Will the Red Sox Acquire Anyone Today?

We are in the final hours of Major League Baseball’s trade deadline. Will the Boston Red Sox acquire anyone before 4pm? It’s not looking like Dave Dombrowski will make any deals today, at least not yet. But with names like Andrew Benintendi and Christian Vazquez coming up as players the Red Sox might trade, it’s hard to say. Other prospects like Yoan Moncada, Michael Kopech, and Rafael Davers are also trending on Twitter in relation to possible trades. With players like Chris Sale, Carlos Beltran, and Jonathan Lucroy up for grabs, anything is possible!

To see Benintendi traded, one of Boston’s top prospects, would shock the Red Sox Nation, especiallyRed sox acquire when many believe Benintendi is an untouchable prospect. After all, he has an amazing history. Initially drafted by the Cincinatti Reds in the 31st round of the 2013 MLB draft, Benintendi instead enrolled at the University of Arkansas. In 2015, Benentendi led the Southeastern Conference with a .380 batting average and 19 home runs before being named the SEC Player of the Year and winning the Baseball America College Player of the Year Award. He was drafted again in 2015, this time by the Boston Red Sox as a seventh overall draft pick with a $3.6 million bonus. Benintendi debuted with the Lowell Spinners in the Class-A New York-Penn League later that year.

Some believe Andrew Benintendi could be the next Carl Yastrzemski. He’s currently hitting over .300 between stints at Single and Double-A levels. His twelve triples alone signify his developing strength and speed. Between his power, speed, and eye coordination, the Red Sox can’t let an offensive and defensive asset slip away. It’s a little harder to say the same about Christian Vazquez. Vazquez is a good defensive player. But he’s an offensive dud.

If Red Sox Acquire Sale, It Shouldn’t Be For Benentendi, Moncada, or Kopech.

Personally, I think it would be a bad idea to let Andrew Benintendi go. Benintendi’s strengths and potential outweigh any reason to trade him. And as I’ve said before, I strongly doubt that Chris Sale is worth trading Benintendi for. He’s an excellent pitcher, but  he’s totally unstable. Our pitchers need run support, not an addition. The Red Sox currently lead the American League in runners left on base. Instead of worrying about pitching, we should focus on clutch hitting. So with that said, it might make more sense if the Red Sox acquire Lucroy or Beltran. Beltran is a .300 hitter with runners on base, and runners in scoring position. So get them for Vazquez or Blake Swiart (and throw Clay Buchholz in too). We don’t need pitching. We need clutch hitters.

Life and Times of a Sports Journalist: Peter Abraham

Day in and day out sports journalists all over the world are providing fans and media alike with the inside scoop when it comes to our favorite teams. From trades and injuries, to getting that big interview, these men and women are on the front line’s of the professional sports world. I was fortunate enough to be able to chat with 2 of Boston’s best and Sports Journalist Peter Abrahambrightest sports journalists in the game this week— Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe, and Jen McCaffrey of MassLive.com.

A Massachusetts native, Peter Abraham covers the Red Sox. He joined the staff in 2009 after spending nearly 10 years in New York covering the Mets and Yankees for the Journal News.

CW: Growing up in New England and attending U-Mass Amherst, I can imagine you were pretty excited about starting your career at the Boston Globe is 2009. After being at the Journal News for almost 10 years covering the New York Mets and the New York Yankees, what kind of emotions (if any) did you have knowing you were coming back to home to cover the Boston Red Sox?

PA: My biggest emotions were leaving a newspaper that had treated me very well and given me the opportunity of a lifetime to cover baseball. The editors at the Journal News were great mentors. But the Globe was the paper I read growing up and people like Peter Gammons, Bob Ryan, and Will McDonough were why I decided to go into journalism in the first place. I would have regretted not taking the opportunity to work there. In addition, it was an opportunity to work closer to home and see my family so much more often.

CW: How would you describe the differences between your time in New York and here in Boston?

PA: Covering the teams is about the same. The Mets and Yankees beats, in my experience, are more collegial. In Boston, for whatever reason, there’s more media attacking other people in the media. I’m still not sure why that is. The faux indignation on some topics is kind of comical. The other big difference is the demographics; there are 8 million people in New York and a good chunk of them don’t care much about baseball. In Boston, the interest in baseball is much more widespread and pretty much every Red Sox fan is sure they could run the team better than the people who do. It’s great to cover a team so many people care about.

CW: When 9/11 occurred you were covering the New York Mets, and when the Boston Marathon Tragedy occurred you were here covering the Sox. Would you mind speaking about your experiences during both events?

PA: The 9-11 attacks were more of a personal experience for me. Several of my friends lost people in the towers and I covered sporting events in New York afterward, including the Braves-Mets games when Piazza dramatically homered. In the days and weeks that followed, I was switched over to the news department for some assignments in Westchester including speaking to the families of some victims. It was heartbreaking to witness the funerals and other services.The Boston Marathon attacks were odd for me because I was in Cleveland covering the Red Sox for much of what happened in the days afterwards. It was a helpless feeling because I wanted to be home. In the time since, it has been a great privilege to meet people like Jeff Bauman at Fenway Park along with some of the officers who helped bring the Tsarnaev brothers to justice. As somebody who grew up in eastern Massachusetts, it was great to see how the region responded. Covering the 2013 Sox was a memorable time because you saw up close how the team helped the city move forward.

CW: Social Media, everyone is on it. Fans, media, players. Some people have called you snarky or rude when it comes to your interaction with fans on Twitter. I can imagine you get a ton of far-fetched, ridiculous and just overall dumb tweets and emails (I’ve probably tweeted a few, apologies) how do you go about responding to people, especially the Twitter trolls?

PA: I regret my Twitter persona, I’m sarcastic in person, but more in a playful way. On Twitter, it doesn’t translate and I falsely assume people would get I was goofing around. I should just stop looking at notifications. Ideally, it would be a way to get a sense of how fans think. But Twitter has no sense of humor or humanity. It’s a haven for the irrationally angry and easily offended. The other problem is Twitter has done a terrible job of policing abusive users. Women in the media should not be subjected to the trash they receive.

CW: I read one of your blog posts about your first MLB interview with Sox manager, John McNamara. Being rewarded for your hard work and getting to cover that game, did you feel at all discouraged after Johnny Mac told you to “get the $%#& out of my office”? Did that encounter prepare you for future interviews and how you go about talking with managers and players?

PA: I was too young and idealistic to be discouraged. A few writers there also told me what a crank McNamara was and to ignore it. The rest of the day was so great I didn’t let five minutes ruins it.

CW: For anyone wanting to get involved in reporting/sports journalism, what kind of advice would you give?

PA: Be broad-minded. Learn to write and report, develop your voice and contribute to any platform you can. Video, audio, social media, print, etc. Be completely platform-agnostic. Also don’t be afraid to work your way up. I covered thousands of high school, college, and minor league games before I got a big league beat. Don’t expect everything to come your way right away.

Heath Hembree Fan Club

The Heath Hembree Fan Club was born in the wee hours of Monday, April 25 after closer Craig Kimbrel blew hist first save against the Houston Astros. But fear not! For a knight in shining armor appeared and mowed down the Astros hitters for the final 3 innings of a 12-inning circus show. That knight who threw 49 pitches (and only 8 were balls) is RHP Heath Hembree.

At first glance, you may think to yourself “wait…is that John Lackey, I thought we traded him?” Fan ClubOthers have compared him to Kenny Powers from the hit HBO show Eastbound and Down. Personally I think he resembles a John Lackey/Craig Hansen with a splash of Bryce Brentz. Regardless, he’s a guy who the Sox have had to rely on early in his call-up and he has welcomed the challenge with open arms.

Hembree who was one of the pieces acquired from the San Francisco Giants during the summer of 2014 as part of the return for pitcher Jake Peavy, has made three appearances so far this season. In 7 2/3 innings he’s allowed four hits and just one walk to counter his 11 strikes. Over his 3 years with the Sox, Hembree has accumulated a 3.38 ERA while appearing in 30 games. Now I know 30 games over 3 seasons is a very small sample size, but so far in 2016 he’s looking like the real deal.

In a season that has been plagued with injuries so early on and huge pitching woes it’s nice to finally see a pitcher that has not only shown some consistency, but has also been pretty effective. That’s a weapon that John Farrell didn’t have in the beginning of the season and, like they say, sometimes it’s better late than never.

The Heath Hembree fan club will be riding high this week. Twitter will be exploding with Hembree references, jersey sales will be through the roof, and you can bet he’ll be making his way around the late night television circuit. Obviously I am kidding about some of these things, but make no mistake about it: the Red Sox have found what I believe is to be a key piece to this bullpen moving forward. The only question is how long can he keep up this dominance? I’m hoping FOREVER!

Pedroia now has twitter. This should be good.

pedroia

If you’re a Red Sox fan, and you have a twitter account, you should probably add @15lasershow to your following list. I mean, unless you don’t want to follow the hilarity that is Dustin Pedroia.

Pedroia was asked many times if he’d ever join the rest of his tweeting teammates and always said no. While I’m pretty sure he was set up by his teammates (most likely Will Middlebrooks), the man has already been taking advantage of the 140 character limit and has been ridiculous.

Mostly, the guy is just obsessed with Bigfoot. Yea, Sasquatch.

First, this just makes me happy because I love the show Finding Bigfoot. I think it’s hysterical that there are people that spend their days hunting for Bigfoot. Knowing that Pedroia is watching along with me, makes me feel like we’d be buddies if we ever met.

Also, he’s very serious about this show!

 

 I just have this image of Pedroia, sitting on his couch with a beer, screaming obscenities at his television. “I WANT THE TRUTH!” Can you see it? I totally can and it kills me.

Aside from the Bigfoot obsession, I feel that we’re going to be seeing some greatness coming from this twitter account. Let’s just hope he’s able to bite his tongue,  err fingers, when it comes to trash talking down the road.