Yankee Fan Reacts To JBJ’s Catch With Bigotry

The Boston Red Sox played host to their arch-rival the New York Yankees this past weekend. The rivals split the four-game series 2-2 with the Red Sox still a few gamesYankee fan ahead of the Yankees. The series saw many highs and lows, including a blown save by Craig Kimbrel. The biggest highlight of the series though came during the fourth and final game Sunday night. In the top of the eighth, centerfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. robbed a home run from the Yankees’ Aaron Judge. While both Red Sox and Yankee fans behaved well in general during the series, one Yankee fan took to Instagram to voice his reaction to Bradley Jr.’s amazing catch. He wasn’t exactly subtle in his opinion about Bradley Jr., and it was caught by a Red Sox fan for all on Instagram to see.

Following the game, a Red Sox fan and Instagram user posted a snapshot to his storyline. The snapshot detailed a conversation between two Instagramers, one a Red Sox fan and another a Yankee fan. The Yankee-themed Instagram account has 12,000 followers while Red Sox-themed account has about 2300 followers. While the message in its entirety wasn’t available to read, the Red Sox fan mentioned how Jackie Bradley Jr. robbed Aaron Judge of a home run. In response, the Yankee fan wrote “Lucky catch from that n–ger coon.” The Red Sox fan screenshot the conversation with the tagline, “reeeeeal classy…trash Red Sox fans and then call JBJ that…” and posted it as an Instagram story. I reached out to both users for comment but neither responded. You can see the actual snapshot here.

Many of you who are reading this might wonder why I’m taking issue with this message. Some of you might shrug it off. Others might argue that it’s not worth talking about. Some might even say it’s stupid. But here’s why I think this is an important story to discuss.

Not Everyone Is Like This Yankee Fan, But They Exist Everywhere

Last April, the Baltimore Orioles’ Adam Jones found himself on the receiving end of racial taunts at Fenway Park. While most Red Sox fans reacted with anger and disgust, others carried on as if it was nothing. Some even said Jones needs to get over himself. But it’s that very attitude that enables this kind of behavior to begin with. People complain and say things like “I’m tired of everyone being so sensitive!” Others will say that they’re tired of these kinds of stories, racism will exist no matter what, free speech, etc. But here’s something people forget about. That’s a two way street.

Now, people are entitled to their beliefs, but keep in mind that others are entitled to respond. If someone isn’t ready to defend themselves without using racial slurs, then maybe he or she should just keep to themselves. More importantly, maybe they shouldn’t share their thoughts on social media.

Hey Yankee Fan, What You Post On Social Media Stays There Forever

It’s sad and pathetic that baseball has to suffer these fools who think it’s okay to bring their racist sentiments to the ballpark, or post them on social media. It’s as if they don’t notice the number 42 that hangs in every MLB ballpark. Jackie Robinson is the main reason why baseball could integrate in the first place. The amount of taunting he endured in his career led to his early death at 53. He sacrificed himself so others like him could play the great game. But here we are, seventy years later, and not only do we still have to listen to people throw the “n” word around, but even worse, we have to listen to them complain when someone calls them out on their bigotry. Again, two way street here.

Can’t We All Just Get Along?

Of course, not every Yankee fan shares these bigoted views. All of the Yankee fans I know don’t care what color skin someone is as long as they can play ball. But regardless of how you feel about this topic, I think we can all agree that it’s totally not okay to use racial slurs to describe someone like Jackie Bradley Jr.

This isn’t about being politically correct. This isn’t about being sensitive. And it’s not even about trying to pick a petty fight. It’s about calling fans out on their racism, whether it’s at the ballpark or on social media. Of course, there’s some issues that we can hotly debate all day long, like whether to play “God Bless America” at ballgames. Those are heathy debates where both sides can make valid points. But how do you defend someone who wrote those comments about Jackie Bradley Jr.? You can argue that Bradley Jr. isn’t deserving of a Gold Glove (although that’s hard to argue). You can argue that Bradley should spend more time on his hitting (true). But who in their right mind is going to argue that it’s okay for a Yankee fan to call him a “n–ger coon?” Yes, I could ignore it, but that’s hard to do when it’s posted to Instagram.

It’s About Defending One Of Our Own

I have no doubt that some of my readers are going to slam me for bringing this up. But before they do so, ask yourself a question. Am I angry about this blog post, or am I more angry about what some Yankee fan said about our centerfielder and how he said it? Who are you going to defend? A bigoted Yankee Fan? Or Jackie Bradley Jr.?

I leave you with a quote from a great Boston-themed movie The Boondock Saints, “Now, we must all fear evil men. But, there is another kind of evil which we must fear most … and that is the indifference of good men!”

Don’t be indifferent to this reality.

Red Sox Nation Loves To Hate John Farrell

Look at any comment thread beneath a Red Sox article and you can see how fans love to hate John Farrell. They call for his ouster when the Red Sox are losing. They demand his head when they lose badly. Red Sox Nation is even lukewarm towards him when the Red Sox are winning. So why all the hate?

I’ll admit I’m one of those writers who has gone back and forth on Farrell. Some days I’llhate john farrell defended his honor. There’s no doubt Red Sox Nation gets worked up sometimes and says irrational things. Then there’s other days when I read about low morale in the Red Sox clubhouse and assume Farrell’s the source. But is Farrell a consistent manager or do fans and writers just love to hate him?

Bill “Spaceman” Lee once shared his opinion about fickle Boston fans. The pilgrims came here from England and decided to settle in this area where it gets bitter cold in the winter and the snow is often brutal. Facing this hard weather year and year has turned Bostonians into a moody brood who love to hate, and hate to love. So is Farrell a victim of this New England attitude or is he really that bad at managing?

Do Fans Hate John Farrell Or Just Every Red Sox Manager?

Farrell led the Red Sox to a World Series win in 2013, followed by two last-place seasons in 2014 and 2015. The Red Sox won a playoff spot last year but it was more of a limp into the post-season than a sprint. But was that Farrell’s fault? It’s no secret that injuries plague the Red Sox, especially their pitching staff. Farrell did, however, make some questionable decisions last year when he continued to insert Clay Buchholz after it was clear he didn’t have what it took to win ballgames. Then there’s his questionable use of inexperienced pinch hitters.

So do fans love to hate John Farrell? Well, I’ll admit that this writer does. He’s an easy target the same way a teacher is for students when they get poor grades. Is it because he or she is a bad teacher, or is it because the students didn’t study hard enough? You don’t have to look far to find Red Sox players who don’t hustle as much as they should (cough cough Pablo Sandoval). So is that Farrell’s fault? No.

But should Farrell do more to motivate his players? Yes. If not, it’ll eventually cost him his job.

The Pablo Sandoval Nightmare Is Over

The Boston Red Sox designated Pablo Sandoval for assignment on Friday, July 14th, marking the end to a long and dismal performance by the third baseman. This move means the Red Sox will have to swallow the remaining $49 million left on Sandoval’s contract. That $49 million will be the second largest dead contract in MLB history, behind Josh Hamilton. While this is bad news for Dave Dombrowski, it’s music to thepablo sandoval nightmare ears of Red Sox Nation. The Long Pablo Sandoval nightmare is finally over.

Many wondered if the five-year, $95 million contract the Red Sox offered Sandoval was too excessive. He played well in San Francisco, helping the Giants win multiple World Series titles. After a dismal 2015 debut season though the Red Sox started having second thoughts. His .245 with 10 home runs and 47 RBI in 2015 concerned many. Starting the 2016 season with a .000 batting average in three games, followed by season-ending surgery, concerned everyone. It wasn’t just Sandoval’s poor performance at the plate though.

The Sandoval Nightmare Was Self-Created

Posting to Instagram during a June 2015 game caught him the ire of management and the front office. Reporting to spring training in 2016 overweight made him the subject of ridicule. What little respect he still had going into the 2016 season quickly evaporated when his belt buckle exploded during a game in Toronto. Sandoval soon went on the DL for the remainder of the season. While a much slimmer Sandoval returned for the 2017 season, injuries and apathy soon got the better of him. Finally, on July 14th, the Red Sox ditched Sandoval after hitting .212 with four home runs and 12 RBI in 32 games.

Sandoval was a problem for many reasons. He clearly didn’t like it here in Boston. His effort was mediocre at best. His tepid focus and dedication hurt the team. But despite the huge amount of money the Red Sox still owe him, some fans think it’s worth getting rid of him.

I certainly do.

Ballparks Must Stop Playing “God Bless America”

There’s two songs that everyone expects to hear when they go to a ballgame. The first, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” sets the tone of the game. Then there’s “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” played during the seventh inning stretch. These two songs are staples of the great game of baseball. Ballparks must stop playing “God Bless America” during the seventh inning stretch. Its purpose went stagnant years ago.

There’s a few reasons why ballparks must stop playing “God Bless America” at ballgames.Ballparks Must Stop First, it’s too redundant. Now I love being an American. I’m thankful to God that I was born an American. But how many times do I have to stand up and pledge my allegiance? Whose approval do I need? And why of all places should it be at a ballpark? With politics dividing our nation in a way that hasn’t been seen since the Civil War, the last thing we need is a song that puts people on the spot if they don’t stand up and place their hands over their hearts in the seventh inning (I stopped doing it months ago). I’m not at a ballgame to prove that I love my country. In fact, I don’t have to prove anything to anyone. That’s what makes America great. We have the freedom to express ourselves anyway we see fit as long as we’re not infringing on the rights of others. You love “God Bless America”? Hey, great! It’s your right. But don’t tell me that I have to love it too.

The Man Who Wrote The Song Didn’t Even Like It

Irving Berlin wrote the song in 1918 and thought it too depressing, so he shoved it in a drawer for 20 years. He dusted it off when World War II broke out and the rest is history. To clarify, Berlin didn’t think the song sufficied so he put it away. Berlin released it only when a radio show host asked him for a song about America she could play on her show.

Sixty years later, baseball parks appropriately started playing “God Bless America” in the wake of the 9/11 attacks in 2001. It was a song many Americans sang in unity. It comforted Americans during a very dark time in our nation’s history. But now it’s a stagnant remnant and feels too much like an obnoxious “in your face” attempt to prove one’s patriotism. Gersh Huntsman of The New York Daily News stated, “The song still embodies great things about America, but also our worst things: self-righteousness, forced piety, earnest self-reverence, foam.”

I couldn’t agree more.

The song feels so much like a third wheel on a date. You don’t really want it there but you don’t want to be mean and ignore it. It doesn’t have to be there to begin with. And what you had to start was good enough. I’m talking about you and “The Star Spangled-Banner.” I feel proud to stand up and remove my hat for our National Anthem. I even get angry when I hear fans talking during the song at Fenway. “The Star-Spangled Banner” has a very significant meaning to Fenway Park. In fact, the tradition of playing the National Anthem started at Fenway Park. 

The Star-Spangled Banner Suffices

If you’re a Red Sox season ticket holder like me, then you’ve heard “The Star-Spangled Banner” hundreds of times. Not only does it mark the time when fans rise to show respect for the colors and appreciation for America, but it marks the beginning of the game! So why do we need “God Bless America”?

Let’s take a look at a few numbers while we contemplate the answer. Sheryl Kaskowitz’s 2013 book, God Bless America: The Surprising History of an Iconic Song, states that about 61% of baseball fans would like to see the song removed. Her research also found that 83.8% of “very liberal” people dislike the song, while 20.5% of “very conservative” people” have a problem with it. This statistics highlight the divide and potential for causing conflicts at ballgame.

Going back to my original point, many people see the song as a litmus test for one’s patriotism. Fans who see others not standing for the song in the seventh inning might feel obligated to jeer them. “Why don’t you stand for God Bless America, huh? What are you not American?” Again, no one needs to prove anything to anyone at a ballgame except for your love for the home team. People go to ballgames to get away from politics, religion, work, etc. The last thing anyone needs is a drunken fan looking for an excuse to fight. The Yankees are coming to town this week so we’ll have enough reasons to fight as it is. We don’t need any more reasons.

Ballparks Must Stop Playing “God Bless America”

Now, I’m not for removing any and all things that offend people. Lord knows I love eating hot dogs in front of the PETA protestors in Harvard Square. That’s not what I’m getting at though. Instead, what I’m trying to say is that not only does the song contribute to the divided of the nation because it obligates citizens to unnecessarily prove their patriotism, but it’s unnecessary to begin with. It’s a song that’s overstayed its welcome. Fenway Park plays the National Anthem, “Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” and “Sweet Caroline.” The first two songs are as American as apple pie. So ballparks must stop forcing “God Bless America” down baseball fans’ throats. The first two are more than perfect.

Ballparks must stop playing “God Bless America.” Baseball already has two songs soaked in tradition that people on both sides of the political divide love. So let’s remove that third wheel. Sit back, sing the National Anthem and “Take Me Out to the Ballgame,” and enjoy the game.

Red Sox Fans Really Like Craig Kimbrel

Craig Kimbrel is having a truly dominant season for the Red Sox. In just his second year Craig Kimbrelwith Boston he has posted a 1.23 ERA to go with just 5 earned-runs all season. He also has a league-leading 23 saves already. What exactly is it that makes Kimbrel so unhittable? Is it the pre-pitch death-stare? The blazing fastball that blows guys away? Or is it the absolutely filthy knuckle-curve that he spins with 2-strikes to make professional-hitters look totally foolish? “Gas Masterson” can strike you out in a multitude of ways. If you can find a way to not strike out, that still does not mean you’re getting on base. The 6-time MLB All-Star has done nothing but great things for the Sox since he joined the squad, and looks to continue that trend in the second half.

Craig Kimbrel Is Not Slowing Down

The only way Craig Kimbrel is going to stop getting hitters out is if John Farrell doesn’t bring him in. The guy is a stud; simple as that. Hitters just do not want to see Kimbrell jogging in from the Red Sox bullpen in the ninth. Kimbrel’s blazing fastball is consistently pumping 99 mph, while his knuckle-curve could be considered “disgusting” by opposing hitters. He’s in the prime of his career at 29 years-old and is hungry for a World Series title. Kimbrel wants the ball in the last-inning of Game 7, and he wants to shut the door. Sure, he might find a way to make it interesting. When it’s over, we’ll all think back and say “Man, I knew he had it the whole time!” just like every time before.

How To Retain Craig Kimbrel

Though Red Sox fans do not have to worry about it quite yet, Craig Kimbrel’s contract does expire at the end of the 2018 season. He will become an unrestricted free-agent after making $13,000,000 that season. To retain Kimbrel, Boston will have to prove to him that their organization is where he belongs. Also, they will need to assure him that the deal he is offered from the Red Sox (assuming they do make him an offer) is the best one available to him. Keeping Craig Kimbrel on a long-term deal is something the Red Sox should definitely look at if they plan to compete four or five years from now.

The Red Sox Owe Jim Rice More Respect

Jim Rice played his entire career with the Boston Red Sox from 1974 to 1989. He was an 8-time All-Star and American League MVP in 1978. After years of waiting, Rice finally received induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2009 in his final year of eligibility. Some argue that Rice isn’t a Hall of Famer because his numbers fall just below the unofficial standard. Others argue Rice’s induction took too long and his numbers prove his worth. Regardless of what you might think, the Red Sox owe Jim Rice more respect, especially after retiring so many other numbers in the last three years.

The Red Sox used to have three rules to retire a number. 1) Play ten years with the RedRed Sox Owe Jim Rice Sox. 2) Retire as a Red Sox player. 3) Be in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Jim Rice is one of the few players who actually fulfilled all three requirements. In fact, he was the last to fulfill all those requirements. Since then they’ve retired Pedro Martinez, Wade Boggs, and David Ortiz’s jersey numbers. None of those three players fulfilled the requirements.

I’m not saying that there’s a retired number that doesn’t belong up there. But why did Jim Rice have to wait so long while other players got ushered to the front of the line? Few other players hustled harder than Rice did. It’s easy to look at his numbers and say that they’re good but not great. But it’s impossible to quantify Rice’s contributions to the game. He helped lead the Red Sox to the World Series in 1975 (an injury kept him out of play) and also in 1986. Additionally, Rice is one of only two players to lead the American League in both triples and home runs in one season. On top of that, he is still the only player who has ever led the majors in triples, home runs and RBIs in the same season.

Red Sox Owe Jim Rice An Apology

The fact that Jim Rice waited so long to see his number retired while others didn’t is becoming the white elephant in the room. While you can argue that players like Ted Williams and Joe Cronin waited too, the Red Sox didn’t actually start retiring numbers until 1984, and their numbers were among the first to get retired.

Jim Rice paid his dues. He waited patiently not only to see his number retired, but to get inducted into the Hall of Fame. The Red Sox insulted the man by making him jump hoops. They took those hoops away though from Pedro Martinez, Wade Boggs, and David Ortiz. Boggs jumped ship to the Evil Empire. He even had the nerve to wear his Yankee World Series ring to his ceremony!

Red Sox Owe Jim Rice A Statue Too

At the very least, the Red Sox could erect a statue for Jim Rice. Or they could name something in Fenway after him. No matter what, the Red Sox owe Jim Rice something to make up for the way they shafted him. He stayed loyal to Boston when he could have left for more money.