War Hero Ted Williams Fought For Our Freedoms

Most people are outraged that neo-nazis and white supremacists are trying to make a comeback. My great-uncle fought nazis. He didn’t risk his life just to see these weak-minded a$$hats walk the streets thinking they’re superior to everyone else. In fact, it does a grave dishonor to those baseball players who volunteered to fight in World War II. War Hero Ted Williams, along with Johnny Pesky, Bobby Doerr, and many others exchanged a bat for a gun to defend America. These whites supremacists dishonor every American who fought the Axis powers in World War II.

The game of baseball itself has survived multiple wars and conflicts. President Franklin D.war hero ted williams Roosevelt urged Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis to continue to the game despite the war. “I honestly feel that it would be best for the country to keep baseball going,” Roosevelt wrote to Landis. “There will be fewer people unemployed and everybody will work longer hours and harder than ever before. And that means that they ought to have a chance for recreation and for taking their minds off their work even more than before.”

Roosevelt was right. More than ever American civilians had to make sacrifices in ways they’d never imagined. Commodities became scarce. Blackouts threw cities into darkness in the event that nazi or Japanese bombers made it to the continental United States. Most importantly, 400,000 Americans gave their lives to defeat Hitler and the Axis powers. All American stepped up to defeat defeating Hitler.

War Hero Ted Williams, And Many Others, Sacrificed Their Best Years

Players like the Tigers’ Hank Greenberg, the Braves’ Warren Spahn, and the Indians’ Bob Feller signed up for service. Spahn saw combat at the Battle of the Bulge. Feller fought on battleships in the Pacific. Williams didn’t see combat, but he gave up three of his best career years to serve his country. In fact, according to bleacherreport.com, Williams would have hit .342 with 3,452 hits, 663 home runs and 2,380 RBI if he hadn’t missed five years (two more in Korea) to wartime service. He not only gave up those career years, he did so willingly to defend our nation.

Service To Country Was More Important

According to the same source, Feller would have retired with a 362-210 record, a 3.11 ERA and 3,565 strikeouts. Spahn would have had over 400 career wins. But it wasn’t about projected numbers and sacrificing career years. It was about serving their country and doing what’s right. When the war broke out, Feller volunteered for service, “I didn’t have to [fight],” Fellar said in a 2006 interview. “I was 23 and strong-bodied…but with my father terminally ill back in Van Meter, Iowa, I was exempt from military service…It didn’t matter to me. I wanted to join the fight against Hitler and the Japanese.”

White Supremacy Dishonors War Hero Ted Williams And All Those Who Sacrificed

To watch what happened in Charlottesville last weekend could make one wonder what year it is. 1941 or 2017? Those white supremacists, who likely had relatives that fought in World War II, carried the flag that represented the very evil their relatives gave their lives for. Baseball players like Williams risked their lives because Hitler went to war in an effort to force the world to subscribe to his belief system. He lost, but there are those who want to continue the fight.

Unfortunately, these same scumbag white supremacists want to hold a rally in Boston this weekend. I gave serious thought to going to the counter-protest as a way of showing them I don’t want them here. Then I thought about it a little more. As much as I hate nazis, white supremacists, or anyone else who thinks they’re better than others because of the color of one’s skin, I’m not going to give them the pleasure. It’s exactly what these vermin want. So instead of attending a counter protest, I’m going to do the very things that war hero Ted Williams and many others risk their lives in order for me to do. It’s because of servicepeople like Williams, Feller, and Spahn that I can choose to attend a rally or not. So instead of giving attention to nazis, I’m going to do something else. Watch baseball.

Baseball Is Freedom

I’m going to watch the Red Sox destroy the Yankees at Fenway Park. I’ll watch Andrew Benintendi hit more home runs. I’ll watch Chris Sale strike out fourteen Yankees. I’m going to hang out with my friend Anthony, and we’re going to drink a lot of beer. And we’re going to do it under the retired number 9, war hero Ted Williams’ number, the man who served his country so that people like me could have the freedom so many take for granted.

Watching baseball is freedom. We proudly sing the National Anthem before each ballgame. We root for who we want. While it may not look like it, watching baseball instead of engaging white supremacists at a rally is a form of pushing them back. Baseball is freedom. When people think of freedom many think of baseball. While I’d love nothing more than to punch every nazi in the face 247,000 times each, I’m going to live by President Roosevelt’s words, “[Americans] ought to have a chance for recreation and for taking their minds off their work.” In my case, I’m taking my mind off of white supremacy; I’m taking my attention away from them.

That’s what they want and they won’t get it from me.

Red Sox Prepare To Retire Ortiz’s No. 34

Festivities to honor David Ortiz are already underway as the Red Sox prepare to honor Big Papi by retiring his number 34 before Friday night’s game against the Los Angeles Angels. For only the eleventh time in their history, the Red Sox will retire the number of one of its greats. What makes this retirement ceremony unique is that it has only been eight months since Ortiz played his last game.

Retiring Ortiz’s number so soon reflects a deep love and appreciation for Big Papi. OrtizRed Sox Prepare wasn’t just a great hitter who played most of his career in Boston. Ortiz was a symbol of hope in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing. His words, “This is our f–king city!” became a rallying cry for discouraged Bostonians. Later that fall his home run against the Detroit Tigers in the ALCS staved off defeat and allowed the Red Sox to advance to the World Series. In a time when Hall of Fame-caliber players are few and far in between, Ortiz’s heroics not only made the Red Sox great, but made baseball even greater.

Qualifications Have Waned in Recent Years As Red Sox Prepare For Jersey Retirement

The Red Sox used to have very strict requirements when it came to retiring a jersey number. The strict set of requirements allowed a select few to see their numbers retired. First, the player had to have played for the Red Sox for ten years. Second, he has to be in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Third, he had to have retired with the Red Sox. While those rules stood for many years, one by one, the Red Sox accommodate other greats who didn’t meet the requirements.

Carlton Fisk, the greatest catcher in Red Sox history, finished his career with the Chicago White Sox. Pedro Martinez didn’t play ten years with the Red Sox, and finished his career with the Philadelphia Phillies. Johnny Pesky isn’t a Hall of Famer, but his service to the team over the course of sixty years earned him a spot among the retired.

While Ortiz didn’t have to wait for induction into the Hall of Fame to see his number retired, his induction will happen. Some say Ortiz won’t be a first ballot Hall of Famer. Allegations surrounding his use of PEDs have haunted him for years. Those allegations should have little to no impact on the BBWAA when Ortiz becomes eligible. One this is for sure though. Bostonians will pack the small town of Cooperstown when it comes time to induct Ortiz.

Fenway Feature #2: What makes Pesky’s Pole so pesky?

Pesky's Pole

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If you haven’t been to Fenway Park, or you don’t know your Red Sox retired jersey numbers, you may be a little confused on what The Pesky Pole, is. You may ask yourself “what’s so pesky about this pole?”

First of all, let’s just talk about the pole. It’s the right field foul pole. It’s 302 feet from home plate (though this is constantly being disputed…).

Pesky's Pole

So what’s so Pesky about this pole? Well, nothing is “pesky” about it. It’s named after Johnny Pesky!

Pesky's Pole

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Johnny Pesky was #6 for the Boston Red Sox between 1942-1952. Well, take out 1943-45, since he took time off to serve in the Navy during World War II. He was the shortstop, second and third basemen in his playing days.

I could write on and on about Johnny Pesky, but for your sake, I won’t. Basically, he was a really awesome player and all around good guy. His number was retired in 2008 by the Red Sox.

Supposedly, Johnny Pesky’s teammate, Mel Parnell, named the pole “Pesky Pole” after Pesky hit a homerun down the right field line, wrapping just around the pole, and won the game for Parnell. Turns out that that never happened, but either way, we still call it “Pesky Pole”, especially after Mel Parnell was the Red Sox broadcaster.

On Pesky’s 87th birthday in 2006, the Red Sox officially dedicated the pole as Pesky’s Pole and there is a commemorative plaque place there now.

So on your next trip to Fenway Park, make sure to check out Pesky’s Pole in right field! It’s a big yellow pole, so you can’t miss it!