Holt and Kelly Reignite Rivalry Between Sox and Yankees

There hasn’t been much of a rivalry between the Boston Red Sox and New York Yankees since the Sox won the 2004 World Series. In fact, the two teams seemed almost amicable in recent years. That all changed Wednesday night though when Red Sox and Yankees brawled it out during the second of a three game series. It started with Brock Holt contesting a slide, and ended with Joe Kelly punching Tyler Austin. Seeing Holt and Kelly reignite the rivalry not only makes the game more exciting, but will intensify the Red Sox quest for another World Series Championship.

It all began Wednesday night when the Yankees’ Tyler Austin slid into second base andKelly reignites clipped Holt’s leg with his spikes. Holt and Austin exchanged words and the benches cleared but no one threw punches. That is, until the top of the 7th inning. Reliever Joe Kelly faced Austin and proceeded to throw inside pitches before finally clunking Austin in the ribs. Austin retaliated by charging the mound where he and Kelly exchanged blows. Once again, both teams cleared their benches. As a result, Kelly received a six-game suspension and Austin received a five-game penalty. Red Sox manager Alex Cora and Yankee third base coach Phil Nevin were fined for their part in the brawl.

Holt and Kelly Reignite a Century-Old Feud

The Boston Red Sox took two out of the three game series, making them 10-2 as of April 13th. The two losses pushed the Yankees back to 6-7 and third place in the AL East. But while it’s too early to tell whether the two teams will be playoff contenders come the fall, one thing is certain: Baseball’s biggest rivalry is back.

“They have a pretty good team over there,” Holt said of the Yankees in a masslive.com article. “It happened. Typical Red Sox-Yankee game. About four hours long and a couple bench-clearing brawls. So we’re right on track here.”

Red Sox nation couldn’t be happier.

Henry Owens, Brian Johnson Soon to Join Rotation

Prior to a third straight pitching debacle against the Chicago White Sox, manager John Farrell just casually mentioned to the media that both Brian Johnson and Henry Owens should get the call in the next week. These starters are ranked No. 4 and No. 5 respectively overall in the Boston Red Sox farm system

“We’re going to stay on turn through the weekend,” Farrell said according to NESN’s Ricky Brian Johnsondoyle. “Monday being the off-day, we’ve got the ability to adjust going forward. But as we’re taking a look at (recently recalled outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr.), our goal and our intent is to see Brian Johnson and probably Henry Owens at some point. So, all that is on the horizon.”

With pitchers Joe Kelly (2-6, 5.94 ERA), Justin Masterson (4-2, 5.62 ERA) and Rick Porcello (5-11, 5.81 ERA) struggling for most of the season and knuckleballer Steve Wright being a 30-year-old journeyman who is more of a spot starter than a long-term option in the rotation, it makes sense to bring up the young pitchers to see if they should be kept or dealt this off season.

Eduardo Rodriguez has proven that he has some work to do, but has pitched admirably while up with the Boston Red Sox this season to the tune of a 4.26 ERA in 11 starts to go along with a 6-3 record and a 52:20 K:BB ratio. The 22-year-old should be in the starting rotation to start the 2016 season

The Red Sox already got a look at Johnson last week as he went 4.1 innings while allowing four earned runs. He may have walked four batters in the outing and thrown more curve balls than fastballs, but the prospect proved he could pitch even with less than stellar stuff on the mound. The fastball topped out at 90 and he can’t blow away anyone, but he showed strong composure for a 24-year-old.

As for Owens, the 23-year-old had a tough go of it to start the 2015 season in Pawtucket, but is 1-4 with a 2.86 ERA over his last 10 starts. Over that span, he has walked just 18 and struck out 54 in 63 innings of work, including a couple nine strikeout contests on July 10th and July 18th in which he allowed three earned runs over 13 innings of work.

The Red Sox need to see which of these lefties will be a mainstay going forward and what better time than now when the team is all but mathematically eliminated from postseason contention.