Sea Dog’s Nick Lovullo And Tate Matheny Just Like Their Old Man-ager

Infielder Nick Lovullo and center fielder Tate Matheny moved up the ladder to the Portland Sea Dogs. They’re also the sons of St. Louis Cardinals manager Mike Matheny and Arizona Diamondbacks manager Torey Lovullo. The Cardinals played the Diamondbacks during their home opener this season, which served as the one time the two teammates had opposing rooting interests.

Matheny played in the big leagues for 12 years. As a catcher for the Cardinals, he was on the other side of the Red Sox’s historic World Series victory in 2004. He took over the managerial position in 2012 after Tony La Russa led the Cardinals to a World Series title in 2011 just before retiring. Just a year later, Matheny and Lovullo were on opposing dugouts during the 2013 World Series. Lovullo was Boston’s bench coach for manager John Farrell’s staff. He followed Farrell to Fenway after two years in Toronto as the first base coach.

For Lovullo, the Blue Jays job followed a decade long coaching career in the minor leagues. Nick was a freshman on the Holy Cross baseball team the year his father celebrated winning the World Series at Fenway Park. In Lovullo’s last season as the Red Sox’s bench coach, Nick was starting his professional career with the Lowell Spinners 30 miles north of Boston.

2016: The Year of Two Lovullo Pros

2016 was a special year for the Lovullos, as Torey would go see Nick play short season Single-A ball in Lowell and Nick would then be in attendance for the Red Sox’s post season series against the Cleveland Indians. Torey got to see Nick get his first hit as a pro on Father’s Day.

“Lowell will always have a special place in my heart,” Nick said.

The Arizona managerial job was a dream come true for the senior Lovullo. Nick split his time last season as a Red Sox minor leaguer and Diamondback fanatic.

“It was pretty special, he said. “Knowing that when he got done playing, that was his goal. His dream was to become a Major League manager. I saw firsthand on how hard he worked.”