when Bill Belichick stops receiving blame for the Patriots defense.

When you really look at it, what does Farrell do exceptionally well? How many playoff wins does he have in the last three years? What other playoff manager hurt his team more than John Farrell? To save yourself some time here it is: no, it is not the right move. Farrell’s biggest decision as manager has been to play Travis Shaw over Pablo Sandoval this season. So, yes, John Farrell’s greatest move as manager was playing a better hitter over a third baseman the size of a tow truck. Red Sox Nation best get ready: the manager of your dreams is still in the visitors dugout.

Red Sox On The Brink Of Elimination

With all the optimism September brought for the Red Sox, October is sweeping it away. Winless this month, the Red Sox are facing a harsh reality: elimination. Cleveland quickly became the setting of Red Sox Nation’s nightmares with the debacles of games one and two. After two utter disappointments, the season will hang in the balance of game three on Monday at Fenway.

Game one was seen as crucial in that the Red Sox would need to win to feel Eliminationcomfortable. With Rick Porcello going against Trevor Bauer, it seemed like a sure win for Boston. Porcello, however, dug his own grave in the third inning, giving up three home runs. Even though the Red Sox had the lead twice before that, they were never able to recover. They cut it down to one twice and stranded the tying run at third in the eighth. A gutsy five-out save by Cody Allen closed out a 5-4 Indians victory.

Down 1-0 in the series, David Price got the ball to try and tie the series. This seemed like the perfect setting for Price to “earn” his contract money after an under-performing regular season. Once again, Price couldn’t resist the urge to let us down. Adding to his atrocious postseason resumé, Price gave up five runs on six hits in three and one/third innings. If this were his last start of the season, it would only be fitting. A four-run second inning capped by a three-run home run by Lonnie Chisenhall finished off the Red Sox in game two. An injured Corey Kluber stuffed my foot in my own mouth and shut the Sox out in seven innings en route to a 6-0 victory.

The Smell Of Elimination In The Air

So now the stage is set for the Red Sox. Game three at Fenway with Clay Buchholz on the mound. Dustin Pedroia talked post game about how this performance does not embody the team. Well, it’s time to put up or shut up. Pedroia is just 1-8 this series. Also, David Ortiz, Jackie Bradley, Xander Bogaerts, and Mookie Betts are a combined 3-28 in the first two games. It’s a bit scary to think the only bright spots, offensively, in both games have been Brock Holt and Andrew Benintendi.

A rah-rah kind of speech rarely works in baseball, but if Dustin Pedroia lit a fire under his team, they’ll certainly need it. They sleep-walked in Cleveland and it’s yet to be determined whether they’ll wake up before they walk right off the cliff. History may be on their side, the Red Sox are the only franchise to ever come back from this same deficit in the ALDS twice. The first time they did that was in 1999, coincidentally against Cleveland.

After game two, it really can’t get much worse. Monday should be a slugfest. The Red Sox should get their act together and Buchholz is pitching in Fenway, so the balls should fly. That should favor the league’s best offense, but who knows with this team anymore? Let’s just hope the Red Sox save us the embarrassment of avoiding a sweep. On the bright side, if they lose this series it’ll surely be the end of John Farrell’s tenure. That is, if they have any pride at all. It’s the little things.

Top Prospects Must Stay With Red Sox

As the trade deadline approaches, talks loom about who the Red Sox will let go in exchange for a strong pitcher. The most recent news points to the White Sox scouting players like Yoan Moncada and Andrew Benintendi. According to ESPN, the White Sox sent scouts to watch Boston’s Double-A team on July 28th. Moncada and Benintendi play there now. Personally, I don’t think any pitcher in the MLB is quite worth giving up Moncada or Benintendi, especially Chris Sale. If Boston wants to make it to another World Series, then the Red Sox top prospects must stay in the farm system.

Yoan Moncada has already stolen 43 bases in stints at Single and Double-A this season.Red Sox Top Prospects Must Stay He’ll easily be a .300 average hitter in time. He can also hit for power. The fact that he can play infield, and serve as a designed hitter only adds to his value.

Andrew Benintendi is the next Carl Yastrzemski. He’s currently hitting over .300 with twelve triples between stints at Single and Double-A levels. You can attribute his triples to his developing strength and speed. Overall, he’s developing power, speed, and eye coordination, which will be both offensive and defensive assets. These factors signal that he’ll become a Boston superstar.

Let’s not forget about Michael Kopech. The guy is a wizard on the mound. Anyone his age that can throw 105 MPH is definitely worth keeping around. He pitched a immaculate inning a few weeks ago. He’s currently carrying an ERA of 1.35 in 26 innings this season. While that’s not a lot to bank on right now, it’s a VERY promising sign of what’s to come.

Experts like famed sportswriter Peter Gammons claim that all three of these prospects are “untouchable” and can’t be traded. According to ESPN, however, Dave Dombrowski said last week that “teams’ motivations tend to change as the deadline creeps closer.” Let’s hope that Gammons is right on this one.

Red Sox Top Prospects Must Stay To Create A New Dynasty

Seeing all three of these prospects on the field in Fenway Park in the near future would be riveting. They’ll be a throwback to the days of Yaz, Boggs, and Clemens. Players like Jackie Bradley Jr., Mookie Betts, Steven Wright, and Xander Bogaerts will be veterans by then. They can guide Moncada, Benintendi, and Kopech towards a dynasty that Boston hasn’t seen the likes of since the turn of the 20th century when the Red Sox won five World Series between 1903 and 1918. Moncada, Benintendi, Kopech, and other Red Sox top prospects must stay with the team if this dynasty is ever going to come to fruition.

Jackie Bradley Hit Streak Ends at 29 Games

Jackie Bradley showed Sox nation that he’s arrived offensively at the big league level. During the 29 game hit streak, Bradley hit .415 (44-for-106) with 20 extra-base hits, including eight homers and 30 RBIs. All great things come to an end as Sox fans know with this being the final year for Sox great and one of baseball’s great ambassadors, David Ortiz. However, Bradley has many strong years ahead and this hit streak showed that.

Bradley came into this season with just 700 at bats in the big leagues and 238 gamesJackie Bradley played. So while he technically has three years of major league experience, his plate appearances represent less than two full years of experience. Major league experience is commonly misinterpreted if one just looks at years played. So with under two years of actual playing time and exposure to the highest level, Bradley is on track to being a very strong major league hitter.

Following the hit streak, Bradley’s average sits at .341. While this average is unlikely to persist throughout the rigorous 162 game season, Bradley has shown me he can be a .300 hitter with 20-25 homers. The most impressive component to his game that I have noticed this season is his willingness to go with the ball and use the monster as his best friend. Countless times Bradley has knocked a double off the monster. Bradley also can run, stealing 15 bases out of 15 attempts. To go along with his outstanding defense, Bradley is becoming an all star with all of the work he has put in during the offseason. Meanwhile, some people are questioning whether or not he is using PED’s.

Bradley has always had the reputation of being a listener and having a strong work ethic. The improvements in his game are a product of that rather than PED’s. Nowadays, whenever somebody takes off it seems that the PED questions surface. This is an absolute joke and is a disgrace to the game in general, improvement can be made with work being put in. Bradley has put in the work and as a result he is becoming one of the better hitters in the league. What’s next for Bradley?

Bradley cannot improve much upon the numbers he has put up. In fact, he is likely to regress to a fairly great extent. Bradley will probably end the season with a .304 batting average with 22 homers and 93 RBI. That is regression on his current projected stats based off of his performance thus far, 28 homers and 117 RBI. Bradley has been awesome to watch during his streak and that will not change, Bradley has arrived and he is here to stay.

Red Sox Retire Wade Boggs’ Number

On Thursday, May 26th, the Red Sox retire Wade Boggs’ jersey number 26 during a ceremony at Fenway Park. Boggs played for the Boston Red Sox from 1982 to 1992 before departing for the New York Yankees in 1993. During his time in Boston, Boggs won six Silver Slugger Awards (eight overall), was on seven all-star teams (12 overall). Boggs also played on the 1986 American League championship team that lost the World Series after a devastating error made in Game 6, leading the New York Mets to win Game 7 and the series. As the Red Sox retire Wade Boggs’ number, another legend is honored for his accomplishments.

Some aren’t happy that Boggs’ number is being retired for several reasons. First, BoggsRed Sox Retire Wade Boggs didn’t finish his career in Boston. In order to have your number retired by the Red Sox, you have to meet certain requirements, but in recent years those requirements have been ignored. The requirements include playing ten years for the Red Sox, be a member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and retire from baseball as a member of the Boston Red Sox. Several players whose numbers are retired by the Red Sox do not meet those requirements. Pedro Martinez did not play for Boston for ten years, nor did he finish his career in Boston. Carlton Fisk finished his career in Chicago with the White Sox. Johnny Pesky isn’t in the Baseball Hall of Fame. If these are rules that former players have to follow, then why are they suddenly being discarded? Perhaps it’s time to discard the rules altogether and examine likely candidates on a case by case basis. That would make it much easier for Dwight Evans‘ number to also be retired.

Others are mad at Boggs because he played for the New York Yankees, our longtime rivals. Honestly, one can’t blame Boggs for leaving. Like any player in his position, Boggs wanted a World Series ring and frankly, the Boston Red Sox weren’t showing a level of skill that was going to get them to a World Series. Not to mention the Red Sox weren’t willing to give Boggs the contract he deserved to resign with the team in 1993. Boggs had many good years left in him, which he proved when he joined the Yankees, but the Red Sox refused to honor that, with Boggs being one of many good players the team has lost in years past. Let’s hope that lesson is something Dave Dombrowski keeps in mind when Jackie Bradley Jr., Mookie Betts, and Brock Holt’s contracts end.

Another legend will join the ranks of Boston greats when the Red Sox retire Wade Boggs’ number on May 26th! The ceremony will start shortly before the 7:05 game against the Colorado Rockies.