The Season is Slipping Away, and the Red Sox Keep Sinking

Here we are five days into August, and the 2019 season is slipping away. After being swept by both the Rays and Yankees, the Red Sox keep sinking. They are 59-55, and 14.5 games out of first place. Even the chance to get the other Wild Card spot seems crazy at this point as well. Right now, they are six games out of the Wild Card spot.

They currently have lost eight straight games, something that hasn’t happened since theRed Sox Keep 2015 season, two seasons after they won the World Series in 2013. There is something wrong with this team, and fans are not happy about it. From the front office, to the players, something needs to change. We are closing in on the end of the season. One that people are going to want to forget.

The 2019 Season is Slipping Away With No End in Sight

Literally, there seems to be no end in sight for this season. The 2019 season was one that the Red Sox needed to defend in after winning in 2018. From Spring Training until now, the season is slipping away. Before we know it, the book will be closed on 2019, and the players, management and office staff will be on the golf course. It’s a sad reality, but unfortunately it’s true.

As the season slowly comes to a close, the Red Sox have one more series each with AL East opponents, starting with the Orioles. They are 28-31 against AL East opponents, and 31-24 against the other opponents. Practically every game since the start of the season in Seattle has been a struggle for Boston. Yes, starting off on the West Coast can be tough, but this team didn’t change much in the offseason. The only notable absences are that of Craig Kimbrel and Joe Kelly.

Also, unlike the Yankees and Astros, the team hasn’t had a real serious injury. Yes, Dustin Pedroia is out for the season, and players like Nathan Eovaldi and Steve Pearce have been on the injury list. However, the Yankees have played games without Aaron Judge and Giancarlo Stanton, and are 72-39. The Astros have gone without players like Carlos Correa and Jose Altuve, and are 73-40. What’s the Red Sox’s excuse then?

Red Sox Keep Sinking. So When Does Boston Surrender?

Or have they? From the pitching, to the offense, it seems like they have started to surrender the 2019 a while back. It’s a sad reality for a team that has so much talent on it. The one thing that hurt this team the most was the lack of support from the bullpen. So many games were lost due to the inconsistency of the relief pitchers.

It didn’t help that the bats weren’t awake during some of those games as well. For a team that won 108 regular season games last year, this team looks lost. With every loss, especially a close one, the season keeps slipping away.

I’m sure many of them were hoping for some help during the one and only trade deadline, but the front office didn’t make any trades. Now, all we can do is sit, and see what happens next. It has been a tough road for Red Sox Nation as the 2019 season is slipping away.

Coming Up Next For Boston

Rick Porcello gets the ball in game one of the three game set against the Kansas City Royals at Fenway. The Royals, who are 40-73, will be sending Mike Montgomery to the hill on Monday night. One bright spot for the Red Sox is that the Royals are without veteran catcher, Salvador Perez. The 29 year old had Tommy John surgery in March due to a partial tear of the UCL in his right elbow.

After the three game set against the Royals, Mike Trout and the Angels come to Fenway for four games. The Angels are 56-57 coming into Monday. Prior to playing the Red Sox, they will be playing against the Cincinnati Reds for two games at The Great American Ballpark in Cincinnati.

2019 MLB Top Five Catchers

Baseball’s catcher is arguably the most important position while playing the field. Also called “backstop,” catchers are similar to football’s quarterback, by which they are leaders and call the plays. They also suffer more literal welts than any other position, from regular foul tips to the rare bat to the head. The top five catchers in Major League Baseball are threats to the opposing teams both offensively and defensively.

There are just 18 catchers in baseball history that have been elected to the Hall of Fame.top five catchers
Just two of those 18 have played in this millennium: Mike Piazza and Ivan Rodriguez. Kansas City Royals catcher Salvador Perez has started the last five All-Star games for the American League. He is extremely durable. Since taking over as the Royals primary backstop in 2013, he has been healthy enough to play in no less than 129 games. Unfortunately, a UCL injury will sideline Perez this season. He will not make this list.

Top Five Catchers – 5 – Wilson Ramos (New York Mets) & Yasmani Grandal (Milwaukee Brewers)

Ramos began 2018 as Tampa Bay’s starting backstop. He was named as the American League starting catcher in the All-Star Game, only to miss the game with a hamstring injury. Later that month, the Phillies acquired him at the trade deadline. In 33 games with Philadelphia, Ramos went on a mammoth tear, posting a .396 on-base percentage and a .879 OPS. He is clearly one of the best hitting catchers in the game and will now be calling the signals behind home plate in Queens, New York.

Grandal is a consistent premier starting catcher. He differs from Ramos in that he is more durable and a better defender behind the plate. He has at least 426 plate appearances since being becoming a primary catcher in 2014. Grandal has upped his game in the past two seasons at the plate, eclipsing 100-hit, 50 runs and 20-double-plateaus. In the past three seasons, no other catcher has more home runs than Grandal and only Yadier Molina has more RBIs.

4 – Buster Posey (San Francisco Giants)

Before last year, Posey had started three straight All-Star Games for the National League. Posey is a former MVP, three-time World Series champion, and six-time All-Star. With that said, however, he posted his worst slash line as a pro in 2018, with career lows in nearly all major categories. Albeit, he was still named an All-Star. Posey sneaks into the 2019 edition of Top Five Catchers, but another down season could see him ousted by season’s end.

3 – Willson Contreras (Chicago Cubs)

The 26-year-old was a starter for the National League in his first All-Star Game last season. A native of Venezuela, Contreras was signed by Chicago as an international free agent in 2009. He did not blossom quickly, spending seven years in the Cubs farm system. He quickly heated up in the 2015 season for Double-A Tennessee, improving his OPS to .891 from .679 in 2014. Contreras was promoted to Triple-A to begin 2016 and posted a 1.035, which included 43 RBI in 55 games. In June of that year, he was called-up by the Cubs and took over the starting role to begin 2017. In two full seasons, he has hit 31 home runs and knocked in 128 RBI. Contreras is the least established as of the Top Five Catchers, but is viewed as one of Chicago’s most valuable assets and could position himself higher on this list by 2020.

2- Yadier Molina (St. Louis Cardinals)

Molina was the only unanimous lock of the Top Five Catchers. He has been an All-Star in 9 of the past 10 seasons and has won a Gold Glove in 9 of the past 11 years, including one in 2018. He is also a two-time World Series champion. Most impressive is Molina’s durability, playing in at least 110 games in every season during his 14-year career. At age-36, he is on his way towards being elected as the 19th catcher in Cooperstown.

1 – J.T. Realmuto (Philadelphia Phillies)

Realmuto was arguably baseball’s best catcher last season with the Marlins. He was named to his first All-Star Game and led all backstops in hits, runs, doubles, batting average, OPS, and WAR. He was traded to Philadelphia in early February for top pitching prospect Sixto Sanchez, Jorge Alfaro, a once touted catching prospect, another pitching prospect and international pool money. Realmuto’s HR, RBI, and OPS numbers have gone up in each of his four seasons. He is destined to continue that trend in 2019 with help from the best supporting cast he has been partnered with as a pro.