Let’s Just Go Ahead and Demolish Fenway Park

I have to start this piece by clarifying that I’m not really arguing that Fenway Park should be demolished. This is a satirical piece. But so many of you threw a fit after I wrote this piece that I don’t have a choice. Now, given the Red Sox concern about Tom Yawkey’s legacy, they should just go ahead and demolish Fenway Park. Why settle on a simple street name change? After all, Yawkey is arguably responsible for Fenway Park being the great place it is today. So let’s just erase it!

Yawkey bought the Red Sox in 1933 after inheriting $40 million from a rich uncle. Hedemolish fenway park immediately began work on renovating Fenway Park. Before his purchase, Fenway Park was a dump. Part of the park had burned down in 1926. It hadn’t even been that well maintained since it opened in 1912. Yawkey’s renovations included better seating (much of which still exists today). It also included the construction of what we know as the Green Monster wall. If it wasn’t for Yawkey, Fenway Park would have fallen into disrepair and eventually condemned. But since he was such a racist, maybe the Red Sox should just demolish Fenway Park to make sure they’ve done enough to distance itself from him.

Demolish Fenway Park And Build A New Racist-Free Ballpark!

The Red Sox could do what Patriots did and build a new stadium out in the middle of nowhere. That way they won’t have to risk seeing Yawkey’s name on anything nearby. Fans won’t have to walk past the Yawkey Center for Cancer Care. They won’t have to take the train to Yawkey Station. The Red Sox could better control how much exposure the fans will have to the charities sponsored by the Yawkey family. Think about it! A new stadium means the Red Sox can erase their past and start new!

Okay that’s enough. I think you get my point. Listen, in no way am I defending Yawkey’s decision to be the last team to integrate. That’s a burden Yawkey’s legacy will have to endure forever. But while Yawkey could have done so much more to secure his legacy than just throwing money at charities, renaming Yawkey Way isn’t a step in the right direction. I’m struggling to understand the team’s motive here. Why do they want to change the street’s name now? If John Henry and Sam Kennedy are this concerned about Yawkey’s legacy, why did they wait until now to do something about it? Confederate monuments are coming down because they’re a lightning rod for white supremacy. That’s a legitimate reason and I fully support it. But what’s the team’s reason for changing Yawkey Way now? Is it a pre-emptive measure to keep protestors away before they can form?

What Will Renaming Yawkey Way Change?

Changing the street’s name won’t change history. If anything, it only drudges up old and painful memories, among other things. It puts the charities named after Yawkey in a very awkward position, which could jeopardize their missions. Furthermore, can one really argue that Yawkey Way is the same as a monument commemorating leaders who led a rebellion against the United States in an effort to preserve slavery? Perhaps we should look at Yawkey and use him as an example of what happens when someone doesn’t pay attention to social issues.

Continue to hold Yawkey’s legacy accountable, but don’t pretend everything will be okay if the city changes the street name. Instead of erasing something that wasn’t intended to evoke racism, look to it as a life lesson.

Sam Kennedy Leading Efforts To Rename Yawkey Way

The Boston Red Sox announced in August that they wanted Yawkey Way renamed. Their concern stems from a racist legacy left in the wake of Tom Yawkey’s ownership. As of today, a Boston Red Sox-themed Instagram page titled “bostonstrong_34” with a following of over 91,000 users posted that Red Sox President Sam Kennedy confirmed the team’s efforts to eventually change the street name. With Sam Kennedy leading the efforts to rename Yawkey Way, it’s clear that this change could come sooner than later.

In a book coming out on Yawkey titled Tom Yawkey: Patriarch of the Boston Red Sox,sam kennedy leading author Bill Nowlin explores the man that very few know or understand. In an article published by prosportsdaily.com, Nowlin stated that “I never once found any evidence that Yawkey was personally racist. Nor did interviews with several dozen Sox players, including Pumpsie Green and Reggie Smith, turn up any such a suggestion. I looked for a smoking gun, and couldn’t find one.” That doesn’t mean he was without flaws. In an e-mail message to me, Nowlin elaborated, “He owned 100% of the team, and on 24 hours’ notice he could have ensured the Red Sox had an African American ballplayer. The facts show that the team was institutionally racist up until at least 1959 – though it’s also only fair to note that so was every newspaper in Boston, and many other institutions as well.”

I recently discussed this topic in an earlier post. I wrote that the Yawkey Way name should stay in place. While Tom Yawkey owned the Red Sox when they became the last team to integrate, I don’t believe Yawkey himself was a true racist. Of course, this does not excuse him from any blame or responsibility for the team’s legacy under his ownership. While Tom Yawkey wasn’t exactly a Civil Rights Leader, he wasn’t a racist. So while Yawkey bears the responsibility for the team’s racist history during his tenure as owner, it’s difficult to place him at the same level as the KKK as many are insinuating. With Sam Kennedy leading the charge on this move, I am disappointed because I don’t think he thought about this idea very thoroughly at all.

Sam Kennedy Leading A Dishonest And Very Flawed Effort

Yawkey wasn’t perfect; far from it. But he was also a very generous man who didn’t collect on loans he gave to his players, both black and white. To me, this suggests that he may have evolved in his views on race for the better.

To rename Yawkey Way is to suggest that people can’t change. What’s the point of educating others about the dangers of bigotry if we don’t recognize the effect it has? Do we continue to call someone a racist even if they eventually changed their views? What do the stories about how generous Yawkey was towards players say about him? It certainly doesn’t excuse him from any responsibility regarding the team’s stance on integration before 1959. But it’s also not a good excuse to rename Yawkey Way.

Kennedy wants to rename Yawkey Way for the wrong reasons. He wants a scapegoat that he thinks will alleviate the focus on the Red Sox messy record on integration. He is also exploiting a very serious issue in America. He’s trying to make the team look like they care about combating bigotry in America. While I don’t doubt his sincerity, I feel he would have made this move years ago if he felt this way.

Keep Yawkey Way So We Don’t Forget His Mistakes

Calls to tear down Confederate monuments are making headlines throughout the United States. Violence in Charlottesville has brought attention to our nation’s history that leave many divided. Personally, I think most of them should come down and be placed in museums. Racists erected them to intimidate African Americans, and they represent nothing but treason and oppression. Calls to rename other parks and streets that bare the names of ambiguous persons of history echo those same demands. One of those demands includes renaming Yawkey Way. While I think Confederate monuments should come down, I think they should keep Yawkey Way the way it is.

Yawkey Way was named after Tom Yawkey, the owner of the Boston Red Sox from 1933keep yawkey way to 1976. Many remember Yawkey as a racist. During his reign, the Boston Red Sox were the last team to integrate when Pumpsie Green took the field in 1959. Before then, the Red Sox had chances to sign players like Jackie Robinson, Willie Mays, and Sam Jethroe, all Rookies of the Year. Additionally, he employed Mike “Pinky” Higgins, a manager who made no effort to keep his distain for African Americans a secret. Higgins is the primary reason why the Red Sox didn’t integrate for years. Yawkey not only kept Higgins around, but he even promoted him through the years. Unlike owners like Branch Rickey and Bill Veeck, Yawkey chose to play along with the rest of the owners in baseball and drag their feet before integrating their teams. That will always be a part of his reputation and deservedly so.

Keep Yawkey Way So We Don’t Forget, and Repeat, The Past

Going back to my introduction, Confederate monuments need to come down because they represent a time in our nation’s history when traitors tried to tear this country apart. For many years after the war ended, its sympathizers tried to retain the honor of the south by erecting monuments, partly so they could continue terrorizing and intimidating African Americans who they’d oppressed for years. Many of these Confederate monuments were built specifically and deliberately to push back against integration and Civil Rights. That’s why they now need to come down. In fact, Robert E. Lee, commander of the Confederate forces, discouraged monuments. He thought they “keep open the sores of war” (Boy was he right).

Was Yawkey Way given its name for the same reasons? Of course not. Yawkey Way was named to honor Tom Yawkey, not to intimidate African Americans from coming to Fenway Park.

Keep Yawkey Way To Hold Yawkey’s Legacy Responsible

Yawkey Way bares the name of an owner responsible for modernizing Fenway Park. He played an important role in the history of the Red Sox and in baseball. Many ballplayers, black and white, remember him as being a very generous and approachable man. Deep down, he probably didn’t harbor racist sentiments as intense as Higgins’. However, he’s still responsible for that racist legacy. He could have done what Rickey and Veeck did and integrate the Red Sox before any other team. But he didn’t.

So instead of letting Yawkey and the Red Sox off the hook, the team needs to keep Yawkey Way. Of course, the current ownership doesn’t hold the same views Yawkey did, but they chose to buy the team and its dark legacy comes with that. They don’t get to “erase” that. It would also enable people to forget about the terrible mistakes Tom Yawkey made. Instead of erasing that history, the Red Sox should use this opportunity not only to remember a dark past, but take efforts to ensure they don’t go down similar paths.

Keep Yawkey Way To Ensure We Don’t Forget

There is no easy solution here. People will remain angry no matter what’s done. But let’s keep things in perspective here. This publication, which also bears the Yawkey name, looks to a future that includes equality and opportunity for everyone. To rename the street would jeopardize those efforts to craft a better future. Personally, I write for Yawkey Way Report because I want to help create a future with more equal opportunities so that everyone, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, etc. have a chance to thrive, whether it’s in baseball or in other aspects of life. Renaming Yawkey Way would indirectly disrupt those efforts because those involved would have to start from scratch to associate itself with a new title. That takes time, and frankly, I don’t see how that’s a better approach. That’s like tearing down an entire house just because the kitchen is unstable.

So instead of looking at Yawkey Way as a symbol of racism, look to it as a symbol of change. Tom Yawkey, while he could have done much more, tried to change his views for the better. Does that excuse his behavior? No. But renaming a street isn’t a zero sum solution and it never will be. We need to take the good with the bad. We can remember Tom Yawkey as an innovative owner while also holding his legacy responsible for its reprehensible actions. To change the name of Yawkey Way would be to erase and rewrite a history that, despite its darkness, is important to remember so we do not repeat it.

Why Does Fenway Park Feel So Empty This Season?

I’ve had season tickets since 2015 and every game I wiggle through large crowds to get to my seats. Even in their bad years Fenway Park always seemed packed. On a good day large crowds congregated on Lansdowne Street. Vendors peddle programs, peanuts, and t-shirts. It’s difficult to break through the crowds on these days. The chaos, however, Fenway Park feelis what makes going to Fenway so much fun. Lately though it feels like something’s missing. Entire sections of bleacher seats are vacant. There doesn’t seem to be as many vendors stationed outside the park. The 50/50 raffle drawing pot isn’t nearly what it was last season. So why does Fenway Park feel so empty this season?

For one thing the weather hasn’t been too cooperative. A rainout cancelled the first game of the series between the Red Sox and Yankees. Wednesday’s game made for a very wet and damp night. An unverified rumor claimed that Wednesday’s game saw the fewest fans between the two rivals in years. That’s uncharacteristic of a series between the two. But what are the other reasons?

You could argue that the absence of David Ortiz is keeping fans away. There’s no more Big Papi to root for. After he retired, fans weren’t left with anyone on the team to really cheer for. Sure, there’s players like Dustin Pedrioa but he doesn’t appeal to fans the way Ortiz did. While that might not be the entire reason, it’s difficult not to notice the differences in the crowds between this season and last. Another reason is that the Red Sox aren’t playing too well. The front office spent hundreds of millions of dollars on big-names and so far they’ve seen little return on their investment. It doesn’t help when Chris Sale strikes out ten but still loses the game due to a lack of run support.

Why Does Fenway Park Feel Empty? Don’t Worry, It Won’t Last Long

On a more rationale level though, it’s important to remember that the season is barely a month old. School’s still in session. The weather hasn’t leveled out yet. More fans should come when school gets out and the weather gets more consistent. But for the first time since moving here, I’m hearing more and more fans say out loud that they’re not going to pay for a ticket to watch the Red Sox lose when they can just stay at home and watch them for free. Fenway Park is one of the most expensive parks in baseball. Add bad weather and hitting to that and you got empty seats.

While I know the fanbase will grow as the weather gets warmer, it’s hard to shake the feeling that something is making Fenway Park feel empty. I hate seeing fans leave so early. I also hate seeing Lansdowne and Yawkey Way less crowded before games. But as Terrance Mann in Field of Dreams said, “People will come…People will most definitely come.”

Fenway Spring Signals Upcoming Season

Like most people in Boston, I’ve been thoroughly enjoying the warmer spring weather. For some it means breaking out the grill, while for others it means putting the top down on the convertible. But for me, the warmer spring weather means that I can enjoy my walk from my home to Fenway Park. I love Fenway spring weather.

Most Red Sox fans can tell you their own personal stories about what Fenway Park means to them. After all, for many of us it’s a home away from home. As I walked down Fenway SpringYawkey Way the other day I found myself getting excited about the upcoming season. It made me realize that it won’t be long before I can begin the ritual I always follow when I go to a game at Fenway Park.

If there’s a night game, I usually leave my place around 5pm and walk to the park, about a half hour walk. I always wear a Red Sox jersey (usually either Carlton Fisk’s, or Xander Bogaerts’) along with red socks, red Chuck Taylors, and some kind of Sox t-shirt and hat (A little dorky, I know). I always take my baseball glove too, especially after a line drive almost beaned me in the face last May (they come in much faster than you might think). When I reach the park I first visit Demitri, a loyal employee of The Sausage Guy stationed on Lansdowne Street. At $3 a dog you can’t go wrong. After chatting it up with him for a little bit, I make my way towards Yawkey Way where, before I know it, I’m surrounded by other fervent Red Sox fans, many of who are probably carrying out their own pre-game rituals. I make my way to the Yawkey Way Store where I browse new items before heading to the back to see what former ballplayer is signing autographs that day. Who doesn’t love meeting someone who once played for the Red Sox?

As game time nears, I make my way to my seat on the first base line, but not before getting a beer from Sharon, a vendor I’ve gotten to know over the last year. Teaching is both our day jobs so we often swipe stories about lesson plans and students before I thank her and make my way to my seat. As I settle into my seat, I always make a point to look around and think about the history of the park. Fenway Park is a cathedral, and I’m one of its parishioners. It’s sacred ground and should be treated as such.

As it gets warmer out, it won’t be long before I get to do my ritual again. I can almost smell the hot dogs!

Just Outside the Gates of Fenway Park

Just outside the gates of Fenway Park

Back row l to r Zach, Sly, Charlie, Aidrian, Eugene; front Jenny, Brendon

(The following is a season recap by Yawkey Way Report Hawker and Operation Manager, Jenny Reynolds)
Driving in towards Fenway Park early in the morning on Opening Day, it hit me like a sack of bricks. What on Earth was I doing? I was on my way to hawk magazines at my personal field of dreams, which also happens to be an undeniably magical place people cross the world to experience. How did I get here?
A chance meeting and a great conversation about a month before had led me here. There is no denying that our President/CEO Sly Edigio is one of those larger-than-life personalities, and there is no questioning his love for the Red Sox. From day one, I fully believed in him and what he was trying to do with this publication. And I was definitely coming along for the ride.
Opening day was amazing. I’d never been to one as a fan, and it was almost overwhelming. The sights, sounds, and smells outside the park filled me; the promise of a fresh start and the passion of the fans could be felt in the air. There were pictures taken, interviews given, and lots of happy customers. My body was exhausted, but I was in love with my new job.
When Fenway was closed during the hunt for the marathon bombers, my already weary spirit took another heavy blow. In just those few weeks, I had grown even more attached to the park, and although safety must come first, my anger flared once again. The attack had already been so personal; now it directly affected a place I called home.
The day the crowds came back to the park was one I’ll never forget. It was a beautiful spring day, and you could feel the spirit of our city and its people: strong, determined, and faithful. To be there and actively participating in the ordered chaos that is pregame at Fenway Park was an honor. To go back to normal was a huge step on the road to recovery. Our “Believe in Boston” flags did not disappoint, and seeing them later on TV, being waved throughout the park, made me proud. It was that day I knew we had something special at Yawkey Way Report.
As April rained itself into May, our crew combatted the downpours and rain delays by bonding with each other. We’d sit around telling stories while watching the rain fall at Gate B, and we started to become friends. To laugh and joke so much at most jobs would get you fired! Over the course of the season, we’ve had hawkers come and go, but the core crew of this company is a great mix of people of all ages, genders, backgrounds, and personalities. In many cases, we don’t have much more than the Red Sox in common, but together we are family. It is a bond that can’t be broken.
It’s not easy to be a hawker. It requires personality, wit, a strong work ethic, and belief in your product and yourself. It definitely isn’t for everyone. You have to face rejection, other vendors, crazy fans, and you must always be prepared for anything. It can get overwhelming even to our best sellers, and as a result we continually added to our roster. Many people didn’t even make it through the tryout phase, but at the same time, we’ve seen quiet guys turn into power sellers.
As May turned into June and the weather and spirits around the park began to pick up, it was becoming clear that my lifetime of being quiet and shy did not translate into instant success as a seller. I had my good days, and a huge thank you to anyone who ever bought a program from me, but it became clear that my spot outside the park could easily be filled with a stronger seller. It was around this time I became our Park Operations Manager.
Overnight, my outlook changed. From day one as Manager, I’ve been proud to help us achieve the best success possible for the company as well as for each of our hawkers. I trusted in the experience of our veteran sellers, and worked as hard as I could to learn the ins and outs of the park as far as hawking goes. Matching personalities to different spots paid off, and we really started to take off as a company. You could see the attitudes and outlooks of our sellers change as the weeks passed by. Confidence grew, boys became men, and we continued to grow closer.
As the summer rolled on, things just kept getting better. The team and all the fans at the park brought an incredible energy with them every game, and that fueled us to do better. We went outside the box to come up with the best official giveaways and provide a positive experience for everyone that buys our program. We realize that what we do means nothing without all of you, and we set out every day to show that, with everyone giving their all.
As the playoffs became more and more of a certainty, our planning really started to pay off. We made it over every bump in the road with hard work and a little bit of good fortune. We called for all hands on deck, and everyone was ready and willing to help. The quick deadlines and last minute work of the postseason is exhausting, but there is no better feeling than walking around the park seeing our sellers in good spirits and fans happy with what we are offering. We’ve grown comfortable with our roles around the park and we are all honored to be a part of the experience. Even I have come full circle; I’ve found my Fenway voice. You may even catch me selling after games!
Today, we are leading in the ALCS and the future looks bright. No matter what happens from here on out, I can guarantee you that not only will Yawkey Way Report be back in full force next season, so will most of our hawkers. Game after game, through every clutch play, blown save, and extra inning, we’ve been there for you and for each other.
This season has given me a good idea of what it is like to play 162 games with the same group of people. My respect for professional ballplayers and anyone involved in the business of baseball has grown exponentially. The bonds that are made going through the rigors of such a demanding season are strong – and our ‘season’ was technically half as long. These are the people who have pulled me through life’s ups and downs over the past six months. Together, we’ve strengthened our shared love for this team and sport. I wouldn’t trade any of them, or anything we’ve shared, for the world. Thank you to everyone who has made this journey possible! We are proud to be part of Red Sox Nation. We are Boston Strong. We are Yawkey Way Report.