Retired Red Sox Who Should Be in Cooperstown

Baseball fans from all walks of life love to debate which of their favorite non-Hall of Fame players should be enshrined in Cooperstown. Dodger fans want to see Gil Hodges and Maury Wills inducted. Mets fans want to see Davey Johnson in the Hall of Fame. Fans of the Negro Leagues want Buck O’Neil inducted for his contributions to baseball. But which  retired Red Sox players should be inducted in the Hall of Fame who haven’t made it in yet? Let’s take a look at the top three who the BBWAA voters have slighted over the years.

Retired Red Sox Star Pitcher Luis Tiant

There’s probably no one more deserving to be in the Hall of Fame than Luis Tiant. He wonretired red sox 229 games throughout his career. In his 1964 Major League debut against the New York Yankees, Tiant allowed only four hits (all singles). He also struck out eleven in the 3-0 debut shutout. Overall, he was a three-time All-Star and two-time ERA leader with 49 career shutouts. But his masterful performance in the 1975 World Series is what Red Sox fans remember him best for going 2-0, one of which was a shutout against the Reds. His numbers are better than many Hall of Fame pitchers and for that he should be a Hall of Famer.

Red Red Sox Star Outfielder Dwight Evans

His omission from Cooperstown is one of the more glaring mistakes the BBWAA has made in the last thirty years. Evans was a three-time All-Star, an eight-time Gold Glove winner, and a two-time Silver Slugger Award winner during his twenty-year career. He also accumulated over 2400 hits and slugged 385 home runs. His defense alone should have gotten serious consideration. The fact that was an offensive powerhouse too is why fans feel his absence in Cooperstown.

Retired Red Sox Star Infielder Johnny Pesky

I’ll admit that arguing that Pesky should be inducted is a little tougher than Tiant and Evans’ calls for induction. Pesky only played between 1942-1954. Pesky served three of those years in the military during World War II. He barely had any power either; he only hit 17 home runs in his career. But he accumulated 620 hits in his first three seasons in the Majors with 205, 208, and 207 hits, respectively. He coached some of the greatest Red Sox players in history, including Carl Yastrzemski, Jim Rice, Fred Lynn, and Johnny Damon. His hitting, coaching abilities, and legendary status in Boston, while not the strongest case for induction, make it hard to ignore him.

Red Sox Outfielder Fred Lynn

Lynn didn’t play for the Red Sox for his entire career. He did, however, achieve some of his best numbers while in Boston. Lynn won both the MVP, Rookie of the Year Awards in 1975, while also collecting a Gold Glove and making an All-Star appearance. Overall, he was a nine-time All-Star who hit 306 home runs during his seventeen-year career. While his numbers don’t quite rival those in the Hall of Fame, his rookie year accomplishments alone should have gotten him more consideration.

Mookie Betts and J.D. Martinez: The New Bash Brothers

Mookie Betts and J.D. Martinez are leading the American League in home runs with fifteen each as of May 20th. Betts is a serious 2018 MVP candidate. Martinez is proving to be worth every penny of his $110 million salary so far this season. The way Betts and Martinez are hitting home runs reminds older fans of another hitting duo of the 1980s: the Oakland A’s Jose Canseco and Mark McGwire. Their home run totals led the media to dub them the Bash Brothers. Now, thirty years later and 3,108 miles to the east, Betts and Martinez are emerging as the new bash brothers.

The New Bash Brothers Are Following the Original Duo

Red Sox fans can take stock in this title, especially if they look at the parallels between thenew bash brothers A’s of the 1980s and Red Sox of today. Canseco and McGwire hit over 200 home runs combined between 1988 and 1990. Canseco was named American League Most Valuable Player in 1988 after hitting .307 and 42 home runs with 124 RBIs. He also became the first major leaguer to hit 40 home runs and steal 40 bases in a season. Meanwhile, McGwire hit 49, 32, 33, and 39 home runs in his first four full seasons in the Majors between 1987 and 1990. Canseco and McGwire also led the A’s to a World Series championship in 1989. The parallels between the original Bash Brothers and Betts and Martinez are hard to miss.

The New Bash Brothers Are Just Beginning

While Betts and Martinez have been around for a few seasons now, uniting in Boston is giving the Boston faithful a lot to be hopeful about. Like McGwire before him, Martinez is on pace for a 50+ home run season. Like Canseco before him, Betts is a leading candidate for the MVP award. If history is any indicator of how this season will end for the Red Sox, then fans can certainly look forward to seeing Boston in the post-season.

Tyler Thornburg’s Return Can’t Come Soon Enough

In December of 2016, the Boston Red Sox acquired relief pitcher Tyler Thornburg from the Milwaukee Brewers in exchange for Travis Shaw and two additional prospects. If that name doesn’t grab your attention, you’re probably not alone. Thornburg has not thrown a single pitch in a Red Sox uniform.

Thornburg was shut down in February of 2017 with shoulder soreness. It was not until Tyler Thornburg June of that year when he underwent surgery to treat thoracic outlet syndrome in his throwing shoulder. Former manager John Farrell maintained his belief that surgery was not necessary, resulting in the delayed operation. It also resulted in Boston’s promising new setup man missing the entire 2017 season, and the start of this one.

It is no secret that the Red Sox bullpen has struggled this season. And this should come as no surprise. Relief pitching was among the most pressing needs of this team in the offseason. Dave Dombrowski decided to spend his money on Boston’s other need, signing J.D. Martinez and filling the void of a power bat left vacant by David Ortiz. While that signing has paid off, and then some, it does not change the fact that the bullpen needs help.

And just recently, the bullpen woes worsened. Setup man Carson Smith, who has pitched as well as any of Boston’s relievers, found his way onto 10-day disabled list earlier this week. After throwing his glove in frustration during a 6-5 loss to the Oakland Athletics, Smith injured his shoulder and is expected to miss an extended period of time. Dubbed a subluxation by Red Sox officials, this injury puts even more pressure on the already depleted Boston bullpen. In 2006, closer Jonathan Papelbon suffered an injury similar in nature, and ended up missing the rest of the season.

Get to Know Tyler Thornburg

That’s where Tyler Thornburg comes into play. In his last active season, Thornburg went 8-5 in 67 appearances out of the Brewers’ bullpen. He ended the year with a career-best 2.15 ERA and 90 strikeouts. Joining Craig Kimbrel and Chris Sale as the new arms in Beantown, Thornburg was expected to become a trustworthy setup man for Kimbrel.

Thornburg is making strides and Dombrowski said he is “very close to coming back” in a press conference on Tuesday. In his last outing with Triple-A Pawtucket on Wednesday, he allowed a home run, a walk, and 2 earned runs on only 19 pitches before exiting. These struggles delayed his next start until Friday, but he says he feels fine health-wise.

The services of this talented relief pitcher have been dearly missed by the Red Sox, and are now needed more than ever.

I’m Losing My Patience With David Price

On December 7, 2015, the Boston Red Sox inked David Price to a seven-year, $217 million dollar contract. And Red Sox Nation rejoiced, myself included. Was it justified? Of course it was. Price, a 3-time All-Star, and 2012 Cy Young Award recipient was one of the best starting pitchers on the free agent market at the time. Zack Greinke was the other, and recently hired general manager Dave Dombrowski had his sights set on bringing an ace to his new ballclub.

He did just that. Boston’s new GM, notorious for flashy transactions, signed the 29-year-David Priceold southpaw to the most lucrative deal for a starting pitcher in MLB history. David Price’s extravagant contract, with a $31 million annual salary, was also the largest deal in franchise history and seemed to fill Boston’s vacancy at Ace for years to come.

At the time, rolling out the Brinks truck for Price made sense. A lot of sense. The Sox were on the heels of two straight last-place finishes in the AL East, and the recent acquisitions of Dombrowski and closer Craig Kimbrel marked a new era of baseball in Beantown.

Now fast forward three years. Price, now 32 and in the third year of his contract, missed his last start after getting diagnosed with what the team called “a mild case of carpal tunnel syndrome”. It wasn’t just any start though. It was game two in a road series against the Yankees with the division lead, and the MLB’s best record, at stake. And it wasn’t just any diagnosis either. There is significant speculation that it may be related to excessive time spent playing video games, namely Fortnite.

Price has since said that the setback is unrelated to his gaming habits and that he will stop playing Fortnite in the clubhouse. Manager Alex Cora showed his support by downplaying the notion as well, and they are likely correct from a medical standpoint. However, the speculation alone is frustrating enough. Video games should not be in conversations about $217 million dollar pitchers missing starts against division rivals.

David Price is a Repeat Offender

Now, if this was the first or even second blemish on Price’s tenure, it would be a different story. But that is far from the case. The tingling sensation in Price’s hands, which led to his recent diagnosis, also forced him out of a game in April. Which, coincidence or not, was also against the New York Yankees.

And we all know about his conflict with Red Sox broadcaster Dennis Eckersley last season, where he cursed at the Hall of Fame pitcher and refused to apologize in the aftermath. Price went on to go 6-3 with a 3.38 ERA in 2017 and finished the season in a relief role. He has started 2018 with a 2-4 record and a 5.11 ERA in seven starts. He threw a limited bullpen on Thursday after missing Wednesday’s start. Cora is hopeful that Price will be ready for his next scheduled start on Saturday against the Toronto Blue Jays.

David Price keeps finding ways to make headlines, but not for the right reasons. Frustration is growing towards Boston’s controversial pitcher, and patience is shrinking. It’s time for Price to start making headlines on the field and regain the form that the Red Sox paid $217 million dollars for.

 

Red Sox Offense Continues to Flourish

You can wave goodbye to the narrative that the Red Sox’ unheralded start to theRed Sox Offense season is a result of poor competition. After opening the season with nine games against the Rays and Marlins, they took two of three from the Yankees. Then they swept the Orioles. Then they took their high-powered offense across the country and swept the Los Angeles Angels. The Red Sox offense picked up right where they left off against their counterpart atop the American League standings, outscoring the Halos 27-3 in the series. Boston has won 7 straight and their 16-2 record is the MLB’s best start since 1987.

The brilliance of Boston’s offense has been no secret this season. They entered the series on a 4-game win streak with a top-two offense in Major League Baseball. The Angels boasted the league’s top offense as of Monday. Just days later, the Red Sox now own the best offense, and best record, in the nation.

Red Sox Offense: The Ohtani Test

In the series opener, the Red Sox got their first look at rookie phenom Shohei Ohtani. Ohtani has taken the MLB by storm with his dynamic two-way talent and jumped out to a 2-0 start with only four hits allowed. Boston’s juggernaut of an offense had other plans.

The Red Sox matched Ohtani’s hit total for the season in just two innings. The first came a mere seven pitches into the game when Mookie Betts sent one of his praised fastballs 411 feet over the center field wall. Ohtani’s night ended after just two innings, but Boston’s offense was just getting started. Betts added two more solo shots, tying Ted Williams’ franchise record for most career games with three home runs (3). Rafael Devers, Brock Holt, and Jackie Bradley Jr. all went deep as well. The Sox, totaling 15 hits in this offensive showcase, cruised to a 10-1 victory in the series opener.

Consistent Offense

In game two, the best offense in the MLB picked up right where they left off. Home runs from J.D. Martinez and Mitch Moreland, and a grand slam from Rafael Devers paced the Red Sox in their 9-0 win. In game three, Mookie Betts hit his second leadoff home run of the series, only needing three pitches this time. Andrew Benintendi, who sat out game two, added a home run and 3 RBI to the team’s 8-2 win.

With their latest sweep, the Red Sox extend their win streak to seven games as their offense looks more dangerous by the day. In 18 games, Boston has scored 6 or more runs in 11 of them, and average a league-best 6.35 runs per game. They lead the MLB in hits (190), batting average (.292), on-base percentage (.362), slugging percentage (.496), runs (116), and extra-base hits (82). After not hitting a single grand slam in 2017, they already have four this year. Able to produce with contact or power, this dynamic offense is the real deal, and here to stay.

It Gets Better

Let us not forget about Xander Bogaerts and Dustin Pedroia, both sidelined due to injury. Bogaerts was proving to be a valuable cog in this offense, batting .368 before hurting his ankle. Pedroia hasn’t seen the field yet, but his value to this lineup is undeniable.

Bogaerts took batting practice on Tuesday and is expected to return sometime next week. Pedroia is still a couple weeks away from returning, nursing his knee after receiving surgery over the summer.

Clearly, these absences have not impacted Boston’s bats in the slightest. But with two important starters set to return over the next few weeks, Red Sox Nation has every reason to be excited about this commanding offense.

Pedro Martinez Hosts Charity Event

Former Boston Red Sox ace and World Series champion Pedro Martinez headlined thePedro Martinez “Rally for 45 fundraisers”, speaking about he and wife, Carolina’s, charity the ‘Pedro Martinez Foundation’. The fundraiser was held at ‘Hurricanes’ bar in Boston, on Sunday, April 15th. All proceeds raised during the event will go towards Pedro’s charity.

The charity benefits children in the Dominican Republic, Pedro’s native country, by providing them with food, getting an education, job training and more. Pedro came to Boston, his “second home”, to speak to the media about his charity, before the Boston Marathon. A tradition Martinez and Carolina hold near to their heart.

“Well, you know, Boston to me is my second home,” said Martinez. “I’m trying to raise money with everything Boston does. The marathon is no exception. I was a runner myself when I was a player. I was a big fan of running. The Boston Marathon is part of the tradition and the culture in Boston.

‘Hurricanes’ had memorabilia at the event that was auctioned off. Notable memorabilia consisted of a signed Lionel Messi jersey, a framed autographed portrait of both Magic Johnson and Larry Bird, a “Boston’s Best” autographed photo of both Tom Brady and David Ortiz and much more.

Pedro Martinez Talks Charity and Baseball

Martinez spoke adamantly of how much Carolina has helped with the charity.

“The biggest reason why we have these kids do well in society, is because of her,” Martinez said. “She is the heart and soul with what we have done. She’s the one that’s always in the middle of it. Its like when you go into a fight in baseball, she’s the catcher. The one who has your back. the one that holds the guy low, so that he doesn’t hit you. That’s my wife.

Pedro spoke on what it’s like working with the kids involved in his charity.

“That’s our reward (on charity work)”, said Pedro. “To see these kids develop into better human beings, better men, better women in society, this is really why you make the effort to go the extra mile. You see them develop and become professionals.”

Martinez Thoughts on Red Sox

“I was glad to see the little fire between the two teams (Red Sox and Yankees), said Martinez. “It brings back memories of my time when I was playing in Boston. It was good to see us stand up in front of the Yankees and actually compete with them the same time.

Pedro seems encouraged with how the Red Sox have done under new manager Alex Cora.

“I’m extremely excited about the team has started. Between working early on in spring training, with all those guys. And to keep them healthy. That has been the biggest reason why we are off to a good start. I think the team has all the tools to compete with any team in the big leagues. And we are confident, if we stay healthy, we are going to be in it with everybody.

To find more information regarding the charity and how to get involved, visit www.pedromartinezcharity.com

Quotes credited to Pedro Martinez foundation “Rally for 45” charity fundraiser