Xander Bogaerts is the Best Shortstop in Baseball

Xander Bogaerts is the best shortstop in the league and is overlooked by many. He came up in the Sox system and people marked him as a guy who had a 30 homer bat. The power hasn’t been there up to this stage in his career but even if he doesn’t develop into a power hitter, Bogaerts is as good as it gets in the batters box in baseball. While teammate Jackie Bradley Jr. has a 27 game hitting streak, some may not know that Bogaerts hasXander Bogaerts best shortstop the second longest hitting streak in baseball at 16 games.

Bogaerts has recorded a hit in 28 of his last 30 games and leads the American League in batting average at .346. During his hit streak he is hitting .403 with five doubles, three homers and four RBI’s. The most impressive part of the streak is the three homers. While Bogaerts was tabbed as a guy who had power potential down on the farm, that power has never shown at the big league level.

Is Bogaerts the Best Shortstop?

Many said Bogaerts could eventually develop into a 30 homer bat at a shortstop position where that type of power is very hard to come by. To put it in perspective, the last time a shortstop hit 30 homers in a season was in 2011, done so by Troy Tulowitzki and J.J Hardy. If Bogaerts ends up hitting 30 homers in multiple seasons, he may end up being one of the best offensive shortstops ever to play the game. Still 23 years old, Bogaerts could end up hitting in the 20-25 homer range at best. I do not see that happening until at least 25 years old though as he continues to evolve as a major league hitter. If the power doesn’t develop, what is Bogaerts potential?

Sox fans may remember a guy named Derek Jeter. When watching Bogaerts hit all I can think of is Jeter. They both spray the ball all over the field and are extremely tough to get out. The most homers Jeter hit in a season was 24, done so in 1999, his fifth season in the big leagues. Bogaerts is in his fourth season this year and will likely finish around 15-20 homers. Jeter got off to a faster start in his major league career than Bogaerts but Bogaerts figured it out last season having a better third season than Jeter had.

The comparison to Jeter may come off as far fetched but having the luxury of watching both of them play has been awesome and they are both very similar hitters offensively. Bogaerts still has a lot of time to cement his own legacy in the game and his great season last year followed by his torrid start this season should have Sox fans excited as we may have the new Jeter wearing number two in a Sox uniform.

Rusney Castillo Returns to PawSox from Disabled List

Rusney Castillo

Rusney Castillo returned to the Pawtucket Red Sox on Wednesday night after being activated from the disabled list, and went 0-4 with a strikeout as the designated hitter in their 5-1 loss against the Syracuse Chiefs. He was not in the lineup for Pawtucket’s 4-0 victory over the Chiefs on Thursday, which had an early start time of 12 PM.

Castillo had been sidelined since April 11 with a right shoulder injury,Rusney Castillo and John Farrell has expressed that he will need more playing time before having any chance of being called up to the majors.

“He’s missed significant time,” Farrell told Jimmy Toscano of CSNNE.com. “He’s going to need more than three to four at-bats tonight, or six to eight total. I think we need more than that.”

In four games for Pawtucket this season, Castillo is hitting .313/.353/.375 with a double and two runs batted in. He played in 10 major league games for the Red Sox last season, where he slashed a .333/.400/.528 line with two home runs, a double, three walks and six runs batted in.

With Shane Victorino on the disabled list, and Allen Craig struggling mightily at the plate, many are left to wonder how long it will be before Castillo gets the call.

Victorino was placed on the disabled list retroactive to April 25 because of nagging right hamstring injury, and has managed to do little offensively this season, hitting .143/.302/.171 with seven strikeouts in 12 games.

Craig has largely failed to live up the expectations the Red Sox had for him when they acquired him from the St. Louis Cardinals along with Joe Kelly in exchange for John Lackey at least season’s trade deadline. In 46 career games for the Red Sox, Craig has managed to hit only .125/.222/.172 with only four extra-base hits, including .118/.189/.118 with no extra-base hits in 17 games this season.

Although Boston’s offense has looked very good at times, they have still run into patches of inconsistency and at points been unable to take advantage of some good pitching performances, which have been hard to come by these days. After Castillo gets some more playing time in Pawtucket, it should only be a matter of time before you see him roaming the outfield at Fenway Park.

A Deep Red Sox Lineup is Farrell’s Biggest Weapon

Red Sox lineup

As Boston pounded Philadelphia on Opening Day, churning out eight runs on nine hits, baseball fans were reminded how, despite incessant worries of porous pitching and overcrowded outfields, the Red Sox have a stacked lineup this year that will be extremely difficult to navigate.

Red Sox LineupThree of the first four hitters, namely Mookie Betts, Dustin Pedroia and Hanley Ramirez, combined for seven hits, five home runs and eight RBI, largely off Cole Hamels, one of the premier starting pitchers in baseball. Such a profound offensive barrage sent shock waves reverberating through the American League.

Meanwhile, David Ortiz, playing first base in a National League park, and newcomer Pablo Sandoval, making his Red Sox debut, went hitless and registered six strikeouts between them. The fact that the Sox hammered the Phillies despite two key guys struggling shows just how deep the Boston lineup is, and how frightening it will become when all of the aforementioned hitters, plus Mike Napoli, find their groove.

The hypothetical top six of Betts, Pedroia, Ortiz, Ramirez, Sandoval and Napoli is quite possibly the most fearsome in all of baseball. It forces a pitcher to deal with a wide array of threats, from the speed and dynamism of Mookie to the switch-hitting and raw power of Pablo; from the patience and hunger of Pedroia to the experience and production of Ortiz. Even Hamels, an elite ace, struggled out of the gate on Opening Day, when faced with the prospect of running Boston’s offensive gauntlet, causing many people to sit up and take notice.

This year, the Red Sox’ lineup will wear down a lot of pitchers and, judging by the early results, collect a lot of big hits. Following a dismal 2014 season, during which Boston lurked near the bottom of every offensive category, it will be a welcome relief for fans to finally have hitters to believe in and rely upon.

It must also be a pleasant change for manager John Farrell, who now has the luxurious ability to mix and match his lineup. For instance, if Ortiz struggles to hit for average, Ramirez could easily move up in the order, just as Pedroia could move down to be replaced in the two hole by Shane Victorino or Xander Bogaerts, further lengthening Boston’s attack.

Certainly, the Red Sox stand out as an offensive force in the American League East, and, if healthy and consistent, the string of prolific hitters atop their lineup could negate the lack of pitching depth to make Boston a serious contender, especially playing their home games at hitter-friendly Fenway.

Regardless of how the season ends, be it with celebrations or commiserations, Sox fans can rest assured that the start was explosive, exciting and entertaining. For the first time in a long while, Boston was back in the baseball spotlight, garnering positive attention for an offensive onslaught rather than negative criticism for hitting profligacy.

Quite frankly, Ben Cherington couldn’t have dreamed it up better.

Holy Carp and Set-Up Men Off the Hook Again

mike carp holy carp

Wow, Mike Carp, just WOW! Instead of “Holy Mackerel,” the people of Boston should say “Holy CARP!” from here on out. Who knew he had it in him?

Last Wednesday was a perfect example of the Red Sox down in runs, then pulling themselves up by their offensive bootstraps to earn the win. The comparisons to the 2004 team, though hackneyed at this point, are seemingly legitimate. After all, when was the last time we saw play like this by our beloved team? Ok, maybe it was a few games ago. I’ll give you that one.

God love Ryan Dempster for consistently earning “no decisions” during his starts in the last month. He must have a horseshoe stashed somewhere on his person. The offense has rallied back for him on a number of those no decision games. I am sure his fellow starting pitchers fume over his luck.

The real problem, which put the Sox into this situation, is the lack of set-up men in the bullpen. The similarities between the middle men on the defensive side and the middle of the lineup on the offensive side are uncanny. There is a dip in performance on both sides. Defensively, what is there to do, but determine through trial and error what the best mixture of pitchers will precede closer Koji Uehara? John Farrell’s calculated changes work for this team. Perhaps changes can help with pitching.

One other question remains with regard to the offense: must we rely on what seems to be a team of clutch hitters to get us through the American League Division Series? It seems the answer is “Yes.” These guys have a dramatic flair. Games are not over till them over; thus is the fight, grit, and stick-to-itiveness of this Red Sox team.

Was Jake Peavy Worth It?

jake peavy

Courtesy overthemonster.com

I realize it truly remains to be seen, but I will ask the question now: was the trade for Jake Peavy worth it? His last appearance left many fans wondering if it was a good move. Sources said that he had a proven track record of not performing on the road. If the Red Sox knew that, why did we pick him? It isn’t until Peavy has a bad start that we hear the negative. Does that mean he will only be great at home? That won’t get us to the post season with only 20 home games left. He’s scary because he doesn’t have the control we need and he has the potential to be an emotional loose cannon. I like the energy, but too much of a good thing can be dangerous.

We gave away a top prospect in Jose Iglesias for an okay pitcher. Yet, again we grow great talent only to give it away and see it flourish with another team. I said the numbers didn’t add up when the trade took place. He’s meh. Now where does that leave us? In a lot of trouble is where. We have a limping John Lackey, which is unfortunate because he was a sure thing. John Lester right now seems to be pitching all over the place except for inside the strike zone. Felix is okay. And Dempter, is well, Dempster. So where is the added value in Peavy?

This poor pitching paints the Red Sox offense into a corner. They must produce in a big way, early and often. We cannot have tight games like we did with the Royals. Our schedule from here on out is not an easy one. While I am confident John Farrell will figure something out, the truth of the matter is he can only run the ball so far. The players must perform. And Peavy, that means you!

Red Sox Starting Pitchers We Got, Offense, Closer Needed

red sox starting pitchers

Stop over swinging! Courtesy of bostonglobe.com

The Red Sox starting pitchers are in decent shape, what needs work is the offense. I cannot tell you how many times I see some of our top sluggers swing at pitches that are clearly balls. Papi, Pedroia, and sometimes Napoli… I am looking at you! If you have to nearly throw your back out reaching across the plate to hit the ball, it is probably not worth swinging at to begin with. This type of wild swinging takes place later in games, and smacks of desperation. The Red Sox offense needs to hit early and often, so the team can get into a rhythm of good pitch selection and good contact with the ball.

Now that I have single-handedly solved the offense problem, ::slyly blows on knuckles and brushes them on shirt::, let’s turn to another weakness— the Bullpen. The closer, or closers, have not been strong enough, which is why I continue to advocate that the Sox trade, or pick up, a closer. Andrew, “The Yeti” (as I like to call him) Miller is down with a twisted ankle.  Koji Uehara can sometimes get it done, other times, not so much. The same seems true for Bailey, Wilson, Aceves, and whomever we bring up from Pawtucket this week. Who is the guy to close out our games? Have we tried Steven Wright, and if so, why not? Wright was named International Pitcher of the Week. I think we should bring Wright up to the bullpen, to mix things up in the later innings. Other sources feel Rubby De La Rosa would be a good person for that bullpen position, but I just think he is more of the same. The other teams are expecting that kind of pitching move. The last thing the Sox should want to be right now is predictable. Let’s keep everyone guessing.

Yes, there has been a lot of movement in that position, just no curveballs (pun very much intended!)