Chris Sale, the Red Sox Ace of the Future

On Opening Day, the Red Sox ace, Chris Sale, will be on the mound. For Sale, this is the second time that he is opening for Alex Cora and the Red Sox. He currently joins a select group of Red Sox pitchers who have started in Opening Day, from Babe Ruth, to Rick Porcello.

Nearing the end of Spring Training, more good news came for Chris Sale when he signedRed Sox ace a five year contract extension to stay with the Red Sox. Sale, who went 12-4 with a 2.11 ERA in 158 innings last season, deserved this contract extension. So far in his career, he is 103-32 with a 2.89 ERA through 9 seasons.

Red Sox Ace, Chris Sale

The former Chicago White Sox ace has fit in nicely since being acquired by the Red Sox prior to the 2017 season. His resume keeps improving, and in his first season in Boston he started out with a bang. Sale struck out 10 or more batters in a row for eight consecutive games, which is tied for the major league record. He also led the majors with 308 strikeouts. His efforts on the mound have caught the eye of many over the years, and this was no different. Boston finally got its well deserved ace in Sale.

In Chicago, Chris Sale was known to wear the number 49. However, after being traded to Boston, he changed it to number 41, out of respect to former Red Sox pitcher, Tim Wakefield. For those who were fans of the knuckleballer, this was a great display of respect from Sale.

At the rate he is going, one can only wonder if #41 will be up in the rafters alongside other Red Sox greats, and the only other pitcher, Pedro Martinez.

Another Year, Another Sale Day

For those who follow the Boston Red Sox on social media, you’re well aware of the Sale Day hashtag. Now, we get to see it until the end of the 2024 season. The Condor, as he is known, is looking to continue to make history on the mound. Being able to play in Boston is part of that history.

In the 2018 postseason, his second in his career, Sale pitched in Game One of both the ALDS and the ALCS, as well as Game One of the World Series. Sale also did something else remarkable in the World Series as well – closing out Game 5 to seal the deal in LA. Who was the last pitcher to start Game 1 then close out the final game? Madison Bumgarner of the San Francisco Giants in the 2014 World Series.

What will this season bring to those glorious Sale Days that we long live for? For many, it’s another chance to watch the strikeout machine at work. At 29 years old, the sky’s the limit for Sale. So far, he has been selected to 7 straight All-Star games, and has led the American League in strikeouts twice. in 2017, Sale became the fastest pitcher to record 1,500 strikeouts, and he is 211 away from 2,000.

Another goal for Red Sox ace Sale – To win another World Series in Boston…

Red Sox Update: Two Days Until Opening Day

With two days until Opening Day in Seattle and with ample activity occurring in the past week, here is a quick Red Sox update. Chris Sale signed a 5-yr/$145 million contract on Saturday to remain with the team through 2024. Also on Saturday, the Red Sox made the final cuts to their bullpen. Darwinzon Hernandez was sent to Double-A Portland, while Bobby Poyner and Marcus Walden were optioned to Triple-A Pawtucket. Manager Alex Cora stated that Jenrry Mejia would not make the Opening Day roster as well.

Bullpen is set…for now

The Sox bullpen will consist of Matt Barnes, Ryan Brasier, Colten Brewer, Heath Hembree,Red Sox Update Brian Johnson, Tyler Thornburg, Hector Velazquez and Brandon Workman to begin 2019.

On Monday, Sandy Leon, who had been with the Red Sox since 2015, was placed on waivers. Later that day, Rick Porcello was hit in the head with a ‘comebacker’ by Cubs catcher Willson Contreras. He “laughed” it off and stayed in the game. What?!?

Arguably the most substantial news happened last Wednesday. In an interview with reporters, reigning AL MVP Mookie Betts was asked about Angels outfielder Mike Trout’s new record breaking contract. “I love it here in Boston. It’s a great spot. I’ve definitely grown to love going up north in the cold. That doesn’t mean I want to sell myself short of my value.”

Also in this Red Sox Update

It was announced very early this morning that reigning World Series MVP Steve Pearce will begin 2019 on the Injured List (IL) due to a left calf injury. Sam Travis will serve as Boston’s backup first baseman in Seattle.

Just over a week ago on March 18, Cora announced that second baseman Dustin Pedroia will also begin the season on the Injured List. Pedroia could make his debut on April 9th on Boston’s first home game of the season versus Toronto.

Dustin Pedroia – The Next Comeback Player of the Year?

A certain second baseman is making a comeback for the 2019 campaign. This player is entering his fourteen major league season. He is also currently is the longest serving member of the Boston Red Sox.

Dustin Pedroia made his Major League debut on August 22nd, 2006 against the Loscomeback Angeles Angels of Anaheim. I doubt that Pedroia would think that a year later he would be on his way to not only win the Rookie of the Year award, but also win his first of many World Series championships.

The Man Who Wears #15…

When you look at second base, the player that is usually there wears the number 15. The man many fans know as Pedey, Laser Show and The Muddy Chicken, is making a comeback. When Pedroia came into Spring Training this year, he looked like a whole different person. Pedroia signed an eight year contract extension back on July 23rd 2013. This occurred about three months prior to the Red Sox winning another World Series championship, and about a week after playing in his fourth All Star game.

When you look at Pedroia, he’s not your typical second baseman, however, when he’s on the field, he gives everything he’s got. Many Red Sox fans know about his knee injury, and we also know about the slide seen around the world.

Since then, Pedroia underwent another knee surgery. Due to that, his time on the field in 2018 was limited to three games. One can only hope that this will be the year that Pedroia goes out and seeks revenge. If he does pull it off, he could ultimately win the American League Comeback Player of the Year Award.

Can Pedroia Pull Off The Comeback?

The amount and time that he has given to coming back to play in the 2019 season is great, especially for someone as tough as Pedroia.

It was reported on March 18th that Pedroia will be continuing his rehab assignments, while the team is in Seattle for Opening Day. However, that is not stopping him from continuing to work hard and keep getting stronger. From the looks of it, the Pedroia of old arrived in camp back in February. The lingering question, of course, is how many games he will play once Cora puts him into the Red Sox lineup. Well, only time can really tell. That, and Pedroia, the man on a mission.

Red Sox Breakdown Halfway Through Spring Training

The reigning champs sent postseason Red Sox hero David Price to the mound Tuesday. He made his first start since World Series Game 5 when he pitched seven dominant innings, allowing just three hits and one earned run — en route to being snubbed as World Series MVP (the award went to his teammate Steve Pearce).

spring training schedule

Price pitched 3 innings on Tuesday afternoon, allowing two hits, two earned runs, and two walks. He also struck out four and forced three ground outs in a losing effort.

So far in this edition of the Grapefruit League season, Boston owns a record of 7 wins and 11 losses. Rafael Devers, who many Boston fans expect to be the long-term answer at third base, leads the team with 11 hits in 23 at-bats. He is reportedly making a push for hitting third in the lineup this season. The Sox top prospect, Michael Chavis leads the team in home runs (4) and runs batted in (10) in 11 Grapefruit League contests. He was, nonetheless, demoted to Triple-A Pawtucket yesterday.

Starting rotation

Entering his fifth season as a starter is Eduardo Rodriguez, who leads the club with three Spring starts to date. Along with Rodriguez, locks to begin the regular season in the starting rotation are Rick Porcello, Price, Nathan Eovaldi, and Chris Sale.

Porcello made his Spring debut over the weekend (Sunday, March 10). He, along with Price, surrendered two runs in three innings. He also allowed two home runs on four hits while striking out one. Sale and Eovaldi have yet to pitch.

Relief struggles

The largest cause for concern is the Boston bullpen. Last season’s closer Craig Kimbrel (42 saves, 0.99 WHIP) is still a free agent and has yet to sign with a ballclub. Team general manager, Dave Dombrowski, has elected to promote 2019’s closer from within the organization. With the season starting on March 28, here is a quick glance at the Spring relief effort so far:

Matt Barnes – 2 innings, 3 earned runs; Tyler Thornburg – 4 innings, 7 earned runs; Brandon Workman – 5 innings, 4 earned runs; Colten Brewer – 5 innings, 5 earned runs; Bobby Poyner – 7 innings, 2 earned runs; Erasmo Ramirez – 8 innings, 6 earned runs.

Brian Johnson and Hector Velazquez, both whom remain on the active roster, have each started two games this Spring and have allowed a combined 12 earned runs.

Plenty of depth

The light has shined bright on Darwinzon Hernandez and Marcus Walden.  Both have pitched 8 innings and allowed 1 earned run to this point. However, neither have yet to put together a full big league season in their careers, respectively. Jenrry Mejia has pitched 4 innings this Spring, but has not pitched in a regular season game since 2015 due to a previous lifetime ban from the MLB in 2016.

Two of 2018’s staples in the pen are Heath Hembree and Ryan Brazier. Neither have pitched to date.

There is still much to be sorted out for the Sox. Will starting ace Chris Sale be on a pitch limit this year due to last year’s issues of shoulder soreness and fatigue? Does Dustin Pedroia, who is being casted as the team’s starting second baseman, plate his first 500 at-bat season since 2016 due to his unshakable injury history? Can the 2019 Red Sox make it back to the playoffs, after falling to the bottom of the AL East in the two seasons following their last title in 2013? Good news is, it’s just about time for all of these questions, and many more, to be answered — with Opening Day just sixteen days away in Seattle.

Rays Not The Same Without Evan Longoria

The Boston Red Sox opened the 2018 season at Tampa Bay by taking 3-of-4 games against the Rays. While the Rays were paying tribute to the 1998 inaugural team, they were doing so without Evan Longoria.

The Rays were one franchise before Longoria and a completely different one during his decade long tenure at Tropicana Field. In Tampa Bay’s first 10 years in MLB, they were known as the Devil Rays and their lone highlight was Wade Boggs hitting a home runs for his 3,000 hit.

Longoria made his MLB debut in 2008. The Rays, dropped the “Devil” and clinched their first winning season, division title, and World Series appearance. The Rays were on the other side of the Red Sox’s 2011 “chicken and beer” collapse. Their last playoff appearance was a ALDS loss to the Red Sox in 2013 but they were close to returning last year.

Longoria is a career .270 hitter who led the Rays with 261 career home runs and 892 RBI. He was traded to the San Francisco Giants for Denard Span and a crop of prospects. Span hit a clutch 3-run RBI triple to cap off a 6-run eighth inning, leading the Rays to a 6-4, come from behind, Opening Day win.

The Rays also shed a lot of their power by trading Corey Dickerson to Pittsburgh and letting Logan Morrison and Lucas Duda walk in free agency. They will once again look to rely on pitching and defense. The Rays lost three straight games against the Red Sox despite holding them to three runs or less each game.

Longoria, meanwhile, went hitless in his first series with the Giants. But that hardly makes the trade a big victory for Tampa Bay.

Red Sox-Rays Is An Underrated Rivalry

The Rays began in 1998 but it seemed like it didn’t take long for the franchise to choose Boston as their rival.

The two teams were initially linked when legendary third baseman Wade Boggs christened the franchise’s arrival to MLB in 1998 and capped his Hall of Fame career with a home run as his 3,000 career hit in 1999. He wears a Red Sox cap in his HOF plaque but originally wanted a Rays cap.

The battles truly began in 2000, when Pedro Martinez beaned Gerald Williams and started a brawl. The Rays were in the midst of their first winning season in 2008 and established themselves as a legit contender in a fight that had Red Sox outfielder Coco Crisp dodge a punch thrown by Rays pitcher James Shields like he was in the Matrix. Their most recent scuffle came in 2014, when David Price was still the Tampa Bay ace. Price joined the Red Sox in 2016 and patched things up with David Ortiz.

The Rays and Red Sox will face off at the Boston home opener in Fenway Park this afternoon.

 

2018 Red Sox: Best and Worst Case Scenarios

Opening Day has finally come, so it’s time to stop speculating on what may or may not happen in the 2018 MLB season. Before we do so however, I wanted to touch on what a best case or worst case scenario looks like for the 2018 Boston Red Sox. There is definitely a wide range of outcomes with this club. While I think they’ll be on the higher end of them, you never know. Let’s take a look at how things would play out perfectly, or disastrously.

The Best Case Scenario for the 2018 Red Sox

All of the success and good vibes from spring training carry over into April and the teamRed Sox 2018 Best and Worst keeps riding that wave. Chris Sale, David Price and Rick Porcello form a three-head monster at the top of the rotation and the only problem is that they’ll probably all split votes in the Cy Young Award race. Drew Pomeranz and Eduardo Rodriguez come back from the DL and remain healthy while finally realizing their immense potentials and solidifying the back of the pitching staff. The team releases Steven Wright.

Craig Kimbrel pitches like he did in 2017 while Tyler Thornburg and Carson Smith are healthy, super setup men. The rest of the bullpen falls in line and with all of the rest they get due to great performances by the starters, they excel.

JD Martinez provides the power the Sox have been missing. Mookie Betts gets back to an MVP-caliber player. Andrew Benintendi and Rafael Devers continue to thrive despite their inexperience. Dustin Pedroia turns back the clock to when he was actually good. JBJ and Christian Vazquez make strides at the plate to compliment their defense and Xander Bogaerts bounces back to re-join the “best shortstop in the league” conversation. The TB12 Method works wonders for Hanley Ramirez as he has his best season in Boston.

The bench guys play like starters and form one of the best units in the league to give the Sox amazing depth. Mitch Moreland and Eduardo Nunez get back to how they were when they were healthy for Boston in 2017. Blake Swihart’s wild journey ends well as he becomes a valuable utility player and Brock Holt gets back to being an “All Star”. Alex Cora wins manager of the year after he changes the culture in the Sox clubhouse and on the field. The Sox run away with the AL East over the Yankees. They then get through Houston and New York before facing Washington in the World Series. Devers comes up with big blasts to win World Series MVP as Boston takes home the title in 6 games.

Worst Case Scenario

The Sox groove from spring training is cut off and they start the season slow. Chris Sale and David Price either get hurt or stink. The fans start to lose it. Porcello continues to serve up long balls while Pomeranz and Rodriguez can’t stay healthy. The rotation ends up looking like a Triple A squad. The bullpen implodes every time they actually get a lead.

Pressure mounts as the leadership and clubhouse issues persist. Dustin Pedroia still feuds with the media and refuses to do anything but ground out to second base. Xander Bogaerts can’t seem to find his swing and is dangled in trade talks. Benintendi and Devers growing pains become real issues and we wonder whether they will actually pan out like we’d hoped. JBJ can’t hit a breaking pitch and Christian Vazquez becomes an automatic out. Mookie Betts cracks under the pressure of being a leader and an All Star while a divide forms between him and the front office. JD Martinez turns into David Price 2.0 in that he just can’t hack it in Boston and starts lashing out. Hanley Ramirez goes fully in the tank and his attitude gets him shipped out of town for pennies on the dollar.

The bench becomes a total hole as Blake Swihart’s value dips and we figure out that Brock Holt has overstayed his welcome. Nunez does not stay healthy and soon the team is made up of minor leaguers trying to fill in the gaps.

As the summer goes on, we find out that Cora wasn’t ready to be a manager at all. He gets into bad habits and stays stubborn about them with anyone who questions him. The team misses the postseason despite all the talent and the big payroll. The looming offseason is full of uncertainty.

Back to Reality

In truth, it’s not likely either of these things happen. The Sox won’t be perfect all year on their way to a championship. They won’t totally go down the tubes either. Well, at least I hope not. They’ll likely be an improved club that wins ballgames but still has some glaring issues. I like them to ultimately be the last squad standing, but it won’t be without some hiccups along the way. Manage your expectations, Sox fans and enjoy the season. We’re finally ready for the real thing!